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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 5

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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:43 am

http://gothic-clothing.info/gothic-fashion-ram-review-jane-eyre-2011/

Gothic Fashion | Ram Review: Jane Eyre (2011)
Thursday, April 14th, 2011

When the first shot of the latest film version of Jane Eyre appeared on the big screen for me, I thought I died and went to the big sky English.

Despite my enthusiasm for this new vision of the novel, one that had advertised in the trailers was "an ambitious project:" I had my doubts. How could this film is that, in contrast to the dozens of adaptations that already exists? Besides, how could one of the greatest literary works of the Victorian era can be crammed into a small two-hour movie?

Beginning of the film, the director makes Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) makes clear that there is a version of cut-and-shame-and-paste of the novel to film. The film begins with an adult, Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska, Alice in Wonderland) escaped from her room at Thornfield Hall and runs through the dry heath, with no apparent end in sight. It seems to be on the verge of death, it is argued, the health of St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell, Defiance), but a sober young preacher, and his two sisters.

Through flashbacks we learn of Jane's past, from the moment they have a child, an orphan, despised and mistreated by her aunt and cousins, with whom he lives. Disowned by her family, Jane was at a charity school for girls, where they still oppressed and treated unjustly. However, she finds a faithful friend, who dies early in the disease.

Despite the many difficulties take Jane as a child grows into an intelligent and educated, though small and simple young woman and eventually it was a job as governess at Thornfield Hall, the estate of Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender, 300 ). coarsely While Mr. Rochester, Jane, and he strikes a friendship, one based on spiritual equality and mutual respect. If it were not already clear, after seeing a series of smoldering glances between the two, it is clear that the Lord home and the sharp-tongued housekeeper to live more in the mind of a conversation. happy life of Jane to Thornfield Hall to be short-lived, but reveals a dark secret, and she is faced with moral dilemmas.

Typically, Gothic, Jane Eyre is not just a love story, but also a dark thriller, full of secrets and mysteries. The photograph of the film reflects this beauty. The colors seem dark and the lights change to capture the dark and vivid and sharp, depending on the mood and feeling in the conspiracy at any time.
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:46 am

http://ladymoviephile.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Jane Eyre
Ahhh, The Senator...this was the only theatre playing Jane Eyre in the Baltimore area. This theatre is not to its former splendor, but this movie was glorious! I was more familiar with the history of the Bronte than I was the story of Jane Eyre. The tragedy of the fictional characters' stories was as much as the writer's. Jane Eyre, played by Mia Wasikowska, was an orphan from a wealthy family who was then sent away to school by her scornful aunt. Sally Hawkins plays Mrs. Reed, the widow of Jane's uncle who asked his wife to care for his beloved niece. Mrs. Reed has no love of compassion for her young niece and is all too eager to send her away to a school she knows will work hard to extinguish any passion the young girl has. Her time at the Lowood School was fraught with hardship, strict discipline that was more abusive than teaching, and extreme isolation. All of that being said, young Jane (played by Amelia Clarkson) manages to be brave, honest, and unyielding. Clarkson portrays the younger Jane Eyre wonderfully. While the young Jane is only in the film for the first 20 or so minutes, Clarkson gives you the kind of courage and righteousness that can only come from youth and naiveté.

By the time Jane leaves Lowood we are now introduced to Wasikowska who breathes depth and life into this character. This story is beautiful, but I will admit that in the wrong hands it could be done in a melodramatic manner. That's not the case here. Michael Fassbender plays Rochester and at the precise moment that you would expect to feel a connection between these two characters, you do! These two actors hit the nail on the head and the unintelligible link between the two of them almost palpable, even through the screen.

This story is carried by a wonderful cast, not the least of which is Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax. This movie was entertaining and worth the wait. It would be great if it was in wider release but if you are within 50miles of a theatre playing it, travel and see it! It's worth it!
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:47 am

http://bellesbookshelf.blogspot.com/2011/04/top-five-movie-adaptations.html

5. Jane Eyre. The latest version of Charlotte Bronte's classic romance is ah-mazing. Inevitably, big chunks of plot are left out, but it does a fantastic job of condensing hundreds of pages of story into a couple of hours of film. The important stuff is there, and then some. Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska are brilliant as Rochester and Jane, and their chemistry is crazy-hot. The passion which is so central to their story - and is sometimes missing in adaptations - sizzles and leaps off the screen. Swoon!
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:52 am

http://www.amusedbybooks.com/2011/04/books-made-into-movies-jane-eyre.html

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Books Made Into Movies: Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre

Studio: Focus Features
Originally Released: Mar. 2011
Running Time: 121 min.
Rating: PG-13

Synopsis: In a bold new feature version of Jane Eyre, director Cary Joji Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) infuse a contemporary immediacy into Charlotte Brontë’s timeless, classic story. Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds) star in the iconic lead roles of the romantic drama, the heroine of which continues to inspire new generations of devoted readers and viewers.

My Take: I was so excited to be able to go see this movie with one of my good girlfriends! We had both just recently read the book (click here for my review) and loved it and we were looking forward to seeing it on the big screen. Besides, the director, Cary Fukunaga is from Oakland, CA so we've got to represent!

Jane Eyre was only playing at the independent theaters in town and we are lucky enough in San Francisco to be blessed with a few; there is one even in the middle of the financial district where both of us work so we decided to meet up there one evening to watch the movie and go to dinner. It's a date!


If you've read the book than you have to go see this movie! Since the book was so fresh in my mind, I know that they stayed very true to the original storyline. While Bronte's telling is linear, the movie is not and that is probably the only real difference. The movie opens with Jane fleeing Rochester's home and winding up in St. John's and then we get flashback's throughout her life to find out why she has gotten herself into the predicament she has. It was a great way to set the stage.

The story is definitely a little spooky! There were points when we all jumped (and then giggled because it's not really scary, it's just the effects). But more than that, it's unendingly romantic. The scenes between Eyre and Rochester are just lovely! Granted, Rochester isn't the ugo Jane makes him out to be in the book which probably helps but wow, their chemistry was great!

So, if you can't catch this one in the theaters, then it is sure to not be missed at home when it comes out on DVD!
Posted by Amused at 4:00 AM
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:54 am

http://janeaustenfilmclub.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre-is-aboutlove.html

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Jane Eyre is about...love

Jane Eyre Paperback Cover by Vintage Classics

I said in an earlier post that one of the best compliments I could give the new film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's classic novel Jane Eyre is that it made me want to read it again. So of course, I have been rereading the novel in the past few weeks.
Now, first of all I have to remind my readers that I am not an English major, nor do I profess to be an expert in English lit. I do however have a passion for 19th century English literature. I also have a passion for seeing said novels well adapted for the screen. And by well adapted, I suppose I mean that I love it when the film transports me to the 19th century and makes me feel what the characters are feeling.

Can you feel the love between Jane and Mr. Rochester?
So, I'll tell you what I've been pondering this week. One of the things I loved about this new Jane Eyre film (other than the glorious scenery and cinematography) is the fact that it really made me think about love.

Jane and the hateful Mr. Brocklehurst
When it shows Jane as a little girl in Mrs. Reed's house in Gateshead, you really feel the lack of love in this little girl's life. When she goes to Lowood School, she feels the first real love she has ever felt from her wonderful friend and school mate, Helen. Heart achingly beautiful...

Thornfield Hall aka Haddon Hall
Of course, by the time she arrives at Thornfield Hall to be a governess to Mr. Rochester's ward Adele, she is looking for a home, a purpose and above all, the love which she now knows is out there somewhere for her. Of course, as we all know, she encounters a few obstacles to that love. After having her true love snatched from her, she is later offered something which was distinctly NOT love by St. John (Sinjun) Rivers. I just love the way she pushes the handsome and persuasive St. John away. She will work her fingers to the bone for him, but she will not marry without love.

Enough of love will follow????!!!!!
"I scorn your idea of love," I could not help saying, as I rose up and stood before him, leaning my back against the rock. "I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer: yes, St. John, and I scorn you when you offer it."

Rock on Jane!!!!!

Do you see where I am going here? I have to come back to the book to find the words that match up with those amazing images from the film. For me, I cannot have just the book. I cannot have just the film. I need both to be happy and satisfied.

This is what it is to be loved for one's self-
imperfections and all!
So what I have been doing over the past week or so is to reread my favourite parts of the book. This is a bad habit of mine, on a subsequent read, to skip over the parts that I did not enjoy even if they are critical to the plot. I love to read the juicy bits again and again. They meld in my mind with the visuals and music from the film and become one happy thought indeed.

Reader, she married him. And if you would like to read just the juicy bits, I have posted the 3 best chapters as pages on my blog.

First, we have the famous Chapter 27. This is where Jane has found out Mr. Rochester's secret and he is endeavouring to tell her how much she means to him and how he plans to keep her with him always. Sigh...

And then we have the lovely last two chapters. Chapter 37 & 38 describe her return to him and what happened afterward. If you felt a bit ripped off at the ending of Jane Eyre 2011 and found yourself yearning for Toby Stephens and Ruth Wilson from the 2006 miniseries like I did, you may want to read those last two chapters again. Charlotte Bronte will give you what Cary Fukunaga would not. Sigh...

P.S. The entire novel Jane Eyre is online if you need a little love today! Jane Eyre at online-literature.com
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:55 am

http://anthropologist.wordpress.com/2011/04/13/quotes-of-the-day-your-highness/

That said, self saw a fantastic movie today, Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre, with Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska. What self liked about this version were: the richly saturated cinematography; the fact that Mr. Rochester is such a jerk; and the screenplay — absolutely biting in a way that self can’t remember other “Jane Eyre” adaptations being. She wonders why young Jane had such full, Angelina Jolie-type lips, when Wasikowska’s lips are rather thin: can lips actually shrink as one grows from child to woman? Self doesn’t know why she gets hung up on such trivialities, but she does.

Self loved the fact that Mr. Rochester very pointedly had to put on his trousers after the almost-burned-to-death-if-not-for-Jane scene. Such intimacy — even before a single kiss or smoldering glance is exchanged. Self knew, from that moment on, Jane was a goner. Oh! And Jamie Bell’s in this movie as well, playing Mr. St. John Rivers as not entirely being without humor: one early clue to the excellence of this movie is that Jamie Bell’s role actually had some “meat” to it. In the last scene of the movie, Michael Fassbender was thin and scraggly and was a dead ringer for Guy Pearce in the Australian outlaw movie “The Proposition.”

Five stars. Absolutely gorgeous. An experience much like watching Kabuki, where even the smallest gesture is rich with symbolic significance (Self can make such a statement because she has actually sat through five hours of Kabuki. In Tokyo). Which is not to say the film is slow-paced. Or, even if it is slow-paced, one barely notices because each scene is so fraught with tremors of alarm — like a ghost movie, only with real ghosts.

Stay tuned.
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:56 am

http://jonlawsircy.wordpress.com/2011/04/13/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Recommended – If you want to see the B-team do their BBC thang

Ten years ago, this film would have starred Cate Blanchett and Daniel Day-Lewis. It would have been better than your average Jane Austen adaptation, and Charlotte Bronte might have had a chance to elbow Austen out of the way and get a bit more room in the millennium’s cultural imaginary. Soon, we’d have Jane Eyre lunchboxes, Pepsi cups, and Macy’s Parade floats adorned with Blanchett’s haunting face, pitched to us in the guise of ”plainness chic.” Instead, we get a belated 2011 version with no real critical or aesthetic exigency that swaths actors that wouldn’t be on the RSC varsity team in BBC clothing.

And I’m saying this as someone who thinks that the only reason to see this is the acting. The music is brought to you by the casio keyboard that produces most of the BBC production soundtracks. The score consists of a romantic piano soup topped with a dollop of violins, appropriately amped up any time we have an emotional climax. The only real interesting move on the film’s part is to mix the narrative up so that we begin with Jane’s retreat from Thornfield and get her story in increasingly long flashbacks. Unfortunately, the film forgets that it adopted this structure once Jane meets Rochester, so the point/counterpoint of such a structure loses its force.

The lead actors, Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, hold down the acting fort for 90% of the film. Wasikowska’s look is nothing if not other worldly, and she effectively conjures up the ethereal magnetism that the film thematically accords her. Fassbender is handsomely devilish, though he seems to have spent more time watching Olivier’s turn as Heathcliff (wrong Bronte, Michael!) than Welles’s turn as Rochester. The initial conversations between the two contain the requisite energy and spark. They have chemistry. Even Jane’s quiet scenes with her pupil and the maid Mrs. Fairfax (a delightful comedic role for Judi Dench) succeed.

The real problem comes when the two have to do some heavy lifting, namely in the engagement scene and the conclusion. Suddenly, the actors look out of their element. Their performances are less awkward (one might excuse the pair to be nervous) than inept. The fault lies with the director, Cary Funkunaga, who does nothing to aid the actors in the cinematography or mise-en-scene departments. Fassbender’s beard deserves particular oppobrium. It appears either to be grossly fake or grown in order to make the actor resemble a pale simulacrum of Ray Lamontagne at best and Joaquin Phoenix’s “I’m Still Here” look at worst.

My real problem with the film is that there seems to be nothing NEW here. It’s as though Jean Rhys had never written Wide Sargasso Sea, as though Madwoman in the Attic didn’t exist. Alternatively, the film doesn’t feel the need to even attempt to recuperate Rochester, to defend him against what has certainly been a steady 50 years of criticism. The movie offers a thoroughly competent but almost depressingly mundane reading of a woman who finds love with an equal…who married an insane woman…and then went blind…and contracted a horrible facial parasite that resembles a paste on beard.
By Jonathan Sircy, on April 13, 2011 at 3:39 am
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:03 am

http://markmarv2004-markssparks.blogspot.com/2011/04/silver-screen-stunners-and-stumblers.html

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
Silver screen stunners and stumblers
Just spent an interesting weekend viewing both a big-screen theater production and several videos. The initial offering was "Jane Eyre" which was playing at a very local arts theater. You know the type: low, saggy seats, lighting before the movie turned down so low that you can't see to find a place to sit, endless previews with ultra loud soundtracks (mostly in foreign languages), and a full contingent of Seniors looking for diversion, quiet, and a smattering of culture at bargain prices.

We chose the late afternoon showing which was probably a mistake since I was already hungry and the staff had just cranked out a new load of butter-drenched popcorn loaded with salt. The enticing scent of that popcorn and butter permeated both the theater and waiting area, but being mostly dietarily compliant, my partner and I dutifully took our places, empty handed except for our smuggled-in bottle water.

The main feature was "Jane Eyre," remembered by most of us as a high school reading assignment nightmare. At least that's my memory of my adolescent response to the weighty novel when it was assigned in the 11th or 12th grade. However, that was before I had visited Bronte Country in person a decade ago and breathed the smoky air from coal and peat fires, luxuriated in the glorious vistas of the West Yorkshire Pennines, and basked in the mists and filtered light of the rustic Borders' farms and pastures.

The movie's greatest strength for me was the care with which the photography was done, the precision of each scene or shot, and the inspired selection of locations where this very romantic story was filmed. The muted colors of the landscape and the creation of a really moist and somber Yorkshire atmosphere lent strong support to a story line which, on its face, felt to me (as a 2011 male) also to be somewhat damp, soft and limp.

The film is visually a marvel and, in that one regard at least, wonderful to watch. Judi Dench is at her best as Mrs. Fairfax, the Housekeeper of the estate of Lord Edward Rochester (played by Michael Fassbender whom I may or may not remember in "Inglourious Basterds"). Jane Eyre, cleverly and appropriately type cast, was played by Mia Wasikowska (who?) with understated elegance. The plot moves as slowly as a Scottish burn inching its way through an upland moor. There's not much action, adventure or excitement for those who crave it, but there's plenty of harsh and cruel psychological and emotional episodes. The film is more subtle than brash, more tender and about matters of the heart than about derring-do. For these reasons, my guess is that most women will appreciate this movie more than most men (not a sexist comment).

Unfortunately, the film is auditorily a problem for those of us who have hearing issues (even with aids) because of the Yorkshire accents and conversations which are often sotto voce, i.e., muted and private. Because I missed hearing more than half of the dialogue, I enjoyed this picture much less than my partner did (her hearing is fine, often too good). Consequently, for me the film was--overall--a stumbler. All things being equal, I would have rather seen the movie in high school than read the book; today, however, turning pages seems infinitely preferable.
Posted by markmarv2004 at 5:57 PM
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:04 am

http://nativeaudiogrrrl.blogspot.com/2011/04/my-review-jane-eyre.html

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
My Review: Jane Eyre
What perfect casting! I thought that every actor in this film was absolutely perfect in their roles. I just read this book around three months ago, and I loved it so I was really excited to see this film. So excited, in fact, that I took a bus up to Uptown to see it at a theatre I've never been to because it wasn't showing at the theatre I normally go to. Unlike Sucker Punch, the other movie that I was super excited to see, Jane Eyre did not disappoint. As I said before, it had perfect casting, especially Mia Wasikowska as the title character and Michael Fassbender as Mr. Rochester. What was interesting about this film was that several scenes were filmed as if it were a horror film. The novel was more about surprise than suspense, but I thought that there were parts of the film that were quite suspenseful. The film also does something that a lot of book to film adaptations do, and thats to rearrange the order a little bit. Instead of going chronologically like that book does, it starts out with her running away and entering the Rivers' house, and shows everything else as sort of a flashback.

I must be getting sappy in my old age of 20 (almost 21) because I never used to cry during romance films. The part where Mr. Rochester proposed to Jane turned on the water works for me. Having read the book, I knew what was going to happen, but both Wasikowska and Fassbender were so great in that scene that I just started tearing up. Also, Michael Fassbender is so sexy in this movie! I know that Mr. Rochester is supposed to be unattractive, but I really don't care! Every time that he was on screen I was just like "wooooooooow!" It makes me really excited to see him as Magneto...

If I had to pick something wrong with this movie it would have to be that I thought the ending was rather sudden, almost like they were trying to end it in a hurry. They don't explain what happened in the fire that much, so if you haven't read the book it will really seem like an abrupt ending. My rating: 9/10
Posted by kittyrocker08 at 4:49 PM
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:05 am

http://thecurrent-online.com/ae/jane-eyre-a-surprisingly-faithful-literary-adaptation/

Apr 122011

“Jane Eyre”: a surprisingly faithful literary adaptation
Posted by Mary Grace Buckley at 3:25

Jamie Bell as St. John (right) and Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre (left) in the romantic drama "JANE EYRE".

When the trailer for Cary Fukunaga’s (“Sin Nombre”) adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre” appeared on the Internet in December, hardcore Bronte fans and English majors freaked out so much that they could have been mistaken for comic book fanboys: Mr. Rochester is too handsome! It looks like a supernatural thriller! Alice cannot be Jane—she is too pretty! Dear God, they turned it into “Twilight!” And Kilowog probably will not even be in it!

While, the film’s trailer does make it look like something in the vein of “Twilight,” the movie itself is anything but.

The story begins in the middle of the book, when Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska, “Alice in Wonderland”) is wandering the moors, frightened for her future, until she faints on the doorstep of saintly country pastor St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell). Mr. Rivers and his two sisters nurse Jane back to health, and he gives her a post teaching country girls in a newly opened school. Then the audience learns of Jane’s past through flashbacks: first, her unhappy childhood with her horrible aunt, Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins), then her education at Lowood School for Girls, and finally, her tenure as governess at the isolated Thornfield Hall, inhabited by the sarcastic, but broodingly sexy Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender, “Inglourious Basterds”). After several months at Thornfield, things look like they might be looking up for Jane, but Mr. Rochester has been hiding a dark secret.

This is very much an art film, slowly paced with gorgeous cinematography. The film uses many wide shots at the beginning to show the dreariness of the moors, and from that point on, the lighting has a brightness to it that makes even the sunniest days that Thornfield seem cold and distant, slightly out of reach, not unlike Jane’s relationship with Rochester.

As far as book-to-film adaptations go, this one is probably one of the best and most faithful in recent memory. The script adds no subplots or characters, but instead drops a couple of them in order to streamline the plot; it also manages to boil down some of Bronte’s more verbose dialogue passages (including a speech from Rochester that lasts about six more pages than it should) into several effective sentences. The cast, overall, turns in superb performances. Wasikowska and Fassbender have a wonderful simmering chemistry, showing that it is possible to be sexy without onscreen sex. And Bell somehow manages to make the cinematic Mr. Rivers more interesting than his literary counterpart. Some purists may complain that they are all too attractive for the roles, but these characters, unlike the ones in “Twilight” and similar romantic dramas, actually draw the audience in with their personalities instead of being cardboard-cutout fantasies. “Jane Eyre” is aesthetically pleasing but also has a soul
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:05 am

http://www.circlecinema.com/news/jane-eyre

Jane Eyre
Apr 12, 2011 No Comments by Chuck

Opens Friday, April 29.

A mousy governess who softens the heart of her employer soon discovers that he’s hiding a terrible secret.

In a bold new feature version of Jane Eyre, director Cary Joji Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) infuse a contemporary immediacy into Charlotte Brontë’s timeless, classic story. Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds) star in the iconic lead roles of the romantic drama, the heroine of which continues to inspire new generations of devoted readers and viewers.

In the 19th Century-set story, Jane Eyre (played by Ms. Wasikowska) suddenly flees Thornfield Hall, the vast and isolated estate where she works as a governess for Adèle Varens, a child under the custody of Thornfield’s brooding master, Edward Rochester (Mr. Fassbender). The imposing residence – and Rochester’s own imposing nature – have sorely tested her resilience. With nowhere else to go, she is extended a helping hand by clergyman St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell of Focus Features’ The Eagle) and his family. As she recuperates in the Rivers’ Moor House and looks back upon the tumultuous events that led to her escape, Jane wonders if the past is ever truly past…

Aged 10, the orphaned Jane (played by Amelia Clarkson) is mistreated and then cast out of her childhood home Gateshead by her cruel aunt, Mrs. Reed (Golden Globe Award winner Sally Hawkins). Consigned to the charity school Lowood, Jane encounters further harsh treatment but receives an education and meets Helen Burns (Freya Parks), a poor child who impresses Jane as a soulful and contented person. The two become firm friends. When Helen falls fatally ill, the loss devastates Jane, yet strengthens her resolve to stand up for herself and make the just choices in life.

As a teenager, Jane arrives at Thornfield. She is treated with kindness and respect by housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax (Academy Award winner Judi Dench). Jane’s interest is piqued by Rochester, who engages her in games of wit and storytelling, and divulges to her some of his innermost thoughts. But his dark moods are troubling to Jane, as are strange goings-on in the house – especially the off-limits attic. She dares to intuit a deep connection with Rochester, and she is not wrong; but once she uncovers the terrible secret that he had hoped to hide from her forever, she flees, finding a home with the Rivers family. When St. John Rivers makes Jane a surprising proposal, she realizes that she must return to Thornfield – to secure her own future and finally, to conquer what haunts both her and Rochester.

A Focus Features presentation in association with BBC Films of a Ruby Films production. Jane Eyre. Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, and Judi Dench. Casting by Nina Gold. Co-Producers, Mairi Bett, Faye Ward. Music by Dario Marianelli. Costume Designer, Michael O’Connor. Make-up and Hair Designer, Daniel Phillips. Production Designer, Will Hughes-Jones. Film Editor, Melanie Ann Oliver. Director of Photography, Adriano Goldman. Executive Producers, Christine Langan, Peter Hampden. Produced by Alison Owen, Paul Trijbits. Based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë. Screenplay by Moira Buffini. Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. A Focus Features Release.
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:06 am

http://thatsmyrabbit.wordpress.com/2011/04/12/with-eighteen-months-nothing-else-on-my-plate/

Tomorrow I’ll be seeing Jane Eyre for the second time (which is almost too bad because I wasn’t terribly impressed the first time, but Mr. Rochester is a new obsession of mine and Michael Fassbender is perfect) before going out to a late lunch with my aunt, all followed by meeting up with a good friend of mine in the evening.

Yes, I’d say tomorrow is going to be a grand day.
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:08 am

http://armchairaudience.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre.html

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
Jane Eyre

A very good adaptation of Bronte's Jane Eyre. Mia Wasikowska is perfect as plain Jane, nailing her combination of submission and steeliness, and Michael Fassbender is a Byronic and arrogant Rochester. Their scenes together, especially the conversations in which Rochester tries to needle Jane, are brilliant. Everything else works well, from Judi Dench as lonely Miss Fairfax to the physical, raw feel of the setting, to Dario Marianelli's score. It's not a particularly original take but that's a good thing.

Posted by Peter Swanson at 11:47 AM
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:09 am

http://www.julujewelry.com/2011/04/vintage-luxe-heart-earrings-jane-eyre.html

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
Vintage Luxe Heart Earrings & Jane Eyre
Last weekend I went on a Jane Eyre kick and watched a bunch of adaptations.

Toby Stephens and Ruth Wilson 2006
It was very satisfying and complete. Emotional enough for me to tear up once or twice. Since it was so long it is easy to get sucked in to their world.

Timothy Dalton 1983
I only scrubbed through this version on YouTube, but he's still quite enticing in his prime. I recognized him as Volkov from Chuck.

1997
The first adaptation I ever saw. Probably 5+ years ago so I don't remember much besides liking it.

2011
Mia Wasikowska as Jane and ­Michael Fassbender as Edward Rochester. In Theaters NOW! You might recognizer Mia from Alice in Wonderland...

I find that Rochester was not as tormented as in the other adaptations. He comes off as devilishly wicked & playful- which is fine by me! Probably the best acting, music, & cinematography of them all, but my eyes only watered up a couple of times and not enough to make tears. I don't know why. I think I had too many things on my mind! The chemistry is not lacking. The place where this falls behind the first adaptation I mentioned is the length. At 2 hours it's not enough to cover a 500 page book so I'm left wanting to see this and that. If you liked the artsy and updated Pride and Prejudice of 2005 you will enjoy this too (except it's not cheery, but Gothic). I highly recommend this! GOD I even want to see it again!!
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:12 am

http://balletbookworm.blogspot.com/2011/04/jane-eyre-on-screenat-last.html

12 April 2011
Jane Eyre (on screen...at last)
*Quick note: I'm going to assume that the plot of Jane Eyre is widely known so beware because I'm going to talk about spoilers. You're forewarned.

I was seriously ready to drive 100 miles to see the new feature-length adaptation of Jane Eyre. Not joking. For over a month, the only movie theatre near me listed as showing Jane Eyre was in Des Moines. But all of a sudden...Focus Features and Marcus Theatres updated their websites to show more theatres in Iowa showing the movie starting April 8 including one in town. Finally, but I would have liked to have the information farther in advance of the opening than April 6.

I loved it. Jane Eyre in Cary Fukunaga's hands is a beautiful period film. The composition of each shot is sublime regardless of long or close, interior or exterior, and the natural beauty of Derbyshire is used to great effect. Occasionally the editing feels a little long, like the camera can't take it's lens off a beautiful scene. Although the takes are fabulous, perhaps a few seconds less on the exterior location shots, tighter editing, would allow for more interaction among the characters without taking away from the setting. On the other hand, the film does nod toward the Gothic elements of the novel through the editing without getting pulled into the supernatural. Good example: Jane telling Adele a spooky story then scares herself - and the audience - on the way to Millcote when a bird is startled out of a bush; the audience gets a good jump.

My friend (Jessica, thanks for coming to see the film with me!) noticed a an interesting interplay on the themes of imprisonment and freedom in the composition of the shots. Many shots include bars or items that look like cages (the lead holding the window panes, the windows in Adele's dollhouse, Jane's corset laces as she frantically tries to get out of her wedding dress); these contrast with shots of birds or characters looking out of windows. Jane frequently notes that she is a freeborn creature, contrasting with Bertha's imprisonment on the upper story of Thornfield.

The novel adaptation is quite good. Moira Buffini keeps the important events in the novel but reorders the story to give a fresh aspect. We start by watching Jane flee Thornfield and fortuitously wind up on the Rivers' front step. Jane's story is told in flashback, without voiceovers (thank you), keeping the adaptation unique while hewing to the novel. Buffini does compress the novel so I did miss a few things because I didn't get a good sense of time passing. Bronte gives fantastic verbal interplay to Jane and Rochester in the novel but the movie focused less on this and more on visuals; the composition and editing of the movie coveys much of the same feeling but you don't get as much intellectual depth to Jane and Rochester's courtship. Now, I heard some people muttering on the way out of the theatre that it was "boring"...did you expect an action movie? Did you never read the book? The book is good because a) the plot to get Jane and Rochester together, then apart, then together and b) Jane's inner monologue because she thinks a lot. Aside from a few moments of high drama, the book is quiet (I do have to thank Buffini for reordering the movie because we lose the very long section with the Rivers family and get back to Rochester much quicker).

The casting for Jane Eyre is excellent. Mia Wasikowska plays Jane with gravity and she also handles the period costume well (she does look plain but fascinating in her gaze, which the point because Jane isn't ugly, she's just not drop dead gorgeous). Judi Dench plays a wonderful Mrs. Fairfax, the sensible widowed housekeeper (who also gets the good asides). And my new favorite actor to watch (easy on the eyes and very talented) Michael Fassbender is a great Rochester; he plays Rochester as a frustrated man - doomed by his fate thus making him gruff, stand-offish, and changeable - and I think this allows him to show more emotion (when he introduces Bertha to Jane after the aborted wedding Fassbender chooses to be tender with Bertha, something that is handled differently than other interpretations I've seen). Additionally, I think Fassbender is the right age for Rochester, rather than too young; I've never thought of Rochester being close to fifty (if you assume he married Bertha when he was young and stupid, i.e. before twenty-five, he'd be no more than forty when he meets Jane) so the casting of Fassbender (in his mid-thirties) with Wasikowska (only about twenty during shooting) makes sense.

Now that I finally got a chance to see Jane Eyre I don't know what I'm going to look forward to seeing in theatres now. Anonymous (a thriller about the true identity of Shakespeare) opens in September with a great cast, the new Three Musketeers (which looks very over-the-top, I really hope so) comes out in November, the next Sherlock Holmes opens in December, the X-Men reboot is this summer along with the final Harry Potter movie, I think A Dangerous Method is slated to release this year (it's in post but I couldn't find a solid release date), and there is a new Wuthering Heights opening in the UK in September but I don't know if it has a US distributor.

Now, previews (there may have been another but we got there in the middle of a preview since we arrived a little later than planned):
1. The Greatest Movie Ever Sold: documentary by the guy from Super Size Me; seems too much of a gimmick to me but could be interesting
2. Beginners: looks very interesting, a people story about a man whose father comes out to him after his mother dies; great cast (Ewan McGregor, Melanie Laurent, and Christopher Plummer)
3. Hoodwinked 2: I am not even kidding; WHY did this trailer show before Jane Eyre? Completely different audiences; the problem of simply being a terrible movie aside, it didn't even look funny
Posted by Melissa at 10:36 AM
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:16 am

http://askmissa.com/2011/04/12/review-of-jane-eyre-movie/

Review of Jane Eyre Movie

By Laura Katz Leacu

April 12, 2011 0 Comments

I was probably about 14 years old the last time I read Charlotte Brontë’s classic Jane Eyre. I really wish I’d re-read it before going to see Cary Fukunaga’s new film adaptation. The movie is beautiful, with huge, sweeping, dramatic vistas of the tortured Jane wildly traversing the moors. (Do “moors” exist in Victorian England? Or am I getting this confused with the other Brontë sister’s Yorkshire? Whatever, it was cool.) At its heart, Jane Eyre is part Gothic horror-story, and many scenes at the Thornfield estate kept me on the edge of my seat. Mia Wasikowska was last seen in The Kids Are All Right – as well as Tim Burton’s recent adaptation of Alice in Wonderland – and she certainly shows her range here as Jane, exuding cool distance when warranted, muted feistiness when appropriate, and tear-stained, agonizing grief when reasonable. The incomparable, favorite-ever Judi Dench, in an uncharacteristic straight-woman role, shines as the housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax. But the real treat here (at least for me) is Michael Fassbender in the role of Rochester. Ooooooooh…my. I’m getting chills just remembering. Fassbender has a voice like sexy, sexy gravel. His scenes with Jane are so fiercely intense that I had the urge to douse myself in my Icee just to get through the movie. Fassbender was recently seen as an English-soldier-disguised-as-Nazi in the tavern scene in Inglorious Basterds. I plan to see him in every single movie he does from this point forward. I hope for more passionate, disheveled scenes. Preferably with shirt at least half unbuttoned.

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre

I saw Jane Eyre with two very old friends. We’ve been through thick and thin together, but I do believe they nearly disowned me when I revealed my feelings about Jane and Rochester’s eventual union (we all knew the story already…right? Is this a spoiler? Ugh, okay, yes, they end up together and he has a crazy ex-wife in the attic. There, you’re welcome). I was so, so concerned! I felt like she was a girlfriend making a bad decision, one that I’d talk about endlessly behind her back while trying to put on a brave face for her in person. Not only was Rochester a haunted man from the moment they met, but by the time Jane decides to give him her entire life he’s also…well…blind. And even more haunted. She has a long, long life ahead of her. (I seem to actually recall feeling the same way when I read the story as a young ‘un, which makes me think I was kind of an unsentimental little thing).

But my friends were not going to let this go without a fight, and – wonderful and well adjusted as they are – reminded me of many things about the story that I’d forgotten. To many scholars, the book is considered an important early feminist novel. Jane is educated. She’s strong. She isn’t interested in money. She’s independent, and this is the life she chooses for herself. Additionally (it was pointed out), Rochester’s decision to lock his first wife away is actually seen as a noble one. The only other option for women with mental illness in this era was a madhouse, with terrible conditions. Really, he too is a passionate, intelligent man with morals and principles – making him an even more perfect match for Jane.

So, though overall I’m torn, I do have even more respect for Brontë. With stories like Jane Eyre is it possible that she and her contemporaries normalized women making independent decisions about their lives and their mates? Is it because of Brontë that I can, in fact, put thought into my own decisions and those of my friends? Is she the one that’s given me the ability to question such decisions, show concern when they’re risky, and celebrate them when they turn into accomplishments? It seems that this may indeed be the case, and I’m grateful to Fukunaga to bringing the story to a new generation of passionate, accomplished women. I urge all to see the movie, and to decide for themselves.
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:16 am

http://colewebbharter.com/2011/04/11/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre
Posted on 11 April 2011 by Cole Webb Harter

“What is your tale of woe?”

“I want your love and I want you revenge

You and me could write a bad romance . . .”

—Lady Gaga, “Bad Romance”

Jane Eyre is an incredibly dark, sensuous, mysterious, and passionate work of obsessive gothic romance: a film every bit as beautiful in its prose as in its poetry. It reminds us that audiences still love the epic melodramas of the Golden Age. In subject matter and story material it recalls the bizarre, gothic masterpiece of obsession and macabre Rebecca. In theme and in spirit it reminds me of the ever-wonderful psychosexual thriller Black Narcissus. Truly, this film is not of this generation. In a time when audiences prefer to have everything spelled out to them and nothing left to mystery or the imagination, Jane Eyre forces us to think and imagine in ways few films do. It creates a sense of foreboding and chilling uneasiness by merely filming a room in a certain way and in a certain light. As a filmgoer who enjoys a great piece of dark morbidity I say, “Thank God for this new adaptation of the classic novel!”, for I was beginning to hypothesize that all the truly macabre films had died out and the only dark and obsessive movies out there were the cheap torture-horror flicks like the wicked Saw and its exponential amount of sequels.

Jane Eyre is of course an adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë classic concerning the eponymous heroine here played by Mia Wasikowska delivering a near-silent yet powerful performance. At the beginning we are introduced to the young girl as a timid, yet willful soul who through several tragedies has become an impenetrable fortress of aloofness. She arrives at an enormous British manner called Thornhill in order to serve as governess to the ward of the wealthy Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender), master of the house. Judi Dench plays the kindly housekeeper who helps Jane learn her way about the great house, but it is evident to both us and Jane that something is not quite Kosher about the house. Mr. Rochester is as mysterious and impenetrable as Jane is, yet he seems to see something in her, and after a series of inexplicable adventures together including a fire with no perceivable cause and an attempted murder of one of their guests the two become quite good friends. However, Mr. Rochester seems plagued by some unspoken terror or guilt, and Jane begins to wonder what haunts her newfound acquaintance.

The filmmakers have chosen to tell the story slowly, taking their time not to rush anything and careful to pay attention to details. Director Fukunga uses every shot to its uttermost effect. His choice of images weaves a beautiful lyric poem, yet in place of rhyme and meter he uses angles and frames. The film is a poem of the visual sense. Still, for all the time spent on versification the screenwriters also managed to tell a dark, frightening, and riveting story. As I said, the film reminds me most of 1940’s Rebecca and 1947’s Black Narcissus: a gothic psycho-melodrama about love and repressed passion. The film’s color timing is very dark (to the point where sometimes we can hardly see anything on screen), contributing to the overarching atmosphere of dark obsession. In some ways, Jane Eyre could be a thriller. It is mysterious and complex, yet many of its scenes are downright scary. This is not your typical 19th-century women’s romance novel. This is no Sense and Sensibility nor is it Pride and Prejudice. No, this tale is a far grimmer and mysterious, almost like a haunted house story. The house is certainly haunted by something, whether by something real or by Mr. Rochester’s seemingly unhappy past is not to be revealed in this review.

There is a wonderful scene when Rochester and Jane first meet in which he questions her ability to be a good governess. He asks her many odd questions using a queer phraseology that implies something more than what the questions propose. Then he asks her, “What is your tale of woe?” Unsure how to answer, Jane goes over her childhood: orphaned and sent to live with an aunt who sent her to a dreadfully unpleasant school for girls. It is a scene that seems to sum up both Jane and Rochester’s characters in a few words. Both have a sad history to tell, yet cannot find anyone to whom to tell it. Over the course of Jane’s stay at Thornhill as a governess, the friendship slowly blossoms into an enigmatic love between the two and finally Rochester proposes. Initially Jane protests, but within a matter of minutes she happily accepts. A round of thunder cracks above them as they embrace, perhaps foreshadowing what is to come. Like anything else in this grim saga, their engagement begins happily, but Rochester’s apocryphal past begins to undermine the bond that the two have formed. Soon, Jane finds herself—as the song goes—caught in a bad romance.

The film caught my attention from the very first shot and never let it go. With each unfolding plot point the film enthralled me more and more and I found myself quite unable to turn away from it. It’s one of those films that at some point ceases to be a movie (at least in the mind) and becomes something true and meaningful. It’s tough to pinpoint exactly what the message of this particular tale is, though I’m sure there is one. Perhaps it’s an anthem for pessimism, or an early feminist saga. Whatever the ultimate theme of the story, the filmmakers certainly did a good job relating it. We must always remember that film is a visual medium and must preferably tell its story with as few words a possible. Jane Eyre does this to the uttermost, never using a word unless absolutely necessarily. Instead the director chose to use his camera as a means to tell this rare and beautifully dark story.

I have a lot of respect for Jane Eyre the character and now Jane Eyre the new film. This is a wonderfully crafted tale unlike many things you’re likely to see these days. It is gruesome and frightening without being bloody. It is psychotic and obsessive without any mass-murderers. It is tense and sensual without being pornographic. Perhaps this was an exercise in the virtue of temperance. The best films always leave us wanting more and Jane Eyre leaves us wanting much more. At the end we want many more answers and much more explanations than the film is willing to give us. But that’s us typical greedy humans wanting knowledge that is not for us to know. Certainly it was made with no small budget, but I would imagine the same director and screenwriters could have made just as good of a film with much less money. Jane Eyre is a film for previous decades. Fortunately, audiences still enjoy the dark and macabre, the gothic and the obsessive melodramas of 19th century romance. So, applause for this new version of an old tale. It is beyond me to find any significant errors here. What a truly poetic and elegant film this was.

BBC Films and Focus Features presents

Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Su Elliot, Amelia Clarkson, Imogen Poots, Sally Hawkins, Romy Settbon Moore. Directed by Cary Fukunaga

Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content. Release Date: 11 March 2011
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Post by Admin on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:29 am

http://processedgrass.blogspot.com/2011/04/taking-on-2011-top-films-quarterly.html

Monday, April 11, 2011
Taking on 2011 - Top Films (Quarterly Review)
A tad overdue (curse you, term papers!), but the Quarterly Review moves on with the final entry until the wonderful month of June where the birds have risen from the ash, shattered the eggshells, dusted off the icky placenta of inexperience, spread their wings, consumed the mother's regurgitation. The flowers are fickle, they could leave you with the turn of Mother Earth's axis, I will be here forever. Pull out the reels, put on the critical cap, join me for this journey. We can never truly escape the danger zone.

2. Jane Eyre

The latest adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's classic novel is a visual feast, composed of striking shots of a hostile country that houses a disturbing number of individuals. The film, naturally, loses a bit in translation, but Bronte's words come to life thanks to the lead performances. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender set a chilling back and forth between their two characters that propels the film forward. It avoids, at times, some of the more complex themes that the film briefly touches on, namely the repugnance of the Rochester character and the individual desires of Jane, but the film is a technical marvel that stands out as the best period piece released in a good number of years.
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:02 pm

http://www.lfpress.com/entertainment/movies/2011/04/15/18001911.html

Fresh Eyre

MOVIE REVIEW: Bronte's classic heroine brought to vivid life

By LIZ BRAUN, QMI Agency

Last Updated: April 15, 2011 8:58am

I loved it.

There may be some two dozen other TV and film versions at your disposal, but this new Jane Eyre, from director Cary Fukunaga, is a must-see proposition.

Charlotte Bronte's tale of the strong-minded orphan who becomes a governess and finds herself in the employ of the intimidating Mr. Rochester has been translated for the screen with all the romance, mystery and gothic atmosphere intact.

This Jane (Mia Wasikowska) is a self-possessed seeker of truth who will not be bullied as a child or intimidated as an adult.

We meet Jane first as a fugitive. She is seen fleeing a grand house and wandering the countryside until she washes up, sick and delirious, at the door of St. John Rivers and his sisters.

They take her in and care for Jane, and as she recovers her health, her story is told in flashback.

Here she is as a child, hiding from her punishing cousin and being treated with exquisite cruelty by her aunt (Sally Hawkins).

Jane is an orphan, and as her aunt declares her willful and dishonest, she is sent off to boarding school.

More hardship and deprivation follow, but Jane eventually becomes a teacher, and then is hired to be the governess at Thornfield Hall.

Now she tutors Adele, the ward of Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Her companion in the huge, mostly empty pile is the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench).

Eventually the distant Mr. Rochester turns up on one of his infrequent visits.

He is intrigued by Jane at once.

She is attracted to Mr. Rochester, but watchful; they are, obviously, separated by huge class differences in the way of money and station.

And then there's Miss Ingram, a woman Jane believes to be Mr. Rochester's fiancee.

Still, some sort of relationship slowly develops between Jane and Rochester, at the same time strange and unsettling things are going on at Thornfield Hall.

Mr. Rochester appears to have many secrets.

Jane Eyre is lighted and photographed to painterly effect, with lots of Georges de La Tour-type moments involving inky black rooms and people holding candles.

The film is slow and still, and every moment in it is visually stunning.

We haven't even got to the period detail or the complicated, formal English, but it's all there, and it's wonderful to witness.

Furthermore, Wasikowska and Fassbender are well-matched in their roles and in their superb performances.

This version of Jane Eyre brings Jane's moral courage and independence to the forefront, and Wasikowska is perfect in the role.

But enough.

It should be said that for some viewers, Jane Eyre will be every bit as thrilling as watching paint dry.

Those keen on a literary period drama, however -- and you know who you are -- will enjoy this new take on Bronte's heroine.

liz.braun@sunmedia.ca

JANE EYRE * * * * *

What: Drama directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga

Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Dame Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins

Where: Hyland Cinema, 240 Wharncliffe Rd. (519-913-0312)
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:03 pm

http://www.idahostatesman.com/2011/04/15/1605922/jane-eyre-offers-dark-romance.html

‘Jane Eyre’ offers dark romance and drama
BY COLIN COVERT - STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS)
Published: 04/15/11

***1/2 Rated: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender. Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender. Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga. Running time: 120 minutes. Theater: Flicks.

“Poor, obscure, plain and little” is how the heroine of “Jane Eyre” describes herself. The latest film of Charlotte Bronte’s moody Gothic romance is anything but. There is not a drab image or a middling performance in the piece. The freewheeling adaptation drops needless scenes and spurs the story ahead with momentum.

From the very first shot, this new version frames Jane (Mia Wasikowska, Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland”) as a character of mystery and drama. We meet her as a young woman on the run in a rural downpour. What peril she is fleeing is unspecified. Jane is taken in by a dour young clergyman (Jamie Bell), and nursed back to health by his sisters whose Christian charity and curiosity about their new friend run neck-and-neck. Jane is many scenes into her recovery and subsequent adventures before the story circles back to her breathless flight, explaining all.

It’s a bold approach, but one that honors Bronte’s favorite literary gimmick. She was a master of generating suspense by dropping clues and hints while withholding the secrets we’re dying to discover. This flashback-filled adaptation, written by Moira Buffini and directed by Cary Fukunaga, does her proud.

As Jane moves from her loveless childhood into the manor house governess position that was every Victorian orphan girl’s glass ceiling, Wasikowska masters the screen actor’s magic trick of transfixing our attention while seemingly doing nothing. Her beauty is tamped down here, but when it blossoms she is a pre-Raphaelite dream in the flesh.

As the cold, taunting master of the house, Mr. Rochester, Michael Fassbender has ice in his smile but fire in his eyes. When he invites Jane to his fireside for evening conversations, his tone is brusque and challenging yet almost intimate. He is decadent, subtly evil, unreachable yet irresistible. Jane, naive about certain dark aspects of human nature, opens her heart. And then terrible truths come crashing down, impelling that tear-stained dash across a rainswept Yorkshire moor.

This “Jane Eyre” is unapologetic melodrama shot through with inspiration. Diehard “Twilight” fans looking for a deeper, darker romantic mystery would do well to check it out.
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:04 pm

http://www.theithacajournal.com/article/20110414/ENT/104140354/1124/New-Jane-Eyre-8212-not-necessary-nice?odyssey=nav|head

New 'Jane Eyre' — not necessary, but nice
12:00 PM, Apr. 14, 2011 |

Did the world need another version of "Jane Eyre"? There have been more than a dozen adaptations, dating back to as early as 1910 — including the Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles classic from 1943, the dreamy 1996 Franco Zeffirelli film starring Charlotte Gainsbourg and William Hurt, the 1997 version broadcast in the U.S. on the A&E channel which starred Samantha Morton and Cirán Hinds and, most recently, the 2006 Masterpiece Theatre entry starring Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens.

I've seen all of those, and enjoyed them — and I liked Cary Fukunaga's new version, too. Is it ground-breaking? Does it bring some thrilling new insight into Charlotte Bronte's novel? Well, not really. But Fukunaga does an able job of bringing the classic tale to life — and, in particular, inhabiting the story's physical and emotional space. With its dark shadows and long tracking shots down the Gothic halls and walled paths of Thornfield Hall, the film puts you into the tiny-but-sturdy shoes of the title character, the famed heroine whose "small, poor, obscure and plain" exterior contains an indomitable spirit.

Here, Jane is played by Mia Wasikowska ("Alice in Wonderland," "The Kids are All Right"), a fine young actress who captures Jane's intelligence, passion and moral strength. Michael Fassbender, a German-Irish actor probably most familiar to American audiences for "Inglourious Basterds," makes a suitably forbidding and tortured Mr. Rochester.

Since, frankly, most people inclined to see the film are likely familiar with the plot — Jane survives a miserable childhood, becomes a governess at the imposing estate of Mr. Rochester, and the two fall in love despite a mysterious impediment involving strange noises in the attic — the pleasures of a new "Jane Eyre" inevitably lie beyond the twists and turns. The latest version does offer a novel narrative structure, opening with a sequence that normally comes toward the end, as Jane seeks shelter in the isolated home of a minister (Jamie Bell) and his sisters, and telling the story in flashback. It works, adding to the general mood of heightened passion and heart-wrenching loss. Add to that some gorgeous countryside, period dress and the possibility of a happy ending ... and you've got yourself a tasty costume drama.

Stars: 3 1/2
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:17 pm

http://media.www.mesapress.com/media/storage/paper1046/news/2011/04/14/Entertainment/Jane-Eyre.Will.Please.Both.Fans.Of.English.Literature.And.Movie.Goers-3993436.shtml

Jane Eyre will please both fans of English literature and movie goers
Movie Review
Lauren J. Mapp
Issue date: 4/14/11 Section: Entertainment

Perfectly scripted, cast and executed, the newest film rendition of Charlotte Brontë's "Jane Eyre" is full of powerful emotions and is certain to please both fans of English literature and cinema-junkies alike.

It is always perplexing how Hollywood can ruin such amazing pieces of classic literature, so audiences should be thankful to director Cary Fukunaga and screenwriter Moira Buffini for keeping the integrity of "Jane Eyre" intact.

This film, and the classic novel that it is based on, tells the story of Jane Eyre, played by Mia Wasikowska, and the events that led to her leaving her governess position in the home of Mr. Rochester, played by Michael Fassbender.

After a painful early childhood that included Jane's loss of both of her parents, an abusive cousin and living with an aunt who thinks she is a compulsive liar, the young Jane, played by Amelia Clarkson, is placed in boarding school. Years of being smacked by rulers and memorizing lessons mold Jane into a the prim, young governess who arrives at Mr. Rochester's estate to teach Adele Varens, played by Romy Settborn.

Nights of witty banter between Jane and Mr. Rochester build a friendship, through which Jane finds herself falling in love. It is not long though before she realizes that he is hiding a dark secret within the walls of his home.

Wasikowska is the perfect Jane Eyre; though beautiful her look is also somewhat plain and her performance in the role is absolutely exquisite. Fassbender displays the perfect balance between being a rugged, older gentleman and his gentle, passionate side. The onscreen chemistry between Wasikowska and Fassbender is fiery and intriguing and the two actors play off each other wonderfully.

The young actresses in this film show a cinematic range not often seen in supporting characters. Clarkson embodies the restless, young Jane so well that you forget that her screen time is minimal. Settborn as Jane's pupil Adele is charming in her role as the young, French orphan.

"Jane Eyre" will inspire audience members to go home and actually read the book - a notion which died long ago with the invention of Cliff's Notes. Some scenes will tug your heartstrings, while others will engage you to laugh at the dark and dry British humor.

The cast brings life to the classic novel with a spectrum of emotional depth that is sure not to disappoint.
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:18 pm

http://www.wwlp.com/dpp/entertainment/movies/box_office/jane-eyre

"Jane Eyre"
Michael Fassbender, Mia Wasikowska, Judi Dench

Updated: Sunday, 17 Apr 2011, 1:36 PM EDT
Published : Sunday, 17 Apr 2011, 1:35 PM EDT

Rated PG-13
2 hours

Get yourself in the mood for the umpteenth remake of Charlotte Bronte's dark, brooding love story, "Jane Eyre." And this version gets it right.

Victorian England was no place for a defiant, strong willed young woman of modest means until Jane went to work for Mr. Rochester, the mysterious lord of the manner. And then watch the dramatic fireworks begin. Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska generate smoldering chemistry together.

The atmosphere's as bleak and forbidding as the author designed it to be. It's a story of social barriers crumbling at the altar of passionate love.

The classic story of a determined woman's changing place in stodgy society plays extremely well for a modern audience. The picture benefits from the great Judi Dench. Nobody bolsters a period piece quite the way she does. And the literary dialogue still has a charming ring to it.

"Jane Eyre's" a classy film for a classy audience. No matter how grubby Hollywood becomes with its lowest common denominator Summer blockbusters, movies like "Jane Eyre" will always attract moviegoers who appreciate the quality that only a classic can generate.

And when Mr. Rochester offers Jane his hand, I was thinking, at least he's anxious to marry her, unlike most modern day love stories. "Jane Eyre" is a timeless classic and this stirring production hits home with 3 stars. Take my advice, make a date with "Jane Eyre."
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:21 pm

http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/movies/119964874.html

Posted on Sat, Apr. 16, 2011

Our critics' selections

By Carrie Rickey

Inquirer Film Critic
Jane Eyre Unmoored on the moors, chastely passionate Mia Wasikowska gives a brisk and refreshing interpretation of the governess attracted to her gloomy and mysterious employer, played with wit and wile by Michael Fassbender. PG-13

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska in the romantic drama "Jane Eyre." The proposal scene, atremble with passion, is killer.
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Post by Admin on Sun Apr 17, 2011 3:22 pm

http://www.dailynewstranscript.com/archive/x1225322704/12-films-we-like-better-than-Rio#axzz1JoB0hhuK

12 films we like better than 'Rio'

By Staff reports
wickedlocal.com
Posted Apr 14, 2011 @ 01:38 PM

JANE EYRE (PG-13) Strong performances by Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender help justify yet another adaptation of “Jane Eyre.” The two actors create a smoldering chemistry that is palpable and potent, as they play the classic star-crossed lovers haunted by their pasts. The film is quite faithful to the Charlotte Bronte’s romantic classic. (B)
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