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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 2

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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:18 pm

http://thesingingcritic.blogspot.com/2011/03/new-review-jane-eyre.html

Friday, March 18, 2011
NEW Review: Jane Eyre
Young orphan Jane Eyre (Amelia Clarkson) lives with her cruel Aunt Sarah (Sally Hawkins), who doesn’t like the child and finds a minor excuse to throw the child out of her house. Sent to an orphanage, Jane chafes under the cruel tutelage of schoolmaster Mr. Brocklehurst (Simon Burney). Eight years later, Jane (now played by Mia Wasikowska) secures employment with Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender) as a governess to Rochester’s excitable ward Adele (Romy Settbon Moore). Under the watchful gaze of housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench), Jane settles into her new life at Thornfield Hall and feels safe for the first time in her life. However, footsteps outside her door and strange noises heard late at night suggest that the brooding manor house hides many dark secrets.

Charlotte Bronte’s Gothic romance is one of the masterpieces of English literature, but despite 19 previous adaptations, there has never been a definitive film version of the story. This one comes very close, although it does make some fundamental changes to the long novel. By necessity, Moira Buffini’s screenplay must abbreviate Jane’s entire childhood into a few quick scenes, but the point of her sad early life is made. In the book, Rochester talked much but revealed little, making his attentiveness seem particularly cruel to Jane when she learns just how much he is withholding. Here, the master of the house still holds his secrets close to his vest, but his brooding nature is borne of sadness and guilt rather than of any subterfuge. Jane, too, has had something of a makeover - less pious and therefore less of a simpering victim than in the novel.

Wasikowska’s pale, porcelain features work perfectly for this role, looking like she’ll break into a million pieces if handled too roughly. She may seem fragile, but her intelligence, fortitude and resolve are all the weapons she needs to handle the challenges thrown at her. Fassbender downplays the brooding intensity, which make him more mysterious than ever. His attentions toward Jane are at once amorous and dismissive, tender yet distant. Director Cary Fukunaga doesn’t engage in cinematic trickery and allows the dark-hued cinematography, stiff collared costumes, shadowy sets and Dario Marianelli’s superb music to supply the heavy Gothic atmosphere. I’m not sure that any film of just two hours running time could ever do justice to Bronte’s masterpiece, but this version gets the tone just right. (* * * ½)
- by Jonathan Lewis
Posted by Singing Critic at 10:14 AM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:21 pm

http://www.jayflix.net/2011/03/jane-eyre.html

3/18/11
Jane Eyre
At least this generation will get a look at a classic. This telling of an oft- told tale is fairly true to Charlotte Brontë's gloomy Gothic, although it starts with completely unnecessary skipping around through time (linear storytelling is SOOO out of vogue!); but once it settles down we see our favorite orphan girl cope with rejection, typhoid and a spooky house.

In my opinion, they ramped up the "GOTCHA!" moments more than necessary, but the story is still intact. Director Cary Fukinaga ("Sin Nombre") clearly is trying to appeal to the current generation and I appreciate that.

Some of the cast is worthy of mention:

* Mia Wasikowska "vash-i-kov-ska" ("Alice in Wonderland") is our eponymous heroine. She seems authentic with very little makeup and only two dresses in her wardrobe.
* Michael Fassbender ("Inglourious Basterds") is a fairly politically correct Mr. Rochester. Mr. F bears a fleeting resemblance to a young Laurence Olivier...may he rest in peace...
* Jamie Bell ("Defiance" and "Billy Elliot") is the earnest young would-be missionary who refuses to travel with a young woman unless they are respectably married.
* Judi Dench ("Cranford") is the sturdy and dependable house- keeper, Mrs. Fairfax.

This movie runs a little longer than necessary, but many in the audience were not familiar with the story (to my shock and dismay!), so in the interests of storytelling....sigh...

In another two or three years someone else will re-mount this old war horse (23 versions are listed at first glance) and we'll be off to the races again. This is one of the most durable love stories in classic literature.
Posted by Jayflix at 6:57 AM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:22 pm

http://www.onestopnewsstand.com/ottawa/movie-review-jane-eyre

Movie Review: Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre
Directed by: Cary Fukunaga
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender
Rating: ***

Of the films based on Charlotte Bronte’s beloved 19th-century novel of madness on the moors, this may be the most realistic. It’s bleak, slow and grim, like life in those forbidding stone piles where Jane has spent her sad life. The deadly artifice of society threatens her as much as her escapes into the harsh natural world outside. Wasikowska isn’t up to playing the steel-willed literary heroine and seems mismatched with Fassbender’s dark magnetism. Sally Hawkins, who brutalises Jane as her smirking, sadistic aunt, gets under the skin more than the fog and rot and mistrust.

Entertainment news from metronews.ca/ottawa
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:31 pm

http://soberingconclusion.com/movies/2011/jane-eyre/

Fri 18 Mar 2011
Jane Eyre

By Ian Forbes

Jane Eyre
I don’t understand how you can spurn me when I’ve got these sweet mutton chops. Theatrical Release Date: 03/18/2011
Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga
Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins, Judi Dench, Amelia Clarkson
Rated: PG-13 for some thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content.
Runtime: 1 hour, 55 minutes Trailer:

Look into my eyes. You will love me.

There are plenty of people who had to read Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre in school. And I’m sure there are quite a few who have seen one of the many adaptations, either on the big screen or via TV movie/mini-series. Somehow I’m not one of them (I went to school, really I did).

For those in the same boat, the story is your quintessential British period piece. A girl (the titular Jane Eyre – played by Mia Wasikowska) is sent to boarding school by an Aunt (Sally Hawkins) who has become her guardian since the death of Jane’s parents (an English story about an orphan? No way!). She becomes a governess for the daughter of a well-to-do man (Michael Fassbender) and although Jane has no social standing, they fall in love. But like all good romances, things play out a bit tragically and throughout the course of the film, we watch as Jane struggles to take some measure of control over her life in a society not so conducive to letting non-aristocratic women rise too far (and I assume the novel does pretty much the same).

Wasikowska delivers a nice performance and is showing the kind of acting chops that should keep her in demand in the future, having capitalized on being Alice in Tim Burton’s trip to Wonderland and as one of the kids in “The Kids Are All Right“. She shows a nice chemistry with Fassbender, ably dosing out wit and measured defiance but also managing to keep a growing desire for him always right beneath the surface of their interactions.

While Fassbender also acquits himself well, and Judi Dench once again takes a small role and makes it seem practically regal, one of the strongest performances in the film comes from Amelia Clarkson, playing the younger version of Jane Eyre. The audience’s connection to Jane begins with how Clarkson portrays being orphaned and put under her Aunt’s inauspicious auspices. The fire and rebellion of the character are actually more evident in her scenes than in Wasikowska’s, and without them, it might make the adult Jane feel a bit blander than intended with nothing to draw from in her past.

Really the only misstep in casting comes with Jamie Bell, as a Pastor who helps Jane find a job (and of course, falls in love with her). Although Bell has the capability to be very good on-screen, the character feels like it should be played by someone ten years older. His youth makes his social standing and attempt to marry Jane ring hollow.

I had gone into the film most excited about the direction of Cary Joji Fukunaga, who helmed the excellent “Sin Nombre“. While I knocked him for seeming to stretch that film too much, it’s easier to see why “Jane Eyre” runs nearly two hours, netting the film a 3.5 out of 5. And although this too can feel a bit slow at times, and the disjointed storytelling at the beginning seems self-indulgent, the acting, cinematography and production design should allow most into period piece films or with a particular affinity for the novel to get what they want out of this experience.

3.5 out of 5
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:31 pm

http://buyboynton.com/blog/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre
March 18, 2011
By admin

Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender star in the romantic drama based on Charlotte Bronte’s classic novel, from acclaimed director Cary Fukunaga. In the story, Jane Eyre flees Thornfield House, where she works as a governess for wealthy Edward Rochester. As she reflects upon the people and emotions that have defined her, it is clear that the isolated and imposing residence – and Mr. Rochester’s coldness – have sorely tested the young woman’s resilience, forged years earlier when she was orphaned. She must now act decisively to secure her own future and come to terms with the past that haunts her – and the terrible secret that Mr. Rochester is hiding and that she has uncovered. (Focus Features)

Rated: PG-13

Release Date: Mar 11, 2011
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:32 pm

http://www.seattlegayscene.com/2011/03/the-movies-column-brontes-back-baby.html

The Movies Column: Bronte’s Back Baby

Welcome to the first day of spring, a time when we still have one foot firmly planted in winter. Since we’re still expecting cold and rain for the rest of the week, why not spend a few hours in your local movie theater.

New arrivals:

Wasikowska: the plainest girl they could find in Hollywood

Jane Eyre, directed by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre), starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, and Jamie Bell with cameos by Dame Judi Densch and Sally Hawkins. Hands down one of the best romances ever written, Jane Eyre has been remade countless times by the BBC. A personal fav is the 1983 version starring a smoking hot Timothy Dalton as the dark and brooding Mister Rochester. Of course Hollywood would never cast a real-life ugly girl as the lead, but Mia Wasikowska does a pretty good job frumping it up as the titular Jane. Screw all the chaste Twilight vampire crap, give me the gothic bosom heavings of classic Brontë any day. (Landmark Egyptian, 805 E Pine St, 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, and 9:45)
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:33 pm

http://seligpolyscope.com/filmnews/2011/03/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Mar18

Posted by Gary on Mar 18, 2011 in Film - Theatrical, Reviews

By Gary Murray

Starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell

Written by Moira Buffni

Based on the novel by Charlotte Bronte

Directed by Cary Fukunaga

Running time 115 min

MPAA Rating PG-13

Jane Eyre is one of those books that high school students are made to read. The Bronte story has been analyzed time and time again by youngsters trying to figure out symbolism and substance while struggling over language. It has also been made into at least five different filmed versions. The latest is by Cary Fukunaga.

The story starts with a young woman (Mia Wasikowska) escaping through the moors and away from Thornfield Hall. She is found by a family of servants, two women and a young man St John Rivers (Jamie Bell). They feed her and help get her a job at the local school.

Then we go back to the beginning. Jane Eyre is a girl who has been orphaned and left with her relation (Sally Hawkins). When Jane stands-up for herself, she is sent away to boarding school and banned to stay on holidays. Soon, she is shunned but still makes a single friend.

After the adventures in school, our young adult Jane (Mia Wasikowska) lands a position as Governess at Thornfield Hall. Jane is to teach a young French girl Adele (Romy Settbon Moore). Her father is always away on business and Jane finds comfort with the head housekeeper Mrs. Fairbanks (Judi Dench). One day the master of the house Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender) comes home. He is smitten by Jane, who never backs down in presenting her opinions.

The story of Jane Eyre is of her falling for a man above her stature. What starts out as friendship blooms into something more. It is also about a dark secret in Thornfield Hall and the romance between Rochester and a lady of bearing and wealth. The triangle of love between the star-crossed drives the movie.

The only part of Jane Eyre I enjoyed was the performance of Mia Wasikowska. She captures the mousey innocence of the role while keeping the strong backbone of the character. Her wide-eyed portrayal lends itself to the material and she is believable in the period piece.

The same cannot be said for our two male leads. Jamie Bell is a solid actor and brings his A-game to even mediocre flicks. Here, his role seems little more than an overblown cameo. He is in and out of the movie so fast that one wonders how he received such a high billing. When the big finish happens with his character, it is as unexpected as it is forced. Michael Fassbender has the same problems with his character. No one believes the turn of his Rochester and the performance comes of as phony. One never truly understands the attraction between any of the leads; it all comes across as weak.

The supporting women in Jane Eyre fair much better. Judi Dench is spot-on wonderful as Mrs. Fairbanks, the stern taskmaster of the house. She is much wiser than she lets on and tries to be the mother figure of Jane, warning her of the evils of rich men. With so little to do, Sally Hawkins part could have been given to a much less accomplished actress. But in her frail hands, she delivers some emotional punches and abject sorrows.

There are some major problems with Jane Eyre, all falling on the shoulder of director Cary Fukunaga. He never finds the romance between Jane and Rochester. There is no passion with glances, no steamy desire. When the two touch, there should be some electricity instead of the dull thud delivered. The other problem with Jane Eyre is that it looks horrible. The lighting is flat and the colors dull. We get no sense of warmth in the background and it affects the characters in the foreground. One wonders just how such a flat flick could have been approved.

This version of Jane Eyre will never stand head and shoulders above the rest. Arguably, the best version is the 1944 adaptation with Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles. But if this version helps kids discover the novel, then it is worth the task.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:34 pm

http://moviemusicuk.us/2011/03/17/jane-eyre-dario-marianelli/

JANE EYRE – Dario Marianelli
March 17, 2011

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë’s timeless tale of love, madness and female empowerment, has been brought to life several times on the big screen, and inspired some excellent scores, most notably by Bernard Herrmann and John Williams. This new film, directed by Cary Fukunaga, stars Mia Wasikowska as the eponymous heroine, who was mistreated and downtrodden as a young girl in 17th century England, but eventually grows up to be the governess of a young girl at the rambling, imposing Thornfield Hall. Jane falls in love with the dashing master of the house, Rochester (Michael Fassbender), but as her relationship with the raffish gentleman develops, increasingly strange things begin to happen during the night in the dark and dusty corridors of Thornfield, testing Jane’s nerve, and her sanity. The film also stars Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins and Judi Dench, and features a sumptuous, utterly beautiful score by Dario Marianelli.

Since winning his Oscar for Atonement in 2007, Marianelli’s output has been generally high quality, but surprisingly meager; The Brave One, Everybody’s Fine, the wonderful Agora, and last year’s Eat Pray Love were all fine works, but other than Agora none of them really came close to recapturing the refinement and elegance Marianelli showed in his earlier works for British period films – until now. Jane Eyre inhabits the same intimate sonic world as Atonement and 2005’s Pride & Prejudice, and as such will appeal to fans of his style in that genre, but where Jane Eyre excels is in its emotional impact. This is a score which gets under your skin, makes you feel the nervousness and uncertainty Jane feels during her time at Thornfield, before exploding into rapturous romanticism.

The score is written for a comparatively small ensemble – a string orchestra, light woodwinds, and prominent solos featuring harp, piano, solo voices, and an utterly transcendent violin element performed by the 31-year old British virtuoso violinist Jack Liebeck, who was a finalist in the BBC Young Musician of the Year competition in 1994. There is virtually no brass, and virtually no percussion, and as such the score retains a sense of somber classicism throughout its 44-minute running time. Liebeck’s violin is the soul of the score; it is present in virtually every cue at some point, but often rises to the fore, especially in cues such as “In Jest or Earnest”, the mellifluous “Waiting for Mr. Rochester”, the stunningly rapturous “Yes!”, the powerful and defiant “The Call Within”, and the achingly beautiful conclusive pair, “Awaken” and “My Edward and I”. In many ways, Marianelli sees Jane as the violin, and Liebeck’s delicious performances express her emotions directly to the listener. When she is sad, or downtrodden, the violin echoes her despondency. When she is happy, or when her love for Rochester is finally reciprocated, the violin soars.

Marianelli’s string writing is exceptionally clever. In many cues, each section of the strings – violins, violas, celli and basses – are doing four different things simultaneously, creating a wall of sound which threatens to overwhelm the listener, but which somehow manages to remain cohesive and coherent. This technique is most evident in two cues: the stunning “An Insuperable Impediment”, which begins with a death-rattle bass passacaglia and gradually picks up the rest of the string section in turn, creating a sense of desperate unease as Thornfield reveals its secrets; and the subsequent “Jane’s Escape”, which maintains its dark and brooding aspect.

Elsewhere, Marianelli strips the score down to its barest bones, often featuring just a handful of instruments in tandem: cello and harp in “The End of Childhood”, or an unaccompanied solo piano in “A Game of Badminton” and “Life on the Moors”. The latter of these cues is an almost archetypal Brontëan piece: listening to it, one can almost picture a lonely Jane, standing on top of a windswept outcrop, gazing over a sea of frost-chilled heather and ferns, a grey sky heavy like wet towels threatening to engulf her, mirroring her despair.

The subtle vocal element that opens the score in “Wandering Jane” relates directly to Bertha Mason, the ‘insuperable impediment’ which threatens to thwart Jane’s dreams of a life with Rochester, and whose presence looms large over the entire narrative. It re-occurs later in the ghostly “A Thorough Education”, the baleful and oppressive “Arrival at Thornfield Hall”, and the eerie “A Restless Night”, constantly reminding the listener that the creepiness that envelops Thornfield at twilight is not all as it seems. The vocals are performed by English soprano Melanie Pappenheim, whose voice also appears on Murray Gold’s soundtracks of the recent BBC Doctor Who revival.

Jane Eyre does retain a highly classical and constant tone throughout the score, so listeners who require variety, or more action-based stimulation in their film music, are likely to find Jane Eyre something of a one-note effort. Personally, however, I found the score to be a triumph from start to finish. It’s not a romantic score in the sense that Delerue wrote romantic scores – Charlotte Brontë’s stories are too dour and too steeped in mist and bracken for that – but Marianelli’s subtle, searching writing still allows the romanticism inherent in the story to shine through. It’s a score which carefully weaves a musical web with strings as fine as silk, and draws the listener in.

In many ways, Jane Eyre is a score without weaknesses; every cue, even the shortest ones, have an important part to play in the score’s narrative structure, which is rare indeed when too often soundtrack albums are littered with needless filler to pad out 80 minutes of available CD space. Jane Eyre runs for 44 minutes and 34 seconds, and would be poorer if it were any shorter, or any longer. This is, unquestionably, the first truly great score of 2011, and will be a major contender for score of the year honors.

Rating: *****
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:35 pm

http://www.dallasmoviescreenings.com/2011/03/jane-eyre.html

Thursday, March 17, 2011
Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë 1847 gothic story of a plain English governess who falls in love with the mysterious Bryonic Edward Rochester has spurred over 36 movies, radio, musical and TV versions since 1910. This time the film directed by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) have pared down the very detailed novel to a moody atmospheric plea for Jane's struggle to be treated like a independent human being.

The story opens with Jane (Mia Wasikowska) running away from from Thornfield Hall, getting caught in a storm on the moors. She is taken in by a brother and his sisters who nurse her back to health. St. John Rivers finds her a job teaching the local farmers daughters. The story then flashes back on how Jane came to be where she is now. As an orphaned child she was kicked out of her aunts home and sent to a charity school where she is accused of being decitful. Her sense of self worth is evident then as she does not back down from the attitude and self-righteous clergyman who runs the school. Her only friend Helen passes away from consumption. Somehow Jane survives the abuse at school and the loneliness, the movie doesn't really explain. Years later Jane receives the offer of a job teaching a French child at the estate of Thornfield Hall. Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench) the head housekeeper keeps the rooms ever ready as she never knows when Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender) will be home. For once Jane feels comfortable and happy with her surroundings, despite the creepy noises that are coming from a wing of the sprawling mansion. When the dashing Mr. Rochester does come home her confidence and ability to speak her mind sparks his interest. Despite the slow build up Mr. Rochester with his swoon worthy eyes finds in Jane salvation from whatever it is that keeps him away from his home. They decide to wed, but soon that thump in the night becomes a fire in house, a person being shot, and Jane running away across the moors. She meets up with the River family and soon the brother (Jamie Bell) wants Jane to marry him and become a missionary wife. When Jane can't get Mr. Rochester out of her head, she returns only to find Thornfield burned to the ground.

Wasikowska is strong as the emotionally controlled Jane. Her Victorian era costumes with the many layered and corseted clothing in gray and her tawny hair in loose braids wrapped around her head is in direct contrast to Jane's curious and open mind. Fassbender is brooding and yet romantic. It's unfortunate that the chemistry between the two is somewhat lacking. Jane is so repressed that her surrender to Mr. Rochester's soulful glance is lacking. It was hard to believe that they fell in love so quickly. Where's the passion? It's still a movie worth watching even for whatever Brontë's feminist message may have been at the time. In the end Jane still goes back to the rich guy.
(Review by reesa)

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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:36 pm

http://ptpopcorn.com/index.php/2011/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre
Performance-Driven Drama
Jeff Walls | 18.03.11

The marketing campaign for Jane Eyre emphasizes that it is a “bold new version” of the classic Charlotte Bronte novel. Having not read the novel, nor seen any of the previous movie versions, I can’t accurately analyze that statement, but nothing really stood out to me as being especially bold. The fact that a level of boldness failed to shine through, however, does not change the fact that this costume drama is a very well-made movie with a couple of wonderful performances.

The movie opens with Jane fleeing her past and being found on the doorstep of a young preacher and his two sisters. What Jane was running away from is explained in a series of flashbacks that make up the majority of the movie. Her parents dead, Jane is living in the house of her abusive aunt and cousin. Seeing her as a problem child, they ship her off for more abuse at a boarding school.

Now grown up, Jane leaves the school to become the governess for the ward of a rich and powerful man named Mr. Rochester. Although the rumor throughout the household is that Mr. Rochester is set to marry the high-class Miss Ingram, he finds himself quite taken with young Jane. He likes the way that she stands up to him and is not intimidated by his position. Eventually, he reveals his true feelings and asks her to marry him, but on the day that they are to be married, Mr. Rochester’s dark secret is revealed.

Mia Wasikowska as Jane EyreFor those of us who go into Jane Eyre without knowing the story, it is this dark secret that is the big moment in the movie. It’s shocking, yes, but aside from this reveal I found myself expecting some other shoe to drop, but it never did. Shock value is not really what makes a costume drama, however, and as a period love story, the movie works quite well.

The style of the film holds true to that of the recent Pride & Prejudice film starring Keira Knightley. The excellent cinematography is dark, the atmosphere is moody, and when characters go out for walks, the bottoms of their dresses get caught in the mud. The stories also have some similarities, but Jane Eyre does feature a nice twist on the idea of a love story between a rich man and a woman of more humble origins.

What makes this movie, however, are the performances. The movie is by far at its best in the dialogue scenes between Jane and Mr. Rochester, played by Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, two actors who are definitely on the rise. After starring in both a blockbuster and a critically acclaimed independent comedy last year (Alice in Wonderland and The Kids Are All Right), Wasikowska is already worthy of being called one of Hollywood’s best young actresses, and her determined performance here is only going to further cement that reputation.

Fassbender earned plenty of praise from both critics and audiences for his role in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds and later this year he will take over for Ian McKellan as Magneto in X-Men: First Class. As the privileged Mr. Rochester, Fassbender could have easily just gotten by with one of those stiff performances that often seem to populate the male roles in these period dramas, but instead he creates a truly compelling character who goes toe-to-toe with Wasikowka. The chemistry between the two actors shines through in each of their many head-to-head dialogue scenes and it is that chemistry that really makes this movie click.

Having been a big fan of Pride & Prejudice only to be told that it was a horrible adaptation by fans of the book, I can’t even pretend to know how fans of the Jane Eyre novel will receive this movie version. But for movie fans who enjoy excellently-produced period romances with excellent performances, they should find plenty to like in this one.

Jane Eyre is rated PG-13 for “some thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content.” There’s a scene of brutal violence that may shock some people, but otherwise there is little to be offended by in this movie in terms of content.

Courtesy of a local publicist, Jeff attended a promotional screening of Jane Eyre.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:36 pm

http://www.reelfilmnews.com/?p=919

MOVIE REVIEW – Jane Eyre
Posted on March 18, 2011 by wayres8935

Jane Eyre

Most of us are familiar with the story of Jane Eyre. It’s based on a classic novel by world renowned author Charlotte Brontë. It’s a classic story of a young girl living in old England and the struggles that she has to go through. Women today are the equals of men. But in the past it wasn’t always the case. Women were more servants to men and were expected to act a certain way. But every once in a while a woman with a stronger soul would emerge.

The film is directed by Cary Fukunaga and stars Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre. From a young age, Eyre was mistreated by her aunt. She had two other children and only reluctantly cared for Jane Eyre at the request of her deceased husband, who was Jane’s Uncle. Because she wants nothing to do with her, she sends her to a girl’s boarding school that will teach her to be good.

So she spends the majority of her childhood at this boarding school and when she leaves, she leaves to become a governess at a man’s estate. That man is Mr. Rochester, played by Michael Fassbender. He’s a good man, but a little stiff, and he bears a terrible secret that no one knows about. Also at his estate is a woman that assists called Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench).

Jane Eyre

Eventually Mr. Rochester begins to develop feelings toward Jane, especially since she’s not really like any woman he’s ever met. She’s strong willed and determined. She also has quite the sense of sarcasm within her. The two fall in love, but eventually his secret comes out and it threatens to tear them apart.

This is a love story. It’s definitely a movie that is going to be geared more towards women but it’s a movie everyone can appreciate.

I really enjoyed Mia Wasikowska’s performance in this film. She did a very good job and impresses me as a young actress. She did a very good job in Alice in Wonderland and continues to impress me here. Michael Fassbender also does a very good job in this film. The two of them have excellent chemistry in this film. I genuinely felt as though there was a connection between the two of them.

Jane Eyre

Judi Dench is wonderful in this film as well. She’s a complete legend and I haven’t seen a film in which I haven’t appreciated her in a role. She definitely shines here as well.

The pacing of the film was good. I rarely checked the time and felt as though the story was set up appropriately. The one issue I had with the film is that the beginning of the film starts rather near the end of the film and shortly after the beginning we get a series of flashbacks. It’s a little confusing, but easily overcome.

This is the one film opening this weekend that is more romantic and will appeal to the date crowd. It’s got the right amount of romance and if you’re looking to go out with a girl this weekend then this is the movie for you.

FINAL GRADE: B

Reel Film News Movie Review by Bill Ayres
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:37 pm

http://www.gregvellante.com/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Movie Reviews | 17. Mar, 2011 by Greg Vellante

I had the added benefit (or misfortune, depending on how you look at it) of entering Cary Fukunaga’s version of “Jane Eyre” completely blind. No knowledge of Charlotte Bronte’s classic novel or previous film adaptations meant that I was going into this story with a completely open mind, nothing to compare or contrast. For all I was concerned, this was an original idea never once brought to life before now.

And while I wrap my thoughts around this particular adaptation of “Jane Eyre,” I realize that I only have good things to say. The story is well told, adapted neatly from what I would imagine to be a generous original text.

The characters are affluently performed; Mia Wasikowska (“Alice in Wonderland”) possesses subtle elements of natural refinement in the title role, and Michael Fassbender is a force on screen as love interest Mr. Rochester (though his sideburns are occasionally guilty of upstaging his performance). The natural lighting of the film via candles and simple, handheld style of the camera work in the film’s favor, adding essence to the period-driven mood.

Yet while I compliment this film, the praise is scarce. I watched “Jane Eyre” with nothing more than an adequate amount of involvedness and level of appreciation for what I was viewing. The credits began, I shrugged, end of story. Here is a film that can only be described as “fine,” powered by a rich narrative, solid performances, and reputable direction, but with a lasting factor that is all but invisible. “Jane Eyre” is successful, but in the most ordinary fashion possible.

That being said, fans of the novel will probably adore the film. The love story between Jane and Rochester is detailed and believable, and Wasikowska and Fassbender drive this romance with authentic chemistry. And though Wasikowska has a certain lackluster personality, it works wonders for a character that is equally as bland. Fassbender has the real bite here, and supporting players like Judi Dench and Jamie Bell are well cast in their respective roles.

And people such as myself, for whom the story holds no recognition or cultural significance, we’ll just watch and most likely enjoy. The film isn’t boring by any means, but it is forgettable. “Jane Eyre” is a story told many times before, and it will likely be told again. This particular retelling had depth, but it is drained from the memory long before the story even has time to truly sink in.
B-

Greg Vellante is a film critic for The Eagle Tribune.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:38 pm

http://ordermovieposters.com/jane-eyre-movie-poster

Jane Eyre Movie Poster

Although it’s been adapted a number of times in the past, 2011′s version of Jane Eyre looks to be the most intriguing thanks in large part to adding a much darker gothic spin to the already familiarly creepy/romantic material. Promising actress, Mia Wasikowska, looks to be a great choice to carry this challenging work, and her portrayal of the legendary Jane Eyre is already being praised by critics and fans alike.

Young Jane’s (Amelia Clarkson) beginnings are plagued by cruelty living with her aunt, Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins), who’s not to keen on her niece’s stubborn individuality. Following her grueling living arrangements with Mrs. Reed, Jane is off to attend a boarding school, which implores unorthodox disciplinary methods to counteract their curriculum. Years later, Jane begins her profession as a governess for the daughter of Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender), who turns out to be Jane’s inevitable love interest in the film. However, Rochester may in fact be carrying a dark secret, which could threaten to cease their courtship.

After seeing the trailer for Jane Eyre, one might think this recent adaptation is a horror film; especially with the use of the legendary Goblin score from Suspiria accompanying it effectively. The trailer could wind up being a little misleading because even though there are hints of supernatural elements, Jane Eyre at its core is a period romance.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:05 pm

http://topstoriessaltlakecity.com/uncategorized/movies-bradley-cooper-stars-in-limitless-and-michael-fassbender-doesnt-appear-to-have-any-limits/

Movies: Bradley Cooper Stars in ‘Limitless’ and Michael Fassbender Doesn’t Appear to Have Any (Limits)
PostDateIcon March 17th, 2011 | PostAuthorIcon Author: admin

Janeeyrerochester
"Mr Rochester's visits are always unexpected."

Guestblogger
NATHANIEL ROGERS

Happy St. Patrick's Day!
You should totally celebrate by finding JANE EYRE this weekend and falling in love with Irish/German Michael Fassbender along with Jane and the rest of the world. While it's possibly true that the sudden collective Fassboner is more publicist command than organic development, it couldn't happen to a better actor. He's the real deal. (See also: Hunger, Fish Tank, Inglourious Basterds for an extraordinarily rangey, complicated star-is-born quadruple.) Fassbender was recently seen filming sex scenes in public [NSFW] for the sex-addiction drama SHAME as if to taunt (or reward?) his millions of new admirers. That future film, which co-stars Carey Mulligan, will reunite him with his Hunger director Steve McQueen. I can't recommend their first collaboration highly enough as their telling of the Irish hunger prison strike in Thatcher era Britain is visceral take-no-prisoners stuff in both direction and performance. Hunger is the kind of film you should only watch with all the lights off and your phone turned off and your hands from the remote control; distractions will ruin its hypnotic commitment.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:16 pm

http://refrigeratorbox.org/?p=3252

JANE EYRE

I remember reading Jane Eyre long ago, perhaps in high school (though not FOR school), and liking it. I remember there being some sort of creepy mystery involving Mr. Rochester’s house, but not what it was. Which is awesome, actually, because it means that when I finally get to see this movie (it probably won’t be until it comes out on DVD) that I’ll be surprised by what happens near the end. Unless of course something before that reminds me how things turn out. I hope nothing does, because I’ve been rather impressed with Mia Wasikowska (she was in Alice in Wonderland), Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Basterds), Jamie Bell (Billy Elliot, The Eagle), and Sally Hawkins (Persuasion, Happy-Go-Lucky) and I really want to see their efforts unencumbered by my own mental images.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:16 pm

http://whysoblu.com/jane-eyre-movie-review/

Plain ‘Jane Eyre’ Has A New Good Looking Adaptation
March 17th, 2011 by Aaron Neuwirth

Jane Eyre is the umpteenth adaptation of the famous English novel by Charlotte Bronte. Strangely, this latest version features the most explosions and gratuitous sex scenes yet. That is a lie; this version of the film is very focused on its visuals. Along with some very good cinematography, the film moves along through visual plot development, as opposed to relying on voice over narration. While I can admire a film, drenched in the Victorian England atmosphere, making it up to me to follow all that is going on, there is also the factor of how invested I felt I wanted to be in the film. Despite fine performances, among other factors, I still remained fairly indifferent towards this film overall, but that doesn’t mean I can’t admire what is being presented.

Edward Rochester: Your gaze is very direct Ms. Eyre, do you think me handsome?

Jane Eyre: No sir.

Edward Rochester: You’re afraid of me.

Jane Eyre: I’m not afraid.

Jane Eyre plays around with its continuity a little bit, but after an extended prologue that will come into play later on, the film straightens out. After experiencing a bleak childhood, complete with harsh relatives (including Sally Hawkins as her spiteful aunt) and very strict schooling, Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska) goes out in the world to become a governess. Set in Victorian England, Jane begins work in the house of Thornfield Hall. There she meets Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench), an elderly widow and housekeeper, who is also seemingly the first person who treats Jane with respect. The master of the house, Mr. Edward Fairfax Rochester (Michael Fassbender), eventually encounters Jane as well.

Rochester is cold, abrupt, and brooding, but finds Jane to be quite unique in the way she addresses him. Rochester is also quite aware of his rugged handsomeness versus Jane’s plainness, but that does not stop him from acknowledging his affections for Jane. Jane soon finds herself falling for Rochester, but there is a mysterious side to him, that may not be to the delight of anyone. A detour also has Jane winding up in the house of clergyman St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell), for a time, which only seems to complicate things further, once more is revealed.

Mia Wasikowska is growing on me. After hearing how good she was on the HBO series In Treatment, I was disappointed to find her as one of the weaker elements in Alice in Wonderland. Then, she returned in the wonderful film, The Kids Are All Right, which made me looking forward to seeing her future roles. Here, she is quite good as the conscientious Jane Eyre. The way she interacts with the different characters of different class and gender is done well enough to create a fine ease with those she can easily speak to and be more on edge take to those she cannot. It is all in the way Jane presents herself in the story, which is to the benefit of the film.

Not much else to be said about the great Michael Fassbender, who is bound to become a huge star by this year’s end, given the number of projects he is involved in (including X-Men: First Class). It is the attitude that Fassbender manages to bring to Rochester that works very well in the film. He has a way of being very forward and surly, as well as mysterious, which is one of the few aspects that kept me intrigued to learn more of his story as the film unfolded. It is also hard not to like Judi Dench, as she is an old pro at making scenes feel more interesting. Jamie Bell’s role in this film follows what the character is supposed to be in the novel; however, I tend to like Bell’s stronger character work in other films, and here he is tasked with playing a pretty whiny character. It is what is required, but I still found it off putting.

The film was directed by Cary Fukunaga, who previously directed the acclaimed Honduran drama, Sin Nombre. For this film, Fukunaga brings a dash of horror like filmmaking to the story. It is enough to keep the film in a fairly somber mood throughout, and it certainly gets you to feel for Jane. It also keeps a subtle layer of suspense, which is aided by the score as well, and seems to attempt to bridge a gap between a period film such as this and the notions of a light thriller. Not being one who is well versed in the story by Charlotte Bronte, beyond a recollection of the plot and the knowledge of the many other adaptations, I am not quite sure how effective the direction reflects the source material. Still, it was made well enough to be quite visually interesting and very stunning in some of the cinematography that has been presented.

Really, what it came down to in how I would assess this film is how involved I was with it and how affecting it felt to me afterward. I can say that I was certainly intrigued by the performances and look of the film, but reflecting on it, I cannot say that I was engaged enough by what I had gathered from this story to really praise it. Writing this now, it has been more than a week since I saw the film, and I have barely thought of it since. I am aware of the cuts that this film made from the original novel, but I am not really sure if that would have made much of a difference to me. Seeing it for the imagery was good enough and Fassbender is an actor I am a big fan of, but I was not as absorbed in the film as I would have liked to have been to really sing its praise. Probably good for fans of the novel, or at least completionists looking to see every adaptation.

Mrs. Fairfax: This is a grand, old house, but it can be a little…dreary.


Written by: Aaron Neuwirth on March 17, 2011.on March 16, 2011.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:19 pm

http://journeytofab.blogspot.com/2011/03/jane-eyre.html

Wednesday, March 16, 2011
Jane Eyre
I went to see the new Jane Eyre this weekend.

I arrived at the Sunshine theatre in the East Village twenty minutes before show time and found myself standing at the end of a long line. I knew immediately the line was probably for Jane Eyre. As I crept forward in line, I kept hearing "sold out" coming from the woman in the ticket booth, but I stayed in line, for whatever reason. I was thinking to myself - rather hoping - that perhaps some other movie was the one that was sold out. I quickly scratched the thought after getting a view of what else was playing. Then I thought that maybe I would purchase tickets for a later showing and cancel my original evning plans (sorry, people I had plans with)... yes, I was that desparate to see me some Michael Fassbender.

Soon I was at the window (most people were getting a clue and jumping ship) and I asked, with disappointment already present, "Jane Eyre?" I was shocked when she responded, "I have one ticket left." I must have looked dumbfounded, so she elaborated, "They just refunded someone's ticket inside." I quickly paid and said something stupid about it being my lucky day. There were only a couple of minutes left before showtime, so I raced into the theatre and trampled some angsty hipsters to get the last good seat (aha! postitive feature of being large).

The movie was beautiful, well-acted, and appropriately tragic. Mia Wasikowska was poised, reserved and heartwrenching. Michael Fassbender was pensive and haunted. That being said, the moments between Mia's Jane and Michael's Rochester were not charged enough for my taste. Perhaps it was my state of mind (I've been feeling a little blue), but Jane seemed too indifferent. After their interactions, the shots of her reactions were sorely understated. It is not that I did not comprehend what Cary Fukunaga was trying to acheive. I think that I just had the stupid female desire to be swept off my feet.

I admit that I have not read the bok. Jane Eyre was not even on my radar until a couple of months ago when I saw the trailer for this latest theatrical adaptation. As soon as I saw the trailer, something about the hinted passion and angst (second time I used that word) lit a fire in me. I immediately rented the Toby Stephens' BBC version and loved it! But it was probably too chipper and sunshine for what the story really is.

Overall, I would recommend you seeing it.

Also, check out the W Magazine cover and photo shoot featuring the Jane Eyre stars:

http://www.wmagazine.com/celebrities/2011/04/mia_wasikowska_michael_fassbender_jane_eyre
Posted by Missy N at 4:13 PM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:24 pm

http://bigfanboy.com/wp/?p=6767

JANE EYRE (starring Mia Wasikowska & Michael Fassbender) review by Gary Murray
By
Gary Murray
Published: March 16, 2011

JANE EYRE (starring Mia Wasikowska & Michael Fassbender) review by Gary Murray

Jane Eyre is one of those books that high school students are made to read. The Bronte story has been analyzed time and time again by youngsters trying to figure out symbolism and substance while struggling over language. It has also been made into at least five different filmed versions. The latest is by Cary Fukunaga.

The story starts with a young woman escaping through the moors and away from Thornfield Hall. She is found by a family of servants, two women and a young man St John Rivers (Jamie Bell). They feed her and help get her a job at the local school.

Then we go back to the beginning. Jane Eyre is a girl who has been orphaned and left with her relation (Sally Hawkins). When Jane stands-up for herself, she is sent away to boarding school and banned to stay on holidays. Soon, she is shunned but still makes a single friend.

After the adventures in school, our young adult Jane (Mia Wasikowska) lands a position as Governess at Thornfield Hall. Jane is to teach a young French girl Adele (Romy Settbon Moore). Her father is always away on business and Jane finds comfort with the head housekeeper Mrs. Fairbanks (Judi Dench). One day the master of the house Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender) comes home. He is smitten by Jane, who never backs down in presenting her opinions.

The story of Jane Eyre is of her falling for a man above her stature. What starts out as friendship blooms into something more. It is also about a dark secret in Thornfield Hall and the romance between Rochester and a lady of bearing and wealth. The triangle of love between the star-crossed drives the movie.

The only part of this version of Jane Eyre I enjoyed was the performance of Mia Wasikowska. She captures the mousey innocence of the role while keeping the strong backbone of the character. Her wide-eyed portrayal lends itself to the material and she is believable in the period piece.

The same cannot be said for our two male leads. Jamie Bell is a solid actor and brings his A-game to even mediocre flicks. Here, his role seems little more than an overblown cameo. He is in and out of the movie so fast that one wonders how he received such a high billing. When the big finish happens with his character, it is as unexpected as it is forced. Michael Fassbender has the same problems with his character. No one believes the turn of his Rochester and the performance comes off as phony. One never truly understands the attraction between any of the leads; it all comes across as weak.

The supporting women in Jane Eyre fair much better. Judi Dench is spot-on wonderful as Mrs. Fairbanks, the stern taskmaster of the house. She is much wiser than she lets on and tries to be the mother figure of Jane, warning her of the evils of rich men. With so little to do, Sally Hawkins’ part could have been given to a much less accomplished actress. But in her frail hands, she delivers some emotional punches and abject sorrows.

There are some major problems with Jane Eyre, all falling on the shoulders of director Cary Fukunaga. He never finds the romance between Jane and Rochester. There is no passion with glances, no steamy desire. When the two touch, there should be some electricity instead of the dull thud delivered. The other problem with the film is that it looks horrible. The lighting is flat and the colors dull. We get no sense of warmth in the background and it affects the characters in the foreground. One wonders just how such a flat flick could have been approved.

This version will never stand head and shoulders above the rest. Arguably, the best version is the 1944 adaptation with Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles. But if this take helps kids discover the novel, then it is worth the task.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:25 pm

http://takimag.com/article/an_agreeably_plain_jane_eyre/print

An Agreeably Plain Jane Eyre

by Steve Sailer

March 16, 2011
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An Agreeably Plain Jane Eyre

Mia Wasikowska

The latest movie adaptation of Jane Eyre is slowly rolling out nationally via art-house theaters, but the plot of Charlotte Brontë’s three-volume novel remains wonderfully commercial.

The spookily pale Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) plays the poor but plucky governess, while Michael Fassbender is her rich but moody employer, the Byronic Mr. Rochester.

Wasikowska, 21, is made up to look as old-fashioned and Plain Jane as possible. When illuminated by candlelight, she resembles the subject of a Vermeer painting or of Leonardo’s Lady with an Ermine. Wasikowska delivers her dialogue with the impassioned precision required to render Brontë’s highly august lines comprehensible: “If God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me as it is now for me to leave you.”

Appropriately for Mr. Rochester, whose secret misfortune has led to dissipation, Fassbender is 33 but looks 40. In a role made famous by Orson Welles in 1944, this previously obscure actor is also terrific.

Dame Judi Dench portrays Mr. Rochester’s head housekeeper, a character rather like Angela Lansbury’s Mrs. Potts in Disney’s cartoon Beauty and the Beast. Indeed, Jane Eyre resembles a sternly Victorian feminist retelling of that famous fairytale.
“What we are left with seems rather like Jane Eyre if Jane Austen had written it.”

In the Brontë sisters’ annus mirabilis of 1847, Emily Brontë’s wilder, crazier Wuthering Heights took longer to catch on, while Charlotte’s Jane Eyre was an immediate bestseller.

The primary markets for 19th-century novels were commercial lending libraries, which operated much like the now-fading Blockbuster video stores. They preferred novels that were long enough to be split into three books, each of which could be lent out simultaneously. This gave Charlotte a sizable canvas.

In an era when images were expensive to reproduce and novelists were paid to create pictures in the mind, Charlotte went a little lighter than expected on the landscape descriptions, leaving her more room for story. So she shoved in every damn thing imaginable, mashing up numerous genres—romance, social criticism, Bildungsroman, Gothic horror, and even proto-detective. Yet somehow, Charlotte made it compulsively readable.

Some of the plot will seem peculiar today, such as that staple of Victorian literature, the (164-year-old Spoiler Alert!) unexpected bequest of a fortune by a distant relative. By making Jane Eyre an heir, this windfall allows the heroine to marry Mr. Rochester not as a Cinderella, but as an equal partner in that emerging Victorian England ideal: the companionate marriage of two intertwined souls.

Not many people in the 21st century are lucky enough to receive a surprise inheritance. Then again, not many of us are unlucky enough to have all our more likely heirs die before us. The high death rates among the young in 19th-century England would more often trigger a series of increasingly implausible if-then-else instructions written into wills.

The topic of inheritances seems strikingly underexploited in 21st-century fiction. We like to think we’re beyond all that. Unlike 19th-century heroines such as Jane Eyre and Elizabeth Bennet in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, we simply go out and earn our own fortunes. Yet in my own experience, the question of who inherits what remains a hot button, albeit one we consider distasteful to push.

The main question in adapting Jane Eyre into a 115-minute movie is what to exclude. This latest Jane Eyre skimps on the novel’s more Romantic and Gothic aspects, such as the ghostly scratching on the walls of the isolated country estate. Similarly, Jane’s gift (or curse) of hearing loved ones’ voices in her head is reduced to one tasteful scene. Mr. Rochester’s dog Pilot, a significant figure in the book, gets merely a cursory shout-out at the end. The most bizarre plot twist, Rochester cross-dressing as a Gypsy fortune-teller, is tastefully excised.

What we are left with seems rather like Jane Eyre if Jane Austen had written it. Austen, who died in 1817, was a witty, levelheaded product of the 18th century. She would have gotten along well with Ben Franklin. In contrast, the Brontës were the quintessence of the 19th century’s Romantic mood.

After the neo-Romanticism of the 1960s-70s, tastes have moved away from the Brontës and toward Austen. (The name “Emma,” Austen’s second-most-famous heroine, was merely the 448th most popular girl’s baby name in the 1970s. By 2003, it was the 2nd.) Thus, the new movie features much about the Austen-like topics of class and gender battles. Fassbender’s Mr. Rochester comes across more like a bigger, bolder version of Pride and Prejudice’s Mr. Darcy than like Wuthering Heights’ demonic Heathcliff. Yet Jane Eyre is so expansive and lively a source that this rendition remains authentic and entertaining.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:26 pm

http://www.filmjournal.com/filmjournal/content_display/reviews/specialty-releases/e3ic620932ad3405aa439332c05d962b096

Film Review: Jane Eyre
Lovers of Charlotte Bronte's classic will luxuriate in the spooky Gothic atmosphere, but the film's pallid Jane fails to nail a character who changed how women view themselves.

March 16, 2011

-By Erica Abeel

It takes either industrial-strength confidence or simple chutzpah to tackle a film remake of Jane Eyre, the beloved 1847 novel by Charlotte Bronte that no less a figure than Virginia Woolf declared un-putdownable. There exist 18 film versions of Jane—the 1944 one with Joan Fontaine especially memorable—and nine made for television. Now, with only one feature behind him—the affecting Sin Nombre, about immigrant migrations—33-year-old Cary Fukunaga delivers his own take on the iconic tale, casting Mia Wasikowska as Jane, Michael Fassbender as Edward Rochester, Judi Dench as his goodhearted housekeeper, and some prize English real estate playing itself.

Fassbender and Dench are stellar actors who can hardly put a foot wrong, and the foggy expanses and howling winds of the Derbyshire dales, where much of the film was shot, are a filmmaker's best friend. Sadly, though, this Jane Eyre, though visually stunning, is a kind of classics-lite version, punching up the Gothic horror aspect of the story while stumbling in its attempt to capture its indelible characters. The film's weakest link is Wasikowska in a crucial bit of miscasting.

Fukunaga includes the touchstones common to all the previous film versions: Rochester thrown by his spooked horse; the screams at night and the burning bed chamber; Jane running across the barren moors. And the script closely follows the original story. The orphaned Jane is raised by her cruel aunt (Sally Hawkins, cast against type) and does time in the harrowing Lowood school before being accepted as a governess—the period's avenue for penurious women—in Thornfield, the hulking manse of the brooding, Byronic Mr. Rochester. There, Jane dares to imagine, rightly, that she has formed a deep connection with the master of the house, despite competition from the alluring, beribboned Blanche Ingram (Imogen Poots), a woman of Rochester's social class. But after discovering the nasty business in Rochester's attic, Jane lights out for the moors, finding shelter in the austere home of cleric St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his sisters. There, she weighs the role of missionary's wife that he offers against unfinished business at Thornfield.

Rather than follow the novel's linear storyline, screenwriter Moira Buffini chooses to tell most of the story in flashback, beginning with Jane's year-long stay with Rivers, a section that in the novel arrives late. Theoretically, this strategy brushes the cobwebs off the narrative and pitches you straight into Jane's crisis, catering to today's impatience with a leisurely rollout. But Buffini's shuffled timeline sometimes proves confusing; even viewers familiar with the novel may initially struggle to determine past from present.

The film's major misstep, though, is the casting of It-Girl Wasikowska. True, she did credible work in The Kids Are All Right, and at 18, she's exactly Jane's age. But Wasikowska doesn't yet have the acting chops to capture a character whose insistence on her own self-worth, seemingly arrived from nowhere, announced a revolutionary new heroine. She loses us from the earliest scenes, when she huddles weeping in the bracken and you half expect her to text, “OMG, there's some old freak in the attic.”

Wasikowska's underpowered turn makes Rochester's attraction to her somewhat implausible. In the crucial scenes where they match wits and she keeps her dignity despite her lowly status, he hasn't enough to play against. You wonder why he doesn't just hit the Continent with saucy Blanche Ingram. And the always-charismatic Fassbender has been misdirected to make Rochester seem more like a studio exec with heartburn than a man tormented by a tragic mistake. Wasikowska, with her abbreviated face, oddly reminiscent of Jeremy Renner, and Fassbender, with his great leonine head, are also physically mismatched and seem spliced together from two different movies.

Still, this Jane Eyre will likely find an audience among those hungry for a Bronte fix, as well as fans of Gothic atmosphere and tropes from horror films. In fact, perhaps the film's true stars are towering, dank Haddon Hall as Thornfield, the go-to pile for English period films, and those undulating moors that make romantics of us all. The tech package is superb, using natural lighting for the fog-wreathed cliffs and dark bracken, and fireplaces, candles and oil lanterns for the interiors.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:34 pm

http://gallimauphry.blogspot.com/2011/03/new-jane.html

Friday, March 18, 2011
A New Jane

Talbot's The Fruit Sellers, ca 1845, from Wikipedia Commons.
 William Henry Fox Talbot [a contemporary of Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype] left a legacy of fascinating of English photographs called calotypes, a process he patented in 1841. The unique look of Talbot's work was obviously the inspiration for the 2011 BBC film version of Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender.

I have to admit, I've fallen a bit in love with Miss Wasikowska, who is indeed an 1840s beauty. Thin and brooding, she conveys not only Jane's strength but also her passion. When Rochester asks her about her sad story, we know the depth of her refusal to share her secrets with him. Fassbender, the Romantic and mysterious Rochester makes a great match for Jane. It is great pleasure also to see Dame Judi Dench as the housekeeper.

I have seen countless film versions of the book, this version with its marvelous sense of period and look, totally enchanted me. I can't wait to see it again.


Articles on the film:

* Jane Eyre: a plain, naturally lit, refreshingly un-Gothic adaptation.
* Costume Designer Reveals Secrets Behind Wasikowska's Wardrobe

Posted by David at 3:53 PM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:35 pm

http://mariesmovies.blogspot.com/2011/03/review-jane-eyre-2011.html

Friday, March 18, 2011
REVIEW: Jane Eyre (2011)
Jane Eyre (2011). Dir: Cary Fukunaga. Starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell. IMDB.

First of all, Jane Eyre the novel is one of my all-time favorite reads; I've been re-reading it this year and have been anticipating the new movie for months. So you know I went to see it at the very first opportunity, which was last night at the Boston advance screening. The theater was packed, and the film was fantastic.

Director Cary Fukunaga tells the story starting from about 2/3 of the way through the actual narrative; it's difficult to set the story up without spoiling it somewhat but I'll try. The very first shot is Jane leaving a house; she travels into the countryside by herself, and collapses on the doorstep of the Rivers family- sisters Diana and Mary, and brother St. John, kind people who take her in. As she recovers, we learn her story in flashback- her unhappy childhood, her dismal school years and the romance at the center of the story (and her life), with Mr. Rochester of Thornfield Hall.

Of course the love story takes up most of the space in the movie; even at 2 hours and change, there's not enough time to incorporate all the detail of Charlotte Brontë's wonderful novel so Fukunaga has to trim. Her childhood and school years are greatly abbreviated, as is the very end of the story, but for the most part I thought that his choices were judicious. The movie looks incredible- the outdoor scenes are richly atmospheric and I could almost feel the breezes and rains and hailstorms cutting through the screen. And the actors are terrific, too. I loved Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender as Jane and Rochester; they have a great on-screen chemistry and Wasikowska is now my favorite Jane. Fassbender was wonderful but nobody can replace Timothy Dalton- sorry.

Overall? Fukunaga's Jane Eyre is a winning adaptation of a true literary classic. I can't wait to see it again! Jane Eyre fans will love it and those who haven't read the book but enjoy artsy literary love stories should see it, too.

I'm a Fandango affiliate and receive a small commission on sales.
Posted by Marie at 1:30 PM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:35 pm

http://www.jaysmovieblog.com/2011/03/next-week-in-tickets-films-playing_18.html

Friday, March 18, 2011
Next Week in Tickets: Films playing Boston 18 March 2011 - 24 March 2011
What we have here is a week in which I clearly have to stop whining about how my new commute messes with my moviegoing and start finding ways to work around it, because there's a ton of stuff that looks like it might be worth seeing and a clear reason not to put it off.

Jane Eyre also opens up at the Coolidge Corner Theatre. Early on, its previews and advertising got some negative buzz from English lit crowds for making it look like a horror movie, but I've got to admit - it's some of the most effective advertising for a period/literary classic I've ever seen. An impressive cast (Mia Wasikowska, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins, Judy Dench, Michael Fassbender) and direction by Sin Nombre's Cary Fukunaga doesn't seem to hurt, either.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:37 pm

http://www.patriotledger.com/features/x698058795/MOVIE-REVIEW-Retelling-of-classic-Jane-Eyre-elevated-by-winning-performances

MOVIE REVIEW: Retelling of classic 'Jane Eyre' elevated by winning performances

TPL-MOV_JANE EYRE 761.jpg
Focus Features
Mia Wasikowska in "Jane Eyre."

By Al Alexander
The Patriot Ledger
Posted Mar 18, 2011 @ 04:33 PM

If you’re going to take on the needless task of creating the 28th – yes, 28th – film version of Charlotte Bronte’s romantic classic “Jane Eyre,” by god, you’d better make it good, if not memorable. Lucky for up-and-coming director Cary Joji Fukunaga, he scores on both counts. But it is, nonetheless, an unnecessary retelling of an oft-told story.

I’ll continue to feel that way until somebody conjures a more imaginative approach to the material than Robert Stevenson accomplished with his quintessential 1943 version starring Orson Welles, Joan Fontaine, Margaret O’Brien and a 12-year-old Liz Taylor. That one had it all: mystery, suspense and a compelling story about how the past affects the now. It was so good, I easily overlooked the fact that Fontaine was probably a little long in the tooth to be playing the 19-year-old title character.

No such problem here with the much-sought-after Mia Wasikowska allowing Jane’s tattered soul to inhabit her 21-year-old body. And, with a significant assist from the make-up department, forgoing her glamorous beauty for a look that is unmistakably dowdy.

I suspect the reason the role has traditionally been filled by older actresses is because few younger ones possess the maturity and life experience required to inhabit the soul of a woman who has been denied love at every turn in her brief, torturous life. But Wasikowska more than proves she has the chops to pull it off.

As does Michael Fassbender, who follows his jolly-good turn as a movie-loving RAF officer in “Inglourious Basterds” with a haunting portrayal of Edward Rochester, the mysterious baron Jane falls for after she goes to work for him as his ward’s governess. The two actors create a smoldering chemistry that is as palpable as it is potent. When they share the screen, “Jane Eyre” sizzles with forbidden pleasures, as the forlorn lord of the ominous Thornfield Manor becomes smitten with a servant half his age. All the while, closely guarding the dirty little secret he keeps locked away in the attic.

If you’ve read “Jane Eyre” or seen any of its 27 previous adaptations on the small and large screens, then this one holds no surprises other than the way it’s been restructured to take place entirely in flashback. Otherwise, the story is exactly as you remembered it with Jane Eyre orphaned at a young age, entrusted to the care of her father’s witch of a sister-in-law, Mrs. Reed (a wonderfully cruel Sally Hawkins), before being sent off to a sadistic boarding school, where she suffers many heartbreaks and humiliations before finally ending up on the doorstep of Thornfield Manor.

Fukunaga, following up on his much-praised tale of Central Americans making a run for the U.S. border in “Sin Nombre,’ handles these early scenes masterfully, stoking our anger toward Jane’s repressors, while also building our affection for his heroine’s resilience against a stacked deck.

Where Fukunaga and screenwriter Moira Buffini run afoul is in their inability to summon the heart and emotion required to give resonance to the inevitable tragedies awaiting their star-crossed lovers. You wind up shrugging when you should being reaching for the Kleenex. They also fail to build the mystery and suspense surrounding the strange occurrences each night inside the manor. That’s inexcusable, especially when so many people in the audience are already privy to the source of those strange happenings.

Yet, the film succeeds thanks to the fine work by Wasikowska and Fassbender, as well as a supporting cast that includes Judi Dench as Mr. Rochester’s benevolent housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax; Jamie Bell as a love-struck missionary who befriends Jane; and Imogen Poots as Blanche Ingram, the beautiful socialite threatening to steal Mr. Rochester away.

The sets by Will Hughes-Jones and the Victorian-era costumes by Michael O’Connor are equally spot-on, as is the splendid cinematography by Adriano Goldman, who uses fog, rain and forbidding landscapes to fully enhance the Gothic aspects of a story about love in gloom.

Still, as winning as this “Jane Eyre” is, there’s no getting around the fact that it’s just OK, not great. But when the alternative is romantic drivel like “Red Riding Hood” and the “Twilight” travesties (which play off “Wuthering Heights” by Bronte’s sister, Emily) this “Jane” is hardly plain.

JANE EYRE (PG-13) Cast includes Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, Jamie Bell and Imogen Poots. Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. At Kendall Square, Cambridge. 3 stars out of 4.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 8:06 pm

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2y2CUR/www.ihavenet.com/movies/Jane-Eyre-Movie-Review-Mia-Wasikowska-and-Michael-Fassbender.html

Jane Eyre (3 Stars)
Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender

The pretty, moody, well-acted new adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" rests on a key early scene between Mia Wasikowska, as Bronte's protagonist and narrator, and Michael Fassbender, as the storm warning known as Edward Rochester.

This is one of the most famous getting-to-know-you passages in 19th century literature, chronicling the second encounter and first civil conversation between the new governess of Thornfield Hall and her employer.

With a disarming mixture of candor and restraint, Jane acquits herself so nimbly in the face of so much bluff, it's as if the charismatic bad boy with a secret were discovering a new species -- a rare object of fascination and adoration.

Thanks to the enduring draw of Bronte's 1847 two-volume novel, generation upon generation of readers have made the same discovery.

Without making any provocative new discoveries, the latest film version of the novel, directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, honors the source material. It's certainly a start and, if you have the right actors, sometimes it's enough for a satisfying finish.

We'll get to what's missing from this "Jane Eyre" in a minute. Here's what works, and what makes it worth seeing.

For starters, Wasikowska. If the actress playing Jane Eyre, the only potential pity party in popular fiction to rival Oliver Twist, begs for our sympathy in any direct fashion, the story dies faster than you can say "Helen Burns." Bronte's Jane is bullied, beaten, cowed, humiliated and -- worst of all -- marginalized by her guardians, her Lowood schoolmasters and the wider world around her. Then she arrives at Thornfield Hall and her destiny.

Wasikowska, who starred in the recent "Alice in Wonderland" and co-starred in "The Kids Are All Right," has many virtues as an actress, but above all, she is as honest as the day is long. She seems to act very little, which sounds lazy or easy, but in fact requires great skill. Fassbender's Rochester has the dash and spirit of a Byronic antihero; crucially, he also has a sense of humor about his harrumphing character's unexpected attraction to this pale, watchful governess. In their lengthy scene by the fireside Wasikowska and Fassbender appear to be sussing each other out, pushing each other's buttons, in all the right ways. It is a crisply paced highlight.

The screenwriter Moira Buffini has restructured Bronte's narrative so that the story begins near the end, and then flashes back. This works well. What is lacking? I hesitate to use the most hackneyed two words in English, but: character development. The 1944 Robert Stevenson version of "Jane Eyre," a wild-eyed, visually striking black-and-white affair starring Joan Fontaine (post-"Rebecca") and Orson Welles (more effective in his uncredited design contributions than in his performance), has many flaws, but its screenplay manages a gradual and convincing coming-together of the main characters. This latest version radically condenses the process. Here, it's one scene and bam: love, hard and fast. Bronte wrote of the "cord of communion" between Jane and Rochester, pulling them toward one another almost against their will. The movie gives that cord a strong yank early on -- too strong, I think.

Director Fukunaga's previous film was "Sin Nombre," about Honduran nationals trekking north, perilously, to Mexico and eventually America. That film's mixture of realism and melodrama was very much like the unsteady world Fukunaga creates in "Jane Eyre," veering from windswept, hand-held-camera walks against the gray skyline of Derbyshire to classically minded camera swoops and glides. The results are all over the place visually.

And to no one's surprise, the story still works like Gothic gangbusters, thanks in part to reliable backcourt support from Judi Dench (as Mrs. Fairfax) and Sally Hawkins (as Jane's venal guardian). I couldn't help but feel this adaptation needed more of the thing for which Jane herself yearns: a sense of freedom. At their best, though, Wasikowska and Fassbender hint at their well-worn characters' inner lives, which are complex, unruly and impervious to time.

"Jane Eyre" Movie Trailer

MPAA rating: PG-13 (for thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content).

Running time: 2:00.

Cast: Mia Wasikowska (Jane Eyre); Michael Fassbender (Edward Rochester); Judi Dench (Mrs. Fairfax); Jamie Bell (St. John Rivers); Imogen Poots (Blanche Ingram); Amelia Clarkson (Jane, age 10); Sally Hawkins (Mrs. Reed).

Credits: Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga; written by Moira Buffini, based on the novel by Charlotte Bronte; produced by Alison Owen and Paul Trijbits. A Focus Features release.
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