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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:54 pm

http://www.ralphsmoviereviews.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Saturday, April 9, 2011
JANE EYRE

Romantic drama

PRINCIPAL CAST MEMBERS
Mia Wasikowska: 19-year-old Jane Eyre (pronounced jane air)
Jamie Bell: Reverend St. John Rivers
Holliday Grainger: one of his sisters Diana
Tamzin Merchant: the other sister Mary
Michael Fassbender: wealthy Edward Fairfax Rochester
Judi Dench: his housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax
Romy Settbon Moore: 10-year-old or so Adele

REVIEW
Full disclosure: the story definitely has more appeal to women so keep that in mind when considering the following “unbiased” review.

This latest effort from the BBC Studios proves once again that no one does period drama better than the British in terms of high production values.

However it comes up short in four other areas:
1. The English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge said that “if a writer could infuse human interest and a semblance of truth into a fantastic tale then likely the reader would suspend judgment concerning the implausibility of the narrative”. Certainly that is a requirement with regard to the romantic aspect of the story. In a word, it does not ring true.
2. The acting is all over the place: Wasikowska and Judi Dench are great, Fassbender does a decent job but Sally Hawkins is rather lacklustre.
3. The film goes on far too long at just over two hours.
4. But worst than that they squandered away a key element as one audience member so succinctly put it “the ending is far too abrupt and not nearly as satisfying as in the original novel by Charlotte Brontë”.

CLASSIFICATION
for some thematic elements including a nude image (it’s a painting for Pete’s sake, why so harsh?) and brief violent content (very brief and not very violent).
Posted by Ralph at 12:55 PM
Labels: Romantic drama
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:54 pm

http://aheadonourway.wordpress.com/2011/04/09/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Anything but plain

It has been a long time, maybe forever, since I attended a movie that drew actual gasping and sobbing from the audience. Nothing surprises us anymore. Maybe it’s something about the clientele of an independent theatre vs. Regal (the latter of which makes one cry because of the ticket/concession prices, not the quality of the film). Regardless, Cary Fukunaga’s film adaptation of Jane Eyre, based upon Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 Gothic novel, made that happen.

For those of you non-literary readers (a term which seems backwards and perverse in and of itself), the first thing to note about Jane Eyre is that the novel is not simply a period romance, which is how it has been adapted in about twenty-four films and TV specials. The novel itself is a Bildungsroman story featuring elements of Gothic horror and social criticism, and is most notably one of the earliest examples of the phrase “ahead of its time”: a gorgeous work of literature featuring a self-reliant female protagonist. Jane is highly moral, but mature and individualistic, capable of evolving on her own, never appearing as a damsel in distress, never in need of rescue. Fukunaga remembers all of this.

The story follows Jane Eyre, of course, played in this version by the staggeringly talented Mia Wasikowska (about whom I gushed in my Alice in Wonderland piece). Growing up in the house of her horrid aunt, Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins), Jane is frequently abused, physically and mentally. Reticence, however, is not in Jane’s vocabulary. She educates herself, sneaking a look at books when no one is around, as well as talking (and striking) back when provoked by her cousins. As a result, she is told that she is deceitful, and is sent off to a special girls’ school. Fukunaga gives us these early sections of the story in the form of flashbacks, with the interest of showing us that Wasikowska plays the version of Jane with whom we’ll be spending the most time. This shifts the linear storytelling of the novel, but in the film, it’s not terribly distracting. It’s not terribly needed either, but there you go. With one thing and another, Jane becomes Governess at Thornfield Manor, teaching the young ward of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender), with whom she will eventually fall in love, and befriending the aging housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench).

An amazing aspect of this film is that it retains the storytelling point of view of the novel: Jane Eyre is told from Jane’s perspective. In the film, we never get a scene without Jane. Mia Wasikowska (and to a lesser but nearly as powerful degree, young Amelia Clarkson) carries this entire film on her shoulders. Often, in films like these, it’s ninety percent first-person, then the filmmaker caves in because (s)he can’t figure out how to tell an important piece of exposition without cutting away from the established perspective – not here. We’re always with Jane, and more importantly, we want to stay with her.

Michael Fassbender appears as the story’s Byronic hero, and does so with a humor that makes us love Mr. Rochester but never even approaches the fourth wall, as many period pieces feel they must. As a friend put it, “Fassbender not playing a douchebag in a military uniform, for once?” Yes, and it’s magical to watch. This film’s release was limited, but I’m holding out hope that the two leads will get the recognition they deserve from these performances. Appropriately, Rochester’s apparent love interest, Blanche Ingram (Imogen Poots) actually sings one of Lord Byron’s musical pieces. Everything from the score, the architecture and the atmosphere to the social and scientific assumptions of the time period are retained. Judi Dench, as usual, is sweet and grandmotherly, and can set the tone of an entire scene with one facial expres​sion(one that comes to mind is the scene in which Mrs. Fairfax first sees Jane and Rochester together). Jamie Bell also appears as Jane’s cousin (a detail left out in the film), the pious St. John Rivers, who takes Jane in after her unceremonious exeunt from Thornfield.

Fiction writer David Jauss suggests, in his essay, Autobiographobia: Writing and the Secret Life, that we authors of fiction try to write our way into characters whose lives we know nothing about. On paper, we become different people. In Charlotte’s time, she was writing about herself – Jane Eyre, judging from what we know, mirrors Charlotte as a person in the most striking of ways (often summed up in brusque phrases such as “a woman with a strong heart,” but take from it what you will). If I may be so bold, I think if Charlotte had lived to see the dawn of film, or hadn’t passed away with an unborn child, she/her descendants would have been more pleased with Fukunaga’s adaptation of the story and Mia Wasikowska’s portrayal of Jane than any version of either done before.

It might be worth mentioning that in Charlotte’s time, people were still figuring things outs – things like the way sound travels. In several sections of the story, Jane hears voices, the most important of which occurs when she hears Rochester calling her name and decides to return to him. In all our romanticizing, we forget that in this period of the world, people weren’t sure this kind of thing wasn’t possible – that you couldn’t hear someone calling your name softly from leagues away. In this adaptation of Jane Eyre, I promise you’ll hear Charlotte’s, just a little.

Jane Eyre (2011); written by Moira Buffini, based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë; directed by Cary Fukukaga; starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench and Jamie Bell.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:04 pm

http://www.abg-nakal.co.cc/2011/04/shame-movie-2011.html

April 9, 2011
Jane Eyre (2011)
by Ian Drury

Charlotte Brontë’s novel, Jane Eyre, has been adapted to the screen numerous times to varying degrees of success. Director Cary Fukunaga’s take on the story is very true to the source material, but with an added sense of passion and desire exhibited from the central characters. Jane Eyre is played by Mia Wasikowska (of Alice and Wonderland fame) and she is very good here, practically carrying the entire film; not one scene is shown outside of her point-of-view. She gives a subtle and nuanced performance, underplaying her emotions, leaving much of what she's feeling to what we as the audience know must be happening beneath the surface. Michael Fassbender gives an endearing portrayal of Edward Rochester, though his interpretation of the character feels at times less eccentric than some previous performances. The supporting cast is terrific as well, featuring strong acting from the child actors and especially Sally Hawkins as the malicious Aunt, Mrs. Reed, and Judi Dench as the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (because it doesn’t quite feel like a period piece without Dame Judi Dench).

The movie begins with a near dead Jane stumbling into the home of St. John Rivers (Jaime Bell) and his two sisters, where she slowly recuperates. The story is mostly told via flashback following Jane Eyre’s life from a childhood devoid of affection to her eventual employment as governess for Rochester’s young ward. The flashbacks make the childhood memories fairly brief, leaving a bit to be desired for establishing the character of Jane Eyre, but enough is understood to appreciate her independent spirit and passionate nature. She is a woman trapped by the social norms of society, yearning to be free and completely self-reliant. She knows next to nothing of the world outside her school and everywhere she ends up is like a cage (a point that is brought up several times throughout the film). Her job as governess is where the bulk of the plot focuses its attention. The most interesting scenes are those between Jane and Rochester, their banter being sharp and always concealing their true feelings. Unlike some other adaptations, it becomes much clearer here that they have feelings for each other from their first meeting. Given the forceful and brooding nature of Mr. Rochester, more time is usually spent on the two characters getting to know each other. That is not the case in this version however. Here, it’s almost love at first sight. The two leads perform well together, their dialogue seemingly matched with one another’s in terms of both wit and intelligence (it helps that Fassbender doesn’t completely dominate the film as Orson Welles did in the 1944 version), and their initial meeting by the fire place creates sparks quickly. This gives their entire romance a heightened sense of passion and restrained desire, but in spite of this, the film is relatively slow paced. Fukunaga spends a great deal of time and effort establishing a mood and creating a strong sense of atmosphere. He captures the mystery and barely contained emotion of the gothic romance perfectly. The cinematography is also terrific and there are many shots depicting the isolation of Rochester’s mansion, showing off the vast and empty surroundings, mirroring Jane's loneliness in the world. The mansion itself is a dark and gloomy setting, much time being spent wandering around it with only a candle to light the way. It’s highly stylized, the way it’s filmed, and there is plenty to look at. At one point, there is a montage sequence that, accompanied by only the soft music of a piano, strongly resembles a scene out of a Terrence Malick film.

I think that my biggest problem with this film is that it doesn’t do enough to distinguish itself from previous adaptations, or other romantic period pieces in general. Much of it felt familiar and even bordering on the routine. While that’s not to say that this is a bad film (because its certainty not), in the end it feels kind of unnecessary. The story is still intriguing, but this is a famous story that is interesting in many of its forms. Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre is a strong adaptation with some excellent performances, but if you’ve seen other film adaptations of the story, chances are that this one won’t be a revelation to you.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:07 pm

http://thismovieguy.blogspot.com/2011/04/movie-review-jane-eyre.html

Friday, April 8, 2011
Movie Review: JANE EYRE
JANE EYRE
2011
PG-13

Jane Eyre is a 2011 drama directed by Cary Fukunaga. It's an adaptation of the 1847 Charlotte Brontë novel of the same name. The film mostly plays through flashbacks as the titular character (Mia Wasikowska) remembers how her life progressed and how she found herself in the stead of a young priest named St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his two sisters. The audience learns that Jane was placed in an all-girls home after her aunt accused her of being a liar, and the time she spends in the institution hardens her resolve. Upon leaving the home, Jane finds work as a governess at Thornfield Hall, home to a mysterious Edward Fairfax Rochester (Michael Fassbender), where she takes to teaching Rochester's French-speaking daughter. Eventually, Rochester returns home and meets Jane; he soon takes a liking to her, and the pair go back-and-forth with their affections and their loyalties. As time progresses, however, the feelings they have for one another cannot be withheld. Unfortunately, it turns out that Rochester may have a secret or two hidden deep within the walls of his eerie mansion estate...

I was originally drawn to this film for two reasons. The first reason stems from the fact that I actually acted in my high school theater department's rendition of Jane Eyre during my junior year. Although I only had bit roles here and there, I still remember my few scenes on-stage (although I never could tell you the storyline for the life of me). The second reason I wanted to see this film was for director Cary Fukunaga. It's only his second feature-length directorial effort, but I absolutely loved his first one (2009's Sin Nombre), so I figured I'd give him another shot and see if he was just a one-hit wonder, so to speak. While Jane Eyre doesn't quite reach the power than Sin Nombre possessed, I'd have to say that Fukunaga could be a director to watch in the future.

I had a couple of issues with the film, but nothing was terribly pressing. The screenplay works well, and it offers a good look at the ups and downs of the love between Jane and Rochester. I wouldn't say it provides twists and turns, but there's definitely little tweaks here and there for those unfamiliar with the storyline. It's a very effective dramatic romance, but I felt like the story moved a little too slowly for my personal tastes. The two-hour flick seemed like it dragged on for a lot longer than that, and it was difficult for me to maintain my interest throughout its entirety. One of my biggest beefs with movies is when they can't hook me from the start, and Jane Eyre never entirely hooked me. I've seen snails move faster than this one.

That being said, we actually get a pretty good acting ensemble in the flick. Wasikowska is starting to stamp herself as one of the better young leading ladies on the Hollywood scene. If you haven't seen her work, you don't have to look far: she starred as the titular character in 2010's Alice in Wonderland and played a semi-lead in 2010's The Kids Are All Right. Look for her to make a splash with awards season in the coming years. Michael Fassbender, who has quickly become one of my favorite actors, also does well with his role as Rochester, but I think he's a little upstaged by Wasikowska. We've also got a decent performance by Dame Judi Dench in a supporting role, but she isn't given much reign with the character. Overall, the acting is quite good - at least, it's better than the average fare you'll find in cinemas at any given time.

At the end of the day, Jane Eyre is a decent dramatic romance flick that will definitely appeal to my female readers more than it did for myself. Up until the minute before the movie started, I was the only guy in the theater, so you can tell who the target demographic probably is. That's not to say I didn't enjoy it; it's a good movie that just moved a little too slow for my own tastes, but that doesn't mean you won't love it (if you're into some romance).

Movie Review Summary:
Grade: B-
1 Thumb Up
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:08 pm

http://bryanjbrooks.wordpress.com/2011/04/09/on-screen-jane-eyre/

On-Screen: Jane Eyre | *****
Posted on April 9, 2011 by bjbrooks

Jane Eyre | 2011 | Cary Fukunaga | Focus Features

Absent from 2010, the ravishing-English-literature-classic-remake returns in 2011, well, ravishingly with the twenty-somethingth adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Gothic-Feminist-Romance masterpiece, Jane Eyre. A (indeed, the only) book I’ve read three times, Ms. Brontë’s tale in some ways lends itself to the cinematic. The Gothic undertones of much of the book beg to be rendered visually, and suspenseful and violent episodes dart out from the more constrained and corseted conversations of lonely English countryside dwellers. Yet the novel’s density of theme and character challenge the compactness of film in ways novels like those of Jane Austen, content with their characters and comedies of manners (no fault, I tell you) do not. The veritable success of three of Austen’s films (Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Persuasion have all made it onto the screen gracefully and complete; her other three novels have been adapted anywhere from competently (Mansfield Park) to downright atrociously (I’m looking at you, Emma, no matter how sweet Gwyneth Paltrow is)) and the general sentiment that none of the multifarious tries at Jane Eyre have really gotten it right (I have only seen one other: Franco Zeffirelli’s 1996 version) alludes to the difficulty. Mr. Zeffirelli’s version starts out promisingly: the Lowood years are magnificent, due entirely to Anna Paquin’s fierce turn as young Jane, and Charlotte Gainsbourg, with her ungainly beauty that can be dressed down fits plain Jane well. But a poorly judged third act that truncates Jane’s stay at Moor House spoils any of the promise the previous two thirds of the film obliged.

This new version, directed by Cary Fukunaga, rearranges the chronology, beginning with Jane fleeing from Thornfield, only taking us back to Aunt Reed and Lowood in recuperating memories. Economically handled, these scenes serve their purpose, even if they are a little rushed. Perhaps Mr. Fukunaga knew he had no one to compare to Ms. Paquin, and wisely moved on. Mia Wasikowska, a promising Australian (really, Australia, share some of your thespianic wealth, please. Isn’t it enough that you have Blanchett, Kidman, and Watts already?) who earned a place in my best supporting actress lineup last year for glum-realist teenager in The Kids Are Alright announces herself here as fine company to the best of her fellow countrywomen. Like Ms. Gainsbourg, she, while certainly not plain, transforms well into the physically neutral yet intellectually electrifying woman of Brontë’s creation. Mr. Fassbender is unnaturally handsome, but here again disguises some of that raw beauty with intensely rendered expressions of longing, pain, and resignation. The tension between the two is like electrical particles spiraling in a thunderstorm. Pure, palpable attraction. You can almost taste it in the air. These are flames of desire burning within, held in check. Indeed, much is made of the light in this film, from the airy, otherworldly illumination of daylight to the jittery untrustworthy flicker of fire and candle. It’s an exquisite picture, but beyond that, the light propels the tone of the film, which is where it mirrors Brontë’s story so well. The aforementioned sexual tension combined with the dreamlike suspense drawn from the Gothic setting make for a heightened experience—ethereal, fantastical. Brontë brings up the fantastical repeatedly, and the film follows suit; Jane is called a ghost or unreal on several occasions.

The theme of female independence is handled well, and Rochester is not portrayed too sympathetically. His behavior around the wedding explores this dark disturbing side of him, yet also unveils how Jane is the only person who could ever bear and comprehend it. Rochester’s burning passions are well balanced by Jamie Bell’s St. John, and the final act of the film is excellently rendered, with just as much attention to detail of setting as what came before. For many reasons Jane’s stay at Moor House is most significant of any of her previous sojourns, which is why Zeffirelli’s version imminently fails. Judi Dench provides delight as always as Mrs. Fairfax, and Sally Hawkins works the oh-gawd-I’m-dyin’ routine with a punch of understated authenticity. Handsomely mounted, the film never goes over the top (it could have easily delved into Twilight land), but holds a steady hand on constraint, and even finds humor in some of the culture clashes (“My, that was very, French.”). It surely won’t be the last adaptation of Brontë’s novel, but it will suffice and then some as the adaptation that gets the most right, and as a standalone piece of cinema it outstrips many a romance. If only the Twilight groupies could be convinced that they don’t need fangs for otherworldly romance, they’d find a far superior movie experience waiting for them at the art house.

Catch it while you can and read the book while you’re at it.

Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkings, Holliday Grainger, Tamzin Merchant, Imogen Poots
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:32 pm

http://blog.timesunion.com/movies/starts-tomorrow-jane-eyre/1142/

Starts tomorrow: JANE EYRE
April 7, 2011 at 8:14 pm by Peg Aloi

Mia Wasikowska in JANE EYRE.

This wonderful re-imagining of one of the most well-loved novels in the English language is well worth your time. Adapted by Moira Buffini (TAMARA DREWE) and directed by Cary Fukunaga (SIN NOMBRE), the stellar cast includes Mia Wasikowska (THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT) as Jane, Michael Fassbender (CENTURION) as Rochester, and Dame Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax.

This version spends some time on Jane’s exile from Rochester’s home, spent with the missionary St. John Rivers (THE EAGLE’s Jamie Bell) and his sisters. In fact, the film opens with Jane’s flight from Thornfield Hall, running across the barren moors and allowing nature to enfold her. One thing I love about Fukunaga and Buffini’s version of the story is that it doesn’t hold back from portraying the centrality of the natural world in the lives of this book’s characters: something modern readers may well have a hard time relating to. Jane is a creature of nature, and when the world of men fails her she returns to it for solace. This theme is served well by the stunning photography is stunning, shot in location in the Peak District ofl England. (I discuss this in more detail in this review.)

The acting is simply first-rate. George C. Scott is my favorite Rochester, but Fassbender gives him a run for his money. And Wasikowska’s Jane is subtle and intense, a performance that is astonishing for such a young actress. It was very hard for me to find fault with this film. For Fukunaga, a relatively inexperienced (but obviously very talented) director to tackle this classic is a bold move. He gives the film a gothic sensibility that is often missing from filmed versions of Bronte’s novel, which often focus on the romantic elements of the story. Who says romance isn’t scary sometimes?
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:35 pm

http://blog.wimgo.com/projections/2011/04/06/movie-review-much-filmed-%E2%80%98jane-eyre%E2%80%99-gets-brisk-unconventional-retelling/

Movie review: Much-filmed ‘Jane Eyre’ gets brisk, unconventional retelling
Posted on April 6th, 2011 at 3:24 pm

Any filmgoer looking askance at yet another adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s often-filmed 1847 novel “Jane Eyre” can rest assured that the new one by up-and-coming director Cary Fukunaga is a smart, worthy addition to the book’s burgeoning, multi-media canon.

Since 1910, Bronte’s sprawling, multi-themed, five-stage tome has spawned 18 film versions, at least 10 TV adaptations, a radio drama, a two-act ballet, a stage musical, an opera, a symphonic interpretation, a graphic novel, numerous literary spinoffs, prequels and sequels and more.

So what’s new to glean from this heavily worked literary artifact whose 38 chapters are chockablock with florid motifs and allusions (from romanticism to Gothic horror; from the Byronic hero to the madwoman in the attic) and whose five sections range through hefty matters of morality and religion, social class and gender relations, love and passion, independence and the search for home and family, as well as atonement and forgiveness?

In the fairly flinty but lovely performance by Mia Wasikowska (“Alice in
Wonderland”) as Jane, in the cannily configured script by British playwright Moira Buffini (“Tamara Drewe”) and in the bold, richly visual direction of Fukunaga this film seems surprisingly fresh, more tough-minded and less melodramatic than previous versions.

Fukunaga, a film phenom who earned a Student Oscar at the University of California Santa Cruz and launched his career strongly with the tough immigrant thriller “Sin Nombre,” seems an odd choice to helm this elaborate period piece. But it seems his fresh eyes and contemporary sensibilities serve the material well.

Unlike previous versions (notably the 1944 Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine film and the lush, 1996 Franco Zeffereli picture), this film radically shuffles the story’s chronology and opens with a nifty framing device before condensing Jane’s cruel Victorian childhood into concise flashbacks.

The movie opens with Jane fleeing Thornfield Hall and Rochester’s dire secret into a sodden, storm-swept night on the desolate moors. After a shivering Jane is taken in by the pious clergyman St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell of “Billy Elliot” fame) and his kindly sisters (Holliday Grainger and Tamzin Merchant), we hark back to the chapters that brought her here.

There’re scenes of the spirited young Jane (Amelia Clarkson) being brutally mistreated by her hateful aunt (Sally Hawkins) and priggish cousins. There’s Jane being shipped off to the parochial Lowood charity school where she suffers the brimstone abuses of the zealous headmaster (Simon McBurney) and sees her gentle best friend (Fraya Parks) die of consumption.

There’s a grown Jane who survives the rigors of Lowood, emerges as a beloved teacher and accepts a position at Thornfield Hall as tutor to the young French ward of the brooding Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender, too handsome by half). Judi Dench lends dramatic heft here as the kindly housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax.

The rest of the story unfolds in familiar fashion, with some spooky, well-placed shocks and dire Gothic flourishes and a proper but perhaps too-slow developing respect and ardor growing between Jane, all demure and noble, and Rochester, tortured and temperamental.

But that slow-burning chemistry between Wasikowska and Fassbender does eventually ignite into full-blown passion, and its compelling glow finally manages to assure this stylish and impressive translation of Bronte’s classic a prominent place on movie bookshelves.

- Dennis King

“Jane Eyre”

PG-13
1:55
3 stars
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench
(Some thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content)
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:38 pm

http://www.thecoast.ca/halifax/a-gothic-beautiful-jane-eyre/Content?oid=2409126

A gothic, beautiful Jane Eyre
Newest adaptation of Brontë novel soars
by Molly Segal
Cary Joji Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre is a riveting adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë novel. Jane (Mia Wasikowska), a strong-willed governess, falls in love with her boss---the lecherous-turned-lovable Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender)---who owns the haunted Thornfield Manor. Fukunaga tastefully alters the book’s plot and reconstructs the story in a suspenseful, non-linear fashion, using flashbacks to summarize key details from Jane’s traumatic childhood. A palette of muted colours, moody grey skies, and candlelit interiors envelop you in Jane’s bleak world---the sun only shines during the film’s tearful finale. Moira Buffini’s screenplay is more heartbreak than humour---though, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench), the manor’s housekeeper, delivers a few well-timed witticisms. Gothic landscapes and an impeccable cast make it a must-see period piece.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:47 am

http://js-show.com/2011/04/doings/

Today, instead of plowing through any of that research, I hung a door between the kitchen and Scott’s office and went to see Jane Eyre. (Which was really beautiful. Especially if you can get on board with strong women who still love assy men. And I can. Especially if the men look like Michael Fassbender.)
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:48 am

http://seriousmovielover.com/2011/04/09/everybody-loves-an-older-man/

Loves an Older Man
By Anne / Saturday, April 9, 2011

JANE ERYE (2011/In Theaters) It had been years since I’d read Jane Eyre or seen the classic 1943 version staring Orson Welles, but I was, as always, moved by the dramatic, dark, and implausible tale of love beyond social class in the mid-nineteenth century England. This newest film version, directed by Cary Fukunaga, takes a big jump from his tale of U.S. bound immigrants and Mexican gangs in Sin Nombre.

The film opens with Jane’s epic hiatus taken from Thornfield Hall which takes place towards the end of the novel, and works its way back to glimpses of an appalling childhood full of abusive family members and authority figures both at home and in a child correctional facility. Fukunaga strikes a perfect balance between staying true to Bronte’s plot and heightening drama for a larger audience by focusing most of the screen time on the growing relationship between Jane and our most beloved Rochester. Both Mia Wasikowska’s and Michael Fassbender’s acting is spot-on. The intriguing “soul-deep” connection developed with little dialogue, and the uncomfortable power dynamic between the two is palpable on screen. Rochester appears to be twice the size and age of Jane, which causes a sort of pedophile-like desire; very true to the book.
Brontë’s works are Gothic in nature, and Fukunaga does a wonderful job portraying this through appropriate lighting and sets. The thick-walled and candle-lit stone buildings in remote and often dreary settings set the perfect mood for both tedium and suspense. I found myself on the edge of my chair due to noises from the inner room and Rochester’s mysterious nature.

While this may not be the perfect movie for a sunny spring day, I highly recommend taking advantage of any remaining winter-like afternoons or evenings to catch film.

Grade: A
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:49 am

http://maryslist.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Saturday, April 9, 2011
Jane Eyre
According to Wikipedia, there have been 15 movie versions of Jane Eyre before the latest take on this classic Charlotte Bronte novel. There really didn't seem to be a need for another version but this addition with Mia Wasikowska as Jane and Michael Fassbender as Rochester manages to make this well known tale fresh. I love Mia Wasikowska (she was especially brilliant as Sophie, the tormented teenager in In Treatment)and she makes a great Jane, waifish with a direct and intense gaze. Fassbender as Rochester is good too, even funny in parts although a little too handsome for the part. This Jane Eyre seems scary and suspensful too -- there are moments when you start -- I even let out a gasp at one point. And, my least favorite part of the novel, when Jane is at Lowood School is happily short. So the 16th Jane Eyre is a worthy addition.
Posted by Mary's List at 8:58 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:58 pm

http://millenniallemons.com/2011/04/10/movie-review-jane-eyre/

Movie review: Jane Eyre

Posted by Catherine on April 10, 2011

This weekend, I happily went to see Jane Eyre with one of my favorite people. Before I talk about the movie, let me say that it was my first time going to the E Street Cinema, and I am obsessed with it. I think I actually dreamed about it last night. The marquee is eye catching, the snacks are glorious (cookies, trail mix, wasabi peas), they serve Peet’s Coffee, and actually have free ice water. The entire place is decorated in huge, old movie posters, with tables and chairs scattered about for lounging.

My Night in Neon - E St. Cinema

Anyway – Jane Eyre. Disclaimer: I have never read the book and do not plan to anytime soon. I have many other things that I care about reading more right now. But I loved (I mean L-O-V-E-D) this movie. It grabs your attention immediately with the first shot and doesn’t release you one bit until you’re 4 minutes into the credits. The movie opens with Jane on the run across a seemingly endless expanse of moors, landing helpless and under an alias at the home of a church man. This movie makes use of many flashbacks, but instead of killing the forward motion of the plot, they maintain the suspense that the filmmakers have so carefully set up. The score by Dario Marianelli is barely noticable in how well it fits the setting and the action and helps to make the story of Jane’s new gig as a governess for the mysterious, cranky Mr Rochester more interesting than it should be. Although there are several shots of Jane peering out windows and watching the wind blow, there are bits of the movie that feel more like a gothic horror movie than any kind of romance. There were actually quite a few startled gasps through the theater at several points during the movie.

Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender were perfect in their roles of Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester and had a quiet but strong chemistry. It doesn’t hurt that Judi Dench also turns up and is wonderful as always.

This movie is sweet, horrifying, bleak, and charming all at the same time. You should go see it now, although I believe it’s better seen on a cloudy, drizzly day.

Top image from here; Bottom image from here.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:58 pm

http://nowshowing321.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Sunday, April 10, 2011
Jane Eyre

Directed by Cary Fukunga
Written by Charlotte Bronte and Moira Buffina
With Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins and Jamie Bell

From the very start of the latest film version of Charlotte Bronte’s 1847 “Jane Eyre,” you almost physically feel the foreboding misty moors of the Derbyshire Hills. This is a Jane Eyre unlike any other, and there have been as been many as 30 earlier film versions.
Director Cary Fukunga and screenwriter Moira Buffina have fooled with the chronology of the novel, and their Jane Eyre begins in the middle. The past is seen as flashbacks. Purists might not appreciate this conceit but it works perfectly well in this “Jane.”
Jane (Mia Wasikowska) is a plain and polite orphan who has lived a life of deprivation and loss. After her parents’ deaths she is sent to live with her wealthy but cold-blooded aunt, Miss Reed (Sally Hawkins). Miss Reed wants only to get Jane out of her sight. So off she is sent to the sadistic Lowood School for Girls where corporal punishment is the norm. Of course, Jane is treated cruelly and unfairly, but she does learn to be a teacher.
Finally a bit of luck comes Jane’s way. She is hired to be the governess for the French-speaking daughter of the wealthy Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender).
Her residence is now a massive and elegantly furnished medieval estate of countless rooms. The housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench), keeps everything in order. She is a kindly sort, always rushing here and there. Jane is treated well in her new situation and her darling charge is very attached to her.
After awhile the stylish, surly, and somewhat spooky, Mr. Rochester comes home for one of his infrequent visits. The house has been elegantly decked out for opulent soirees to entertain a group of his moneyed houseguest friends. But he has eyes only for the plain, forthright and reserved Jane. However, he has some skeletons in his closet. ou probably know the rest if you have read the novel; If you haven’t then, the film will inform you.
Jane Eyre is about as atmospheric as a film can get. Cinematographer Adriano Goldman gives you a strong sense of place throughout. Gorgeous scenes of Derbyshire’s moors are usually shrouded in fog. It seems to be cold and rainy much of the time. It is an unforgiving land, bleak but beautiful.
Cary Fukunga has been able to capture the spookiness of the story without dwelling on it. There are strange sounds emanating from who knows what; there are loud poundings on doors; the mists conceal approaching figures. But the focus is kept on Jane’s quiet strength, her innocence, her perceptiveness. She is ‘character’ personified..
Aussie Mia Wasikowski demonstrates Jane’s depth with few words. She glows in this role of a woman who has to hide her inner life. At times you feel like you are inside her head. She very quietly bristles with courage.
Michael Fassbender as the handsome rogue, Mr. Rochester, has just the right amount of creepiness combined with an almost carnal sexiness. His passion is not far from the surface. Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax, the goodhearted but crotchety housekeeper, adds the right amount of humor to this splendid film.
This thoughtful and elegant “Jane Eyre” offers superb performances, glorious cinematography, and a very compelling story—there is a reason there have been so many remakes of it. And you see that no matter how plain and lacking in funds a woman may be, she can get a guy: and a wealthy, handsome one at that!
Posted by Susan Forbes at 12:32 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:59 pm

http://moviereviewsbythecweave.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre-in-theaters.html

Sunday, April 10, 2011
"Jane Eyre" - in theaters
I was intending on seeing "Suckerpunch" this weekend, but it was a pleasant surprise to find that "Jane Eyre" was playing nearby. My friend was game, so we made the short trip up the theatre that tends to play the more independent movie set.

That being said, it was a good choice.

"Jane Eyre" is the story of Jane (Mia Wasikowska), an orphan raised partially by her aunt (Sally Hawkins), who then expels her from the house to a hard school for girls. She is there until she receives her first posting, at an estate called Thornfield. Thornfield is in the middle of nowhere, her boss, Mr. Rochester (the delicious Michael Fassbender), is largely unaccounted for, her pupil is French, and the housekeeper (Judi Dench) is a busybody who is desperate for companionship. Clearly the dream situation for a young girl in 1800's England.

But Jane doesn't mind. She enjoys her work and the quiet it brings. She's very passionate about life, learning, and experience, which is part of the reason why she was expelled from her aunt's house. But this passion shines through during her infrequent conversations with Mr. Rochester. I think that what he sees the most in her is potential. More to the point, he sees that he could be happy with her in a way that he was never happy before. And it's these sweet moments when you can see him beginning to believe that, that really make the movie.

But of course, things are not all that they seem. I won't go into it, but just know that Jamie Bell (love him!) makes an appearance and helps Jane out in a time of need. If I told you what happened, that might ruin the story, and we don't want that, do we?

The story has a spooky angle, which I wasn't expecting. I haven't read the book since high school, and so had to be reminded of a few key plot points, but the filmmaker does a fine job of making Thornfield both inviting and menacing at the same time. You can tell that Jane never feels 100% safe some of the time, and neither does the audience. Plus, I'm pretty sure I jumped more during this movie than I did during "The Sixth Sense", hard as that is to believe.

Mia Wasikowska does a great job as Jane. It's hard to make her appear "plain, at least physically. Once you see her personality shine through, there is nothing plain about her. Michael Fassbender, whose voice could literally make my underwear melt off, is fantastic as Rochester. He's a hard ass one minute, then sweet as a kitten the next. And the way he looks at Jane just makes me wish that a man would look at me that way, you know what I'm saying?

So on the CWeave scale, I rate this movie a 9. Great performances and a great storyline. This is one I will own, and probably watch a million times. And I suggest that you all do the same.
Posted by The CWeave at 12:23 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:59 pm

http://danceanthak.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Sunday, April 10, 2011
Jane Eyre
I saw the new Jane Eyre last night and it was impossibly wonderful. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender were perfect for their parts. They are both beautiful people in unusal ways which makes their chemisty work so well on film. I have been obsessed with Michael Fassbender since he was in Inglourious Basterds and I got hooked on In Treatment where Mia Wasikowska was a powerhouse. The story of Jane Eyre is probably my favorite in that British romantic genre. Just like Lizzy in Pride and Predjudice, Jane Eyre is a strong female character placed in a time where that sort of thing was unusal. What makes Jane Eyre higher on the scale then stories like Pride and Prejudice is the love that comes out of tragedy. I am a hopeless romantic when it comes to forbidden love. Sure the same classism issues are present in Pride and Prejudice but there's just something more real and devestating about Jane Eyre that really gets to me. Probably because the tragedy goes past class issues. I would like Wuthering Hights more if I wasn't so annoyed by Cathy but their story is so tragic and I love it! I don't know why the tragic romances are my favorite. The English Patient is probably my favorite movie in that sort of vein. So beautiful...so sad. I actually downloaded the BBC miniseries version of Pride and Prejuidice today to start watching...I'm just in that sort of romantic mood I suppose Smile If you can find a showing of Jane Eyre and if you like that sort of story go see it!! You will not be disappointed. Swoon.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:00 pm

http://appleandorion.com/2011/04/10/jane-eyre-orions-take/

Jane Eyre–Orion’s Take
April 10, 2011 wafflemovies

Full disclosure: I hated Jane Eyre when I read it in high school. It was the ending that frustrated me: a happy ending to a story wreathed in darkness and fear. I found it utterly unbelievable, so much so that I ended up rewriting the ending for my final project (I got an A-). My ending was depressing, but in my rather biased estimation, more realistic.

The film has all of the novel’s weaknesses, but beautifully renders its strengths on the screen. The first shot, darkness opening unto light, brought me back so viscerally into a story I had forgotten that I literally caught my breath. As the story of a cruel childhood unfolded and I remembered what I had read several years ago, I marveled at how much I had despised the novel. I was attracted to Jane Eyre’s quiet fire, the spunk and emotion of her youth, and the dignified sarcasm of her adulthood. I felt myself hoping for her happiness, for love to bloom and grace her face with a smile. To tell the truth, I was surprised at how sentimental I was being, which speaks to both the strength of the plot as penned by Charlotte Bronte and the strength of the acting. Amelia Clarkson is great as a young Jane Eyre, her strength dancing undaunted in her eyes when she declares to her stepmother that she is not a liar. Mia Wasikowska, a very young Australian actress (just 21!) is a marvel, stiff and reserved when necessary, but exploding into a sarcastic biting wit when bantering. Judie Dench, a legend, brings strength and dignity to the character of Mrs. Fairfax (where, to be fair, strength probably was hard to find). Michael Fassbender is excellent as the rather grumpy Mr. Rochester. I can gush on and on about the cast, but I think you get the point.

One of many great aspects of this film is the way in which it conveys not only the central romance of the book but also the gothic, creepiness of the story. Mr. Rochester doesn’t just brood because he’s a brooding person. There is a darkness behind him that is wonderfully captured. Jane Eyre’s own troubled past is explored in full detail. And this is all done absolutely beautifully: the film looks gorgeous. The lush greens of a rich countryside, the darkness that existed before the invention of electric lights, the gleam of rich wood, the bleakness of stone is all captured and expressed in a way that is hard for novels.

But, and there must be a but, the ending is still unsatisfying for your brain. However, I accepted it in my heart. This is a true adaptation, one that captures the soul of the novel in a way that I admire. The ending, as bad as it remains, was one that I appreciated. I needed a happy ending and hopefully so will you.

4.5/5 Waffles

–Orion
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:00 pm

http://www.the-back-row.com/index.php/2011/04/10/sunday-short-reviews-35

Jane Eyre (2011)
Cary Fukunaga's retelling of the classic Bronte story has gorgeous production design, beautiful sets, wonderful locations, excellent costumes and props...but is ultimately empty. I felt no connection to any of the characters, nor did the characters seem to feel any connection to each other. When Michael Fassbender's Rochester proposes to Jane, it took me completely by surprise because there just seemed to be so little chemistry between him and Mia Wasikowska. The film has no tension to speak of, romantic or otherwise, and as a result it comes off as a bit of a snooze-fest. There's a scene where Jane discovers Rochester's room is on fire as he sleeps, which should have at least had some kind of dramatic weight, but the fire is put out so easily that when Rochester says Jane saved his life, I had trouble believing that he meant it. Jane Eyre is a delight on a visual level, but if you try to find anything beneath the surface, you will be disappointed. Also, the marketing campaign for this movie was totally misleading.

3 out of 5
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:20 pm

http://sarahtwilley.posterous.com/more-than-five-favorites

3. Jane Eyre
Saw Jane Eyre last week. Oh my goodness, I loved it! Mia Wasikowska was brilliant in the title role, Michael Fassbender (omg, love him!) actually made me swoon whilst remaining dark and mysterious as Rochester. And I almost didn't recognize Jamie Bell (the sweet little dancing Billy Elliot) as St. John Rivers. The movie is only in limited release (seriously, VERY limited release), so many won't ever get to see it in the theaters, but keep an ear open for a dvd release because it is worth seeing!
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:41 pm

http://thethinredblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/at-art-house-jane-eyre.html

Sunday, April 10, 2011
At the Art House: Jane Eyre
Is yet another period drama remake of Jane Eyre worth your time? Of course it is. The book may remain a Victorian classic and plenty of miniseries may capture the grand scale of the source material better, but Cary Fukunaga crafts a compelling and distinctly modern re-telling of the novel. The film is also helmed by two soon-to-be major Hollywood stars Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, who make the roles wholly their own and command the film with hypnotizing encounters. The film is truly to date, the best of the year.

The film follows Jane (Wasikowska) from her childhood in an abusive family and later a harrowing school, all the while retaining her fiery and quick-witted personality. She soon becomes a governess herself once she reaches adulthood, and is employed by the mysterious Mr. Rochester (Fassbender) to teach his young French girl. The movie really steams up as the passion between the two increase, but when a dark secret is revealed, the bliss is shaken forever, and Jane must make a choice that will alter her life forever.

The film is truly Wasikowska's. She becomes Jane Eyre, and wears less than flattering dresses and hairstyles to seem more mousy than she actually is. It is a very brave performance, and the best of her career undoubtedly. In a time where polite appearances meant everything the seething anger and romantic passion are achingly concealed masterfully by Wasikowska. It is a transformative turn and puts her in line to become a new respected star in the lines of Cate Blanchett or Kate Winslet.

The other anchor of the film is Michael Fassbender in a commanding performance that will only solidify his reputation as one of the great young actors working today. His Rochester is moody, confident, cruel, loving, humorous, and cunning all at once. He is a true wild card putting the characters and audience on edge whenever he is on screen. The pairing with him and Wasikowska may seem odd on paper, but in the film they are dynamite. Their chemistry threatens to catch the screen on fire at times, and their relationship is only more complex because of Fassbender's seemingly schizophrenic nature.

The other members of the cast are well-suited for their roles. Judi Dench provides a somewhat uncharacteristic performance as a house-servant and is marvelous, as is Jamie Bell who plays a caring priest smitten by Jane. Sally Hawkins is also exceptionally villainous as the vain and uncaring guardian of Jane, Mrs. Reed. It may be a film for two stars, but the other players are important and do justice to their parts.

There is so much else to praise where to begin? Technically, the film is flawless. The lighting and intimate quarters of the large castle are exquisitely well-rendered by Fukunaga. At night, the movie is magical as the candles provide such realistically unhelpful light to the pitch-black and spooky castle. During the day, the sun is sparse and the melancholy fog and cloud-cover add to the gothic feel of the film, as if you have to look over your shoulder to know you are safe. Fukunaga also uses a surprising amount of handheld when filming the intimate scenes of Jane and Rochester, giving an immediate and modern air to it. It actually works remarkably well, as Fukunaga seems to have a symbiosis with the period drama and the emotional heights he wishes to capture, and he does so admirably.

That brings us to the screenplay. Writer Moira Buffini crafts an Oscar worthy script using the beautiful, romantic dialogue of the source material and mixing it with a post-modern retelling using many flashbacks and subjective storytelling. Right when you think you have the film figured out it turns in a new direction catching you off guard and forcing you to pay close attention. The romance between Jane and Rochester is also a wonder to behold. There is a passionate yet smoldering romance behind these stiff upper-lipped Brits, and more suspense is generated in these sequences of nuanced, tender, and raw romance than in any action film. With beautiful dialogue like Rochester telling Jane "You transfix me quite" and giving a long and heartfelt speech about how their hearts are connected by string you can't help but swoon for both lovers. This still comes back to Wasikowska and Fassbender who give everything they've got emotionally and psychologically to these characters.

The music by the always reliable Dario Marianelli is also beautiful. The mix of shrill and dangerous strings heightens the edgy tone the film strives for. Fukunaga knows his limits in how modernist he can get for a classic period drama, and he employs Marianelli to keep the film firmly rooted in its Victorian setting. The sets and costumes are also richly detailed, and it is surprising to see an independent production like this capture the time so effectively with these while never alienating the audience. A masterful job to be sure.

Still, this film is about the literally burning romance between Jane and Rochester. Jane's unwavering independence and the guardedly dangerous undercurrent of Rochester make their romance unobtainable and tightly veiled but apparent all the same. Here is where the film goes the step that many period pieces don't go. Many are to concerned with historical accuracy to truly let the characters drive the story, but here it is the complete opposite. When Wasikowska and Fassbender finally confess their love to each other it is a moment we have been anxiously awaiting and you cheer as they cast off their polite, stiff facades and give in to their desire for each other. It might not go down in history like the epic period pieces such as Visconti's "The Leopard", Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon" or Polanski's "Tess", but it doesn't strive for this. Yes, there is a three hour epic somewhere in "Jane Eyre", but the focus on the raw and heart-wrenching romance replaces this easily. And with an ending that will stay with you and keep you in your seat tearing up, it'd hard not to call it the best film of the year so far.

Overall: Bracingly passionate performances by Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, attentive direction, and a beautiful yet edgy screenplay, make this adaptation of "Jane Eyre" absolutely stellar. A
Posted by Will Quade at 5:58 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:42 pm

http://kalafudra.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/jane-eyre-charlotte-bronte/

Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë)
Friday, 8. April 2011

Jane Eyre is Charlotte Brontë‘s most famous novel.

Plot:
Jane Eyre is an orphan, growing up with her aunt Mrs Reed, who treats her rather badly. When Jane shows signs of rebellion against this treatment when she’s ten, she is sent to boarding school. 8 years later she leaves there to take up a position as a governess at Thornfield Hall, which belongs to Mr. Rochester. Jane and Rochester quickly connect with each other – but there is a secret in Thornfield Hall.

I thought I’d pretty much hate everything about Jane Eyre, especially Rochester. Fact is, I did not hate anything about it, really (apart from the constant piety, but it shall be forgiven in the historical cotntext). But I was really, really bored by it all.

I don’t know where I picked up the idea that I would hate Jane Eyre and that Rochester would be an abusive ass. But I’m glad to say that I was wrong about it. When I started reading, I thought that I was right after all: the little Jane is so meek and she’s pretty much a doormat. Thankfully that changes with Chapter 3 or so and Jane develops into a very good heroine.

She still isn’t my favorite person – she’s too obsessed with (Christian) morality for my taste and her doormattiness comes and goes with too much irregularity – but she is a great, flawed, strong character, even if I don’t like her personally.

Rochester as well proved to not be abusive as I thought he was. He’s moody. And he’s a bit of an ass and, again, for me personally, he’s no kind of attractive person (though it did help to picture him as Michael Fassbender who is like, insanely hot and manages to make me overlook personality shortcomings for a while). But at least he has a good reason to
Spoiler:
lock his wife up in the attic. Though trying to marry Jane anyway is a real asshole move.

St. John on the other hand really is a dick.

But apart from the characters that where good even though I didn’t like them, the story mostly bored me. Brontë’s prose is too flowery for my taste and I just wished that everything was a little more concise. There’s just not enough that happens to justify the novel’s length.

Summarising: Maybe you like it better. But it really wasn’t my thing.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:42 pm

http://myyearofmovies.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre-2011.html

Thursday, April 07, 2011
Jane Eyre (2011)
I actually went out like a regular person this week and saw a real live movie....like at a theater! I had to drive an hour and 40 minutes to get there, since it was only playing in two theaters in Michigan and both of them well over 90 miles away...but I did it. I am so happy I bothered. Jane Eyre is definitely my favorite book. I think I read it the first time in 9th grade, and I have read it almost every single year at least once. I have never grown tired of it. However, in movie form...I have seldom been satisfied. I saw the Orson Welles Version several years ago, so I can't really remember what my issues were with that one. I do know that I absolutely hated the 1996 version with William Hurt, who in my opinion was the worst Mr. Rochester of all time. This version wasn't perfect. There is always either too much of something and not enough of others for me. This time it was lacking in the early years, both before and after Lowood School those were some of my favorite parts in the book and I always yearn for more in the film versions. This was by far, my favorite Jane (played by the incredibly talented Mia Wasikowska) and Mr. Rochester (played by the finally interesting enough...Michael Fassbender) so there was no issues there. I was very pleasantly suprised, and am sure that I will be seeing this again if it comes to a theater a little closer to me. Its about time someone got a great classic novel right on screen! See if if you get a chance, I don't think you will be sorry.
Jane Eyre (2011)
Posted by Shel at 5:20 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 1:41 am

http://www.ebar.com/arts/art_article.php?sec=film&article=869

My Jane Eyre
Film
Published 04/14/2011

by David Lamble

Somebody who claims wisdom over such matters asserts there have been 18 versions of Jane Eyre filmed since film was invented. I shall not count them myself because #18 – the transcendently romantic, tragic, gothic ghost story directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, with the captivating quartet of Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell and Dame Judi Dench – will forever be my Jane Eyre.

How many queer folks on the darkest night of some impossible passion for some impossibly splendid beloved have not wished that we could be as nakedly honest, bold and heartbreaking articulate as the much-abused young heroine created by Charlotte Bronte? Romantic speeches for women don't get any better than the declaration of love and independence delivered by Jane (Wasikowska), no longer meek, mild or compliant, to her once-master but not-necessarily future husband Mr. Rochester (Fassbender).

"Am I a machine without feelings? Do you think because I am poor, obscure, plain and little that I am soulless and heartless? I have as much soul as you, and fully as much heart. And if God had blessed me with beauty and wealth, I could have made it as hard for you to leave me as it is for I to leave you. I am not speaking to you through mortal flesh. It is my spirit that addresses your spirit as if we passed through the grave and stood at God's feet, equal as we are."

For those who haven't brushed up on their Bronte, the story commences with the young Jane being cruelly bullied by her evil cousin, mistreated and consigned to a hell-and-brimstone boarding school by a coldhearted aunt, where (queer crib notes) she forms an affection for another girl who dies next to her in an unheated dorm room.

The adult Jane gets a stab at good fortune when she's hired to be the governess to a young French girl, the ward of the mysterious and frequently absent lord of the manor, Mr. Rochester. Late one night on an errand into town, she accidentally spooks her master's horse, causing a painful if not entirely cute meet. In subsequent days and nights, Rochester and Jane develop an intellectual intimacy wholly untypical of this rigid, classbound society.

Screenwriter Moira Buffini and director Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) dole out tiny snippets of Jane's life in a possibly haunted castle, including the night a wounded, ravishingly beautiful young nobleman is brought in for emergency medical treatment, and the fateful night when Jane saves Rochester from a fire enveloping his bedroom.

Jane's path to the altar is cruelly interrupted by circumstances in Rochester's past, and soon the poor young woman is wandering in a daze upon the moors, where she is discovered by a young preacher (Jamie Bell) and his sisters. Jane's good fortune continues with an unexpected inheritance that prompts the young preacher to propose the kind of cold marriage that Jane has secretly feared might be her fate.

To reject the likes of Jamie Bell simply because of emotional incompatibility is a big moment, but not a facile one. We may question Jane's judgment in the man department (what's wrong with a god-obsessed creature when he's Jamie Bell?), but respect her character and pull for her long odds with that Rochester guy.

In some peculiar way, the modern queer temperament contains more than a dollop of the Bronte sisters' utopian love of equals. This Jane Eyre may have taken over a century and half to reach us, but don't let laziness keep you away from sharing this sister's journey to overcome the limits of the flesh, and luxuriate in the imperfect but beautiful love of kindred souls.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 1:41 am

http://www.theramonline.com/culture/ram-review-jane-eyre-2011-1.2541649

Ram Review: Jane Eyre (2011)

By LAUREN HATHAWAY

STAFF WRITER

Published: Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Updated: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 17:04

When the first shot of the latest film adaptation of Jane Eyre appeared on the huge theater screen in front of me, I thought I had died and gone to English major heaven.

Despite my excitement for this new take on the novel, one that had been touted in the trailers to have "a bold new vision," I had my doubts. How could this film be that different from the dozens of adaptations that already existed? Moreover, how could one of the greatest literary works of the Victorian era possibly be crammed into a mere two hour-long movie?

From the film's beginning, director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) makes it unapologetically clear that this will not be a cut-and-paste version of the novel to film. The film opens with an adult Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska, Alice in Wonderland) escaping from her room in Thornfield Hall and running through the barren moors, seemingly with no end in sight. Appearing to be on the brink of death, she is taken in and nursed to health by St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell, Defiance), a young yet austere clergyman, and his two sisters.

Through flashbacks, we learn about Jane's past, beginning from when she is a child, an orphan despised and abused by her aunt and cousins with whom she lives. Cast out by her family, Jane is sent to a charity school for girls where she is still oppressed and treated unfairly. However, she finds a true friend, who soon dies of illness.

Despite the many hardships Jane endures as a child, she grows into an intelligent and well educated, albeit "plain and little," young woman and eventually finds herself a position as a governess at Thornfield Hall, the estate of Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender, 300). Although Mr. Rochester's manners are harsh, he and Jane strike up a friendship, one that is based on intellectual equality and mutual respect. If it wasn't already clear after witnessing some smoldering glances between the two, it quickly becomes apparent that the master of the house and the sharp-tongued governess have more on their minds than conversation. Jane's happy life at Thornfield Hall is short-lived, however, as dark secrets are revealed and she is faced with moral dilemmas.

In typical gothic fashion, Jane Eyre is not simply a love story but also a dark thriller, full of mystery and secrets. The cinematography of the film reflects this beautifully. The colors and lighting seem to shift between dark and gloomy and vivid and bright, according to the atmosphere and emotions entangled within the plot at each moment.

In fact, the visuals of Jane Eyre are perhaps the strongest aspect of the film. If the gorgeous setting doesn't draw you in, Fukunaga's impeccable attention to historical detail will. Jane Eyre is perfectly plain in her pulled back hair and dull gray dress, contrasting sharply with her upper class rival, Blanche Ingram's, fancy appearance. In addition, the interior of Thornfield Hall is just right as a sort of keeper of secrets, appearing both beautiful and eerie in its grandeur.

Another pleasant surprise is that the film feels neither too fast-paced nor lacking in plot despite its time constraints. Although certain characters and plot points are altered, shortened or completely ignored in the film, the story still flows seamlessly, a feat in itself when considering Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre is a lengthy, three-part novel.

Another positive aspect of the film is that the characters actually act their age. Many directors in the past have ignored the large age difference between Jane and Rochester. However, Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender physically fit their roles perfectly, and embody their characters' personalities and emotions.

The only downside to the film – and a major downside it is – is that there is a lack of passion between the characters of Jane and Mr. Rochester. There are certain moments in the film that were absolutely breathtaking between the two, especially when they share an almost-kiss moment in the middle of the night after Jane has saved Rochester's life. Yet at other pivotal points of the film, the chemistry is lacking. Perhaps the passion would develop more strongly were the film slightly longer and if we were able to see more interaction between the two characters. However, even though some critics have blasted this adaptation for that particular reason, I don't think the lack of passion is so strong that it ruins the film.

All in all, this is a wonderful adaptation of Jane Eyre, and my personal favorite of all versions I have seen. Whether or not you've read the novel (and everyone should at some point in their lives), this film is worth a trip to the movie theater.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:37 am

http://suchmovingpictures.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre-review.html

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Jane Eyre Review

Cary Fukunaga follows up his marvelous immigration tale Sin Nombre with a new retelling of a literary classic, Charlotte Bronte's eerie and strangely romantic Jane Eyre. The trailers promised a faithful adaptation, spurring many unfamiliar with the book to ask me, "Is it really like that?" Indeed, Bronte's masterpiece is laced with subtly supernatural stirrings, creating a mystery around the central characters and complicating Jane's seemingly impossible romance with Rochester. Fukunaga has brought the tale to the screen with the most crucial elements intact, not limited to such concrete elements as characters and settings. This Jane Eyre perfectly channels the tone of its source material, at once providing the viewer with a careful Victorian romance not unlike Jane Austen and the sort of otherworldly mystery that could suck shallow Twihards into something much more worth their while.

The film restructures the novel into a frame narrative, with much of Jane's life told as a flashback to St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his sisters. The structure serves the narrative well, providing a sense of dread to Jane's (Mia Wasikowska) initial relationship with Rochester (Michael Fassbender), as the audience is keenly aware that, at some point, Jane flees. The result is a narrative glossed both by the audience's inevitable desire to see Jane and Rochester paired and the knowledge that such a pairing may not happen (at least initially). Thus, more than 500 pages of novel gain a sense of momentum and destination that prevents viewers from getting antsy as they wait for plot development. It's a brilliant move.

The restructuring also allows Wasikowska to dominate the film from the first, as her childhood is presented through her eyes. Wasikowska plays the part brilliantly, imbuing Jane with the propriety and quiet strength that make her such a fascinating heroine. In fact, it seems odd to say Wasikowska dominates, as she shows such restraint and subtlety that her power never reveals itself all at once. While her Jane seems (to me at least) a perfect translation of Bronte's character, Wasikowska also adds her unique touch to the character, lending her the occasional softness and romanticism that complement the sometimes impenetrable exterior and create a more fully rounded protagonist.

Fassbender makes a stunning Rochester, intimidating, dark, and magnetic despite his moodiness. Fassbender makes the enigmatic master something like the Beast - even when he's not onscreen, his presence is felt, especially in the scenes at Thornfield. He looms over the film like a shadow, and the relentless darkness of his character complicates the romance viewers are programmed to desire, perhaps even more so than Rochester's shady past itself.

Fassbender and Wasikowska have indelible chemistry, whether matching wits in the sort of intellectual contests Rochester so revels in or finally succumbing to their shared desire. Rochester and Jane are characters who, by many rights, should not be together, but thankfully, Fukunaga presents the relationship with much the same delicacy and complexity Bronte does, creating a couple that is appealing despite its seeming inadequacies.

In addition to the strength of the central romance, the film is simply gorgeous to behold. The set decoration and costumes are beautiful and immerse the viewer in the world while also underlining the characters' statuses. Jane's plain garb marks her as socially unworthy of Rochester in his fine suits and surrounded by ladies in much fancier dress. It's all wonderfully captured and musically accompanied, as well, with yearning strings dominating Dario Marianelli's stirring score.

While many decry the lack of originality in Hollywood today, Fukunaga has proven that what ultimately matters is the strength of the film itself. Even a story as well-known and often-told as Jane Eyre can feel new and exciting again in such talented hands.
Posted by Clayton W. at 7:43 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:38 am

http://filmdrift.com/2011/04/13/seven-mini-reviews-from-poetry-to-jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska in "Jane Eyre"

“Jane Eyre” is a beautiful love story directed by Cary Fukunaga; the movie’s screenplay was written by Moira Buffini based on the classic English novel by Charlotte Bronte. I’ve never read the book Jane Eyre, nor have I seen another movie version of it, which means that my impression of the story is based solely on seeing the film. I will say though, that I enjoyed the similarities between “Jane Eyre” and the classic 1939 film “Wuthering Heights.” This is no coincidence, since the novel Wuthering Heights was written by Charlotte’s sister, Emily. The movie’s main character, Jane Eyre, had a rough childhood. She eventually goes out on her own into the world and ends up as a governess at the home of a brooding Mr. Rochester. At first Rochester is cold to Jane, but they become friends. Then they begin to fall in love. Tragically, Mr. Rochester has a secret which may keep the pair from ever marrying. The film stars Mia Wasikowska (“The Kids Are All Right,” “Alice In Wonderland”) as Jane and Michael Fassbender (“Inglourious Basterds,” “300″) as Rochester. Dame Judi Dench portrays Mrs. Fairfax, and Jamie Bell (“Billy Elliot,” “The Eagle”) is St. John Rivers. “Jane Eyre” is beautifully executed. The acting is excellent, as are the dialogue and direction. The film is almost like a Merchant and Ivory production.
Rating 3 our of 4 stars
2011, Rated PG-13, 120 minutes, Drama, Romance
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