Top News
WE CONTINUE TO SUPPORT MICHAEL-AN AWARD WINNING ACTOR

Congratulations to the cast and crew of "12 Years a Slave" winning an Oscar for Best Picture

Michael is currently filming "MacBeth"

Watch "12 Years A Slave" and "Frank" in theaters

Watch "The Counselor" and "12 Years A Slave" on DVD available now

Michael is set to star and produce on a film version of the video game "Assassin's Creed"

Completed projects: X-Men, Untitled Malik project

Upcoming projects Assassin's Creed, Prometheus 2, MacBeth,and more!

Header credit here

MFmultiply's Disclaimer


Order region 1 dvds-Amazon store

Order region 2-UK dvds-Amazon Shoppe

Please check the calender for films on TV, Theater, or dvd releases
November 2017
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Calendar Calendar


Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Page 5 of 6 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Jul 30, 2011 12:14 am

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/jane-eyre-review-20110729-1i3ux.html

Jane Eyre: review
Simone Mitchell
July 13, 2011

Try U-verse Risk Free at ATT.com - 30 Day Money Back Guarantee.
Jane Eyre - Trailer

A governess finds herself falling in love with her employer. Screening at the Melbourne International Film Festival 2011.

Cary Fukunaga’s screen adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel is one of the finest to date.

The script, which was penned by Moira Buffini, appeared on the 2008 Brit List (a film-industry-compiled list of the best unproduced screenplays in British film). It’s this strong script combined with a powerful performance from the leads that makes this dark-retelling stand out from the crowd.

Canberra-born Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) gives an outstanding performance as the conflicted, stoic heroine while Michael Fassbender brings just the right amount of warmth to his Rochester.
Advertisement: Story continues below

Supporting the leads are Dame Judi Dench as Mrs Fairfax, Sally Hawkins as the despicable Mrs. Reed and Amelia Clarkson, who does a wonderful job as the young head-strong Jane Eyre.

The film is beautifully shot, though it’s recommended you rug up to see this one at the movies. The filmmakers decided to play up the Gothic elements of Bronte’s novel and the blue hues and scenes of driving rain on the stony moors will make you shiver in your seat.

To check session times and purchase tickets head to the MIFF website.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Jul 30, 2011 10:09 pm

http://timeoutchicago.com/arts-culture/movies-on-demand/14870513/critics%E2%80%99-picks

Critics’ picks

The three best bets this week

2. Jane Eyre
Dir. Cary Fukunaga. 2011. PG-13. 115mins. Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench.
When he’s not classing up noisy superhero movies with his tractor-beam intensity, Fassbender is breathing life into oft-adapted literary classics. Is there anything the guy can’t do? Available on demand widely Tue 2.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun Jul 31, 2011 10:01 pm

http://fantastic7voyage.blogspot.com/2011/07/jane-eyre-2011-film-review.html

neděle, 31. července 2011
Jane Eyre, The 2011 Film "Review"

I haven't read Jane Eyre, I haven't seen any film or TV adaptation but I have listened to a radio adaptation when I was a child. It scarred me for life. I found the story dark and humourless, basically everything Jane Austen's books aren't. I don't remember much more from that radio play, but I can still see the images my mind has created to accompany it. I see an insane woman stuck in a room, I see the horror of the burned down house and I see Jane & blind Edward reuniting under a tree.
If Michael Fassbender weren't in this film I simply wouldn't have gone see it. The reason I did go to the cinema to watch this film was this actor I recently discovered in the X-Men prequel and because it was the sort of film my mum would probably like to see (she's into all kinds of "romantic s$#!" unlike me) & therefore a chance for me to take her out a bit. Mia Wasikowska seemed like a good choice to play Jane and reviews of the film were generally good so I gave the film a chance.
This film is literally dark. This time, being a grown woman (almost 5 years older than the heroine of the story) I didn't feel as upset by the story, I didn't find it that dark, but the visuals of the film are what makes it a very gloomy affair. But it also makes the film a work of art, gives it an authenticity and also manages to make you pay close attention. There's not too much dialog. You have to read between the lines and take a good look at the faces illuminated by candlelight.
I have to confess I felt the ending was a bit abrupt, but more because I had a weird feeling the novel went on for a bit longer (it did) than because I'd feel that it didn't fit the style of the adaptation well. Not at all, in the context of the narration this film followed it was the best possible ending.
Mia Wasikowska is simply amazing as Jane. Michael Fassbender makes one sexy Rochester. Some say they are too pretty as neither of the characters are described as attractive in the novel. Well I for one don't complain.
Judi Dench is a glimmer of light in this otherwise dark dark affair. I love her. I wonder if she ever gave a not great performance...
Recognizing the two sisters of St. John as Lucrezia Borgia and Catherine Howard made me realize what a history buff/TV junkie I am. Jamie Bell seemed like an adequate St. John to me. Apparently he's supposed to be tall, blond w/ ancient Greek/Roman features accroding to the novel. Well poor Jamie Bell definitely doesn't fit that description but his acting was fine. Reading about what St. John is supposed to look immediately made me think of my other recent Marvel discovery: Tom Hiddleston. He seems to have quite a few fans in common w/ Michael Fassbender which would make this film adaptation of Jane Eyre a droolfest. I suppose it's better that he is not in this film, after all. Surprised)
I love the way this film was made and I loved the acting. The story brings a strong female character set in a time and place these were pretty rare. Still I can't rate this film w/ a 5/5 or 10/10. It's not my reason's rating, it's my heart's and my heart just is not in this story. Just like it isn't in the story of Wuthering Heights.
My heart can by found resting on a Penguin copy of Persuasion, written by Jane Austen. That dead wretch is clutching it in her hands and won't let go.
If by any chance Cary Fukunaga ever decides to adapt this novel, I'd trust he'll do a great job with it, just like he did with Jane Eyre.

85%

P.S. Even I, not just my mother w/ her love for long haired beardy men, have to admit Michael Fassbender looks mighty fine in long hair and a bit of beard.
Vystavil Maj v 13:13
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun Jul 31, 2011 11:00 pm

http://movie-gazette.com/20447/jane-eyre

Jane Eyre (2011)

Starring:

Amelia Clarkson

Craig Roberts

Eglantine Rembauville-Nicolle

Emily Haigh

Freya Parks

Freya Wilson

Harry Lloyd

Holliday Grainger

Imogen Poots

Jamie BellJamie Bell

Jayne Wisener

Judi DenchJudi Dench

Lizzie Hopley

Mia Wasikowska

Michael Fassbender

Sally Hawkins

Simon McBurney

Sophie Ward

Directed by:

Cary Fukunaga

Rating: 8/10

Running Time: 120 minutes

US Certificate: PG-13 UK Certificate: 12A

Country: United Kingdom, United States

Jane Eyre has had endless appeal over the years thanks to a mixture of Christian values, gothic horror, and even eroticism and comedy, and to get all these aspects in the right proportions in a movie adaptation is a difficult task. Thankfully, Cary Fukunaga has done a good job as she keeps it on the right track between the faithfully stiff middle class virtues of much of the book and a lively, fresh tone and picking and choosing the best parts of the story to tell.

The latest adaptation of Jane Eyre opens with the heroine running across a stormy landscape away from Thornfield Hall as if pursued by something terrifying. She is found and nursed back to health by a young clergyman St. John Rivers (Bell) and his sisters (Grainger and Merchant) and her life of abuse but remarkable personal development then unfolds in a series of flashbacks.

Mia Wasikowska is excellent as the portraying the tight-lipped, plain Jane and the older woman with equally good conviction as she matures. Michael Fassbender adds yet another charismatic performance to a growing list and shows once again that he can do posh very well, and the other peripheral actors, including Judi Dench and Jamie Bell, also chip in admirably. The cinematography needs a special mention as Fukunaga has shown an eye for making the usually unremarkable misty moors into an atmospheric delight.

It's Got: Impressive acting by the two leads, an atmospheric setting with good cinematography, the classic story in its entirety

It Needs: To be seen as one of the best adaptations of the novel

Alternatives:
Dorian Gray, Pride & Prejudice, The Wolfman
Summary

This is not for everyone but is a masterful retelling of a classic novel that offers a new take without abandoning the tone and themes of the book.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun Jul 31, 2011 11:22 pm

http://www.praguepost.com/night-and-day/cinema/9583-jane-eyre.html

Jane Eyre
Latest adaptation is as no-nonsense as its heroine

Posted: July 27, 2011

By Will Noble - Staff Writer

Fresh Eyre. Mia Wasikowska takes a stroll over the Yorkshire Moors as the plucky Jane.

On its publication in 1847, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre was something of a radical text. Its protagonist was a fiery, self-sufficient yet morally intact female who prompted one critic at the time to denounce the work as "one of the coarsest books which we ever perused." For a heroine considered so audacious, Cary Fukunaga's take on the English classic could do with a bit more bite.

Though Fukunaga has rearranged the narrative - rather than beginning with her childhood, the film opens with Jane (Mia Wasikowska) fleeing over the Yorkshire Moors and collapsing outside the house of clergyman St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) - Jane Eyre employs few gimmicks. Bronte's novel is depicted with the conservatism of someone who's afraid to fiddle too much with the original. Rather than being governed by overstylized cinematography, then, it is characters alone that drive the narrative.

Jane certainly has a lot to say for herself; indeed, she is considered to have been at the vanguard of feminism. A harsh upbringing by her callous Aunt Reed (the formidable Sally Hawkins) leads to her first act of defiance, as she stuns the guardian with: "People think you are good, but you are hard-hearted." A subsequent stint at the grim Lowood charity school, where Jane is constantly threatened with the awaiting depths of hell, makes her sturdier stuff still.

But it's on arrival at Thornfield Hall to start work as a governess that Jane really comes into her own (at this juncture, child actor Amelia Clarkson is succeeded by Wasikowska), encountering as she does handsome, brooding owner Edward Fairfax Rochester (Michael Fassbender). Her refusal to be deferential to Rochester ironically renders Jane more attractive to him, and the ensuing relationship has them ricocheting insults across the drawing room with flirtatious venom.
Jane Eyre
***
Directed by Cary Fukunaga
With Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell and Judi Dench

A mutton-chopped Fassbender plays the tortured master well; his gibes at Jane's upbringing and "story of woe" are those of a lonely man who's been stung by love before and isn't ready to accept that a subordinate is worthy of him. Wasikowska is the perfect foil - she gives Jane sass alright, but never flaunts herself sexually, neither does she act the demure flower. Any moments of weakness from Jane (her jealousy at Rochester's flirting with Blanch Ingram) are soon counteracted with attitude, such as her refusal to take extra money for her duties. Both actors understand the unorthodox relationship, and together, they're enticing to watch.

By the bye, Judi Dench's friendly housekeeper, Mrs Fairfax, though used sparingly, is unsurprisingly a highlight, with Dench's Yorkshire heritage ensuring the accent is impeccable.

Jane Eyre's cast does more than enough to command attention for the span of the film, but one can't help feeling the composition is a little too straightforward. Some big-screen magic is missing.

One strand that's definitely undercooked is Jane Eyre's horror element: bedrooms mysteriously set ablaze and house visitors being stabbed as they sleep. Though this is all covered, it's not pronounced enough and therefore not horrific enough. Here is a rare case of a movie that could actually do with more melodrama: orchestral blasts, punch-drunk camera angles, the occasional demonic screech.

When the truth behind the strange goings-on is eventually uncovered, it's with a whimper, not a bang. Such a revelation should send a shiver down your spine (and preferably up again), but it doesn't. This subsequently undermines Jane's running away, which is arguably the most important decision she makes.

As a story in its own right, Jane Eyre remains in vibrant health. Though its rebellious lead doesn't sparkle quite so uniquely anymore, Jane is still a vividly alluring character, which Wasikowska realizes to stunning effect. Fukunaga's no-nonsense approach doesn't mar Bronte's novel per se, but neither does it add anything innovative of its own. It lacks the "wow" factor that would place it in the league of great literary adaptations like Lean's Great Expectations and Hitchcock's Rebecca.

Ultimately, there's nothing to argue that Jane Eyre couldn't have functioned just as well as a solid TV adaptation.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:43 am

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/aug2011/sff5-a01.shtml

Sydney Film Festival—Part 5: A classic novel intelligently reworked, a light comedy and some less impressive efforts
By Richard Phillips
1 August 2011

This is the fifth in a series of articles on the recent Sydney Film Festival. [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4]

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855) is probably the most filmed English novel in the history of the cinema. The first version, which was produced in 1910, was followed by four other silent productions between 1914 and 1915. The book has been filmed 27 times, including nine television series, in the past 100 years. The sheer volume of versions—one on average every five years—is an obvious testament to the timeless artistic depth and social power of the original.

Jane Eyre

The latest production, directed by Cary Fukunaga and starring Mia Wasikowska (Jane), Michael Fassbender (Edward Rochester) and Judi Dench (Mrs Fairfax), is a restrained and largely successful effort and one that will hopefully turn a new generation to Brontë’s original, and other classic works by her talented sisters, Emily (1818-1848) and Anne (1820-1849).

Writing in 1854, Karl Marx stated that Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, William Makepeace Thackeray and Charles Dickens were a “splendid brotherhood of fiction writers in England, whose graphic and eloquent pages have issued to the world more political and social truths than have been uttered by all the professional politicians, publicists and moralists put together.”

Jane Eyre’s story, of course, is well known. Orphaned after her parents died from typhus, she lives at her well-to-do uncle’s home but is unloved. Her aunt and her children treat her callously and she is sent away to the Lowood charity school, where the cruelty continues. “We shall root out the wickedness from this small, ungrateful plant,” declares the pious clergyman running the institution as he punishes Jane for a trivial offence. She develops a loving friendship with Helen Burns, who later dies of consumption at the school.

Jane becomes a governess and gets a job at Thornfield Hall, the mysterious residence of wealthy landowner Edward Rochester. A brooding and somewhat intimidating figure, Rochester is intrigued by the intelligent and fiercely independent young woman. Rochester and Jane develop a complex relationship and eventually fall in love but the story takes a number of dark turns and sees Jane leave.

Fukunaga’s feature begins with a distraught Jane leaving Thornfield Hall and heading onto the moors. She is given shelter at the home of St. John Rivers, a local cleric, and his sisters, and later gets a job as a teacher. The film then unfolds in flashback form and concludes with Rochester and Jane reunited and then married.

While the latest version has some weaknesses—there is a certain rigidness in Jane and Rochester’s relationship—the performances by Wasikowska and Fassbender are generally good and well-supported by Judi Dench. The two-hour feature is beautifully photographed and it is refreshing to see a ‘young’ Jane. Mia Wasikowska was 19 when the film was shot, roughly the same age as Jane when she first meets Rochester.

Brontë’s novel is an exceptional piece of literature. Written during the mid-1840s when mass strikes and protests by the Chartist movement shook the British political establishment, the story is filled with biting social commentary and contempt for the hypocrisy of organised religion and for social conventions that poison healthy human relations. It evinces a deep concern for the poor and is underpinned by a self-confidence and determination that society must change.

Elements of Jane Eyre are directly drawn from Brontë’s own experiences and the conditions of life where her family lived in Haworth on the Yorkshire moors. Charlotte Brontë, like Jane, became a governess and was intimately familiar with all that it entailed. Like Helen Burns, Jane’s Lowood charity school friend, Brontë’s sisters, Elizabeth and Maria, died of tuberculosis at an early age because of the poverty and unhealthy conditions at their school. Emily and Anne both died young—30 and 29 respectively.

Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre marks a sharp change in subject matter compared to his 2009 first feature, Sin Nombre (see review). It will be interesting to see the results of his next project, No Blood, No Guts, No Glory, which is set during the American Civil War, and about a commando unit of Union soldiers who hijack a train in Georgia.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 08, 2011 1:50 pm

http://www.melbourneweekly.com.au/news/local/news/entertainment/review-jane-eyre/2251161.aspx

Review: Jane Eyre
BY ROSE CAPP
08 Aug, 2011 09:45 AM
JANE EYRE (M)

When: Now showing

Where: General release

Tackling Jane Eyre on the big screen would presumably be a daunting task. A much-loved literary classic, cinematic takes on Charlotte Bronte’s dramatic tale date almost as far back as the history of cinema itself. Several short versions were made in 1914, and succeeded by many others including Robert Stevenson’s acclaimed 1943 film starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine, and countless TV movie and mini-series adaptations.

Despite this intimidating filmography, American director Cary Fukunaga and British writer Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) have produced a satisfyingly modern take on Bronte’s brooding romance. Impeccably cast with Australian Mia Wasikowska as the eponymous heroine and German actor du jour Michael Fassbender as Mr Rochester, Fukunaga directs the well-known story of love found, lost and regained with considerable sensitivity.

In many ways the narrative presents a difficult cinematic proposition, with the detailed story divided into three distinct sections which each warrant lengthy exposition. But Fukunaga’s version never feels truncated and Wasikowska’s restrained but potent presence in virtually every scene anchors the story.

While he has the services of cinematographer Adriano Goldman (who also worked on Fukunaga’s Sin Nombre), the director’s own background as a cinematographer clearly informs the film’s distinctive visual style. The use of natural light, muted colours, unadorned faces – and the atmospheric exploitation of the Derbyshire countryside that inspired Bronte’s original novel – all contribute to Jane Eyre’s powerful visual appeal.

Wasikowska is pitch-perfect as Jane while Fassbender smoulders in suitable fashion as the terminally troubled Rochester. And with the likes of Judi Dench (Mrs Fairfax), Sally Hawkins (Mrs Reed) and Jamie Bell

(St. John Rivers) in the supporting cast, this is an impressive contemporary contribution to the big-screen Bronte canon.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:06 pm

http://www.limelightmagazine.com.au/Review/265869,jane-eyre-mia-wasikowska-michael-fassbender-judi-dench.aspx

Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench)
By Lynden Barber on Aug 4, 2011 (4 days ago)
Breath of fresh Eyre: a fine example of literary adaptation.

How to make Jane Eyre fresh again? Charlotte Bronte’s 1847 classic is one of the best-loved English novels, thanks in part to countless TV adaptations and films, most notably in 1943 with Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles. That’s not even counting the subsequent novels (and their film adaptations) it has wholly or partly inspired, from authors such as Daphne du Maurier, Iris Murdoch and Jean Rhys.

One way forward might be through inspired casting, a second through screenwriting that recognises the needs of film above the desire to represent the story in a more literal fashion (the latter being something the TV mini-series will always be able to do more easily because of its greater duration).

To its advantage this compelling new version, directed by relatively little known American Cary Fukunaga and scripted by English dramatist Moira Buffini, recognizes both of these imperatives. The moorland setting is beautifully bleak, the cinematography splendid, and the screenplay pitches straight in without plodding through all of the book’s first part. As the self-possessed governess Jane, Mia Wasikowska is perfection – relatively plain, the right age (early 20s) and charismatic, while Michael Fassbender’s Mr Rochester is all glowering vigour. Pure pleasure.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:45 pm

http://www.thereelbits.com/2011/08/07/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre
By Richard Gray · August 7, 2011 · No comments
All, Film Reviews · Tagged: 2011, 20110811, Cary Fukunaga, Charlotte Brontë, drama, Jane Eyre, Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Universal
Jane Eyre (2011) - Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska (Universal)

Jane Eyre posterRising star Mia Wasikowska seemingly came out of nowhere when she emerged fully-formed in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland last year. Yet the Australian actress had already paid her dues on local TV’s All Saints, before gaining roles in the films Suburban Mayhem and Rogue. Although seemingly ideally cast in costume dramas, she has been eclectically cast as a forest wife in Defiance, the daughter of a lesbian couple in Lisa Cholodenko’s indie comedy The Kids Are All Right and That Evening Sun opposite Hal Holbrook. Yet it is to the umpteenth adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre that Wasikowska returns for her latest starring role.

After being emotionally abused by her aunt and cousins in her ancestral home at Gateshead, a young Jane Eyre (Amelia Clarkson, The Sarah Jane Adventures) is treated as a servant, despite her uncle’s dying wishes. Sent to a charity school, she suffers further torment at the hands of a vindictive school system. After eight years, the adult Jane (Wasikowska) leaves the school and advertises herself as a governess, where she meets the dashing Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender, X-Men: First Class). Falling for him, despite his impending marriage, Rochester’s feelings for Jane grow – but the course of true love was never meant to run straight.

With at least a score of film adaptations already gracing the silver screen, and half as many again produced for television, it was doubtful from the beginning as to whether director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) could bring anything original to the tale. Stripping much of the gothic horror from the novel, including most of the wonderful Red Room sequence or any vision of her dead uncle, this abbreviated version of the Brontë saga relies heavily on the casting of the two leads. Wasikowska has grown quite adept at looking pale and outraged at societal norms, a virtual transplant of her Alice in Wonderland role and Michael Fassbender is quickly being groomed as the new Colin Firth (with this being his Mr. Darcy role). His capable performance as Rochester may make a certain demographic within the audience collectively heave their bosoms and swoon with delight, and the resulting light-headedness that results from being Fassbendered may cause one to overlook the otherwise flat and lifeless interpretation of a classic novel. This is not to diminish either performance, for they are both noteworthy, but screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) doesn’t extend the story beyond the superficial.

Co-produced by BBC Films, Jane Eyre does little to distinguish itself from previous televised efforts, and Adriano Goldman’s (Conviction) unspectacular photography betrays his TV origins with a look that does not demand the large format screen. Even the presence of Judi Dench, and the seemingly ubiquitous Sally Hawkins, serves to remind us of how good costume drama can be when it hits closer to the mark than this sub-par effort. While new adaptations of the classic novels is inevitable every few years, a new take is demanded on them to ensure their vitality for the ages, especially for cinema audiences. Parody mashups such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies or Android Karenina may aim to lampoon the source novels, but they manage to remain faithful to the source while providing a fresh examination of their core themes. There may be another great adaptation of the classic Brontë novel to come, but this isn’t it.
The Reel Bits
A flat and often unemotional retelling of a well-worn story, with a summary version of the tale that is often lifeless, unintentionally funny and tedious at best.

Jane Eyre is released in Australia on 11 August 2011 from Universal.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:49 pm

http://moviecitynews.com/2011/08/wilmington-on-dvds-the-rest-jane-eyre-the-perfect-game-the-goods-coming-to-americatrading-places-the-dirty-harry-collection/

By Mike Wilmington Wilmington@moviecitynews.com
Posted Thursday, August 4th, 2011 -

Wilmington on DVDs. The Rest. Jane Eyre, The Perfect Game, The Goods, Coming to America/Trading Places, The Dirty Harry Collection

“Jane Eyre” Three Stars.
U.K.-U.S.: Cary Fukunaga, 2011 (Universal)
In college, as an English major, roaming happily among the great green fields of the literary Gods, I made some questionable choices. For example, I tended to ignore the more successful and popular Bronte sister (in her day), hard-working Charlotte, of Jane Eyre, in favor of Wild Emily, author of that sacred, romantic text of so many lovers of 19th century British novels, Wuthering Heights. I adored Emily, but Charlotte deserved better of me.

Jane Eyre was almost as famous as Wuthering Heights, and revered too (if not quite as much). And, important for a lovie-lover, it has been filmed almost as often as Emily’s stormy tale — which boasts in its filmography, the classic 1939 William Wyler-Ben Hecht-Charles MacArthur Wuthering Heights with Laurence Olivier as Heathcliff and Merle Oberon as Cathy (if only Cathy had been Vivien Leigh), and a 1953 Mexican adaptation by Luis Bunuel called Abismos de Pasion. Most notable of the screen Eyres, of course, is the classy 1944 film, with Joan Fontaine as Jane, and Orson Welles, brooding his best, as Rochester — and the beautiful 12 year old Elizabeth Taylor as the little girl who dies at school. Some say Welles may have “helped” Robert Stevenson — a descendant of Robert Louis Stevenson, and the man who later made Mary Poppins for Disney — with the direction. Maybe.

The story is a classic one, a model for dozens of Gothic-influenced novels about threatened ladies, teachers, guests, young wives or whatever, come to huge mysterious houses — stories of which the most famous is Daphne du Maurier‘s Rebecca, in which Joan Fontaine played Olivier’s nameless young wife for Alfred Hitchcock, four years before her Jane Eyre. In the plot that would become a paradigm, Jane, badly treated at her nasty aunt’s (Sally Hawkins) house, goes to boarding school, suffers there and eventually becomes a governess to the children of Mr. Edward Rochester, a strange man with a strange unspoken history — and a secret that will burst explosively into the light at the least appropriate moment. The novel “Jane Eyre” is an romance, but one with a heroine with brains: a novel that treasures feeling and intellect a bit more than beauty.

Now comes this new British adaptation by director Cary Fukunaga (who made the fine immigration drama, Sin Nombre) and scenarist Moira Buffni, with Mia Wasikowska (Alice) as Jane and Michael Fassbender (Hunger) as Rochester. Of course, that throws Bronte’s main idea out the window, since Charlotte wanted to write a romantic novel about lovers who were physically plain (Jane) or unattractive (Rochester), and Wasikowska and Fassbender are a couple of knockouts. So too, of course, were Joan Fontaine and — in his younger , slimmer days — Orson Welles. And so have been most of the actors and actresses who’ve played the parts.

It’s in many ways, a faithful movie, one that at least respects its source. But how can you really sympathize in the ways Charlotte wanted us to sympathize with Jane — to admire not her looks, but her brains, her pluck, her persistence, her bravery — when she’s played by a stunner like Wasikowksa, however disguised, however made “mousey?” Poetic license, I guess.


The whole film in fact has that Gothic, stylish beauty that many British versions of the 19th century classics strive for. Irony of ironies, the story of Jane is there, in all its almost Dickensian travail. (Charlotte though was an admirer more of ironic William Thackeray.) And the whole mood and style of Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre reminds you of the feverish romantic furies of Emily’s Wuthering Heights, of love in a windstorm, love beyond death, love that hurls you into a torrent.

It’s a good movie though. Sometimes it almost hypnotizes you with all that windy romance. And, of course, another adaptation of any Bronte sister at all, even of the usually ignored Anne (“The Tenant of Wildfell Hall“) is always welcome by me. We need all the good, and great, writing in movies that we can get.

avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:51 pm

http://canadiancinephile.com/2011/08/04/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Posted on August 4, 2011 by Jordan Richardson

Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre is a moody, well-acted, lean motion picture adaptation of the classic novel. Charlotte Brontë’s novel has been made into a movie a number of times, starting way back in the silent era. The most recent version came in 1996 with Franco Zeffirelli’s version, a picture that starred William Hurt, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Elle Macpherson. Yes, that Elle Macpherson.

It makes sense that Jane Eyre would be popular stuff, as it is one of the finer examples of Gothic fiction. With the sort of flawed titular character that makes for interesting exploration, slices of social criticism and the necessary tale of a child coming into her own in rough circumstances, the novel was almost destined to be cinematic from the outset. So what does Fukunaga’s version add (or subtract) from the annals of Jane Eyre?

For starters, it boasts a hell of a star in the wondrous Mia Wasikowska. Employed by Edward Fairfax Rochester (Michael Fassbender) to take care of Adele (Romy Settbon Moore), she is in need of affection and love from the get-go. Yet the isolation and routine of existence under the perplexing thumb of Rochester isn’t the most ideal existence, even given the past tumult Jane went through on her way to where we find her.

What Fukunaga nails down immediately is the atmosphere. We’re given Jane running in the middle of nowhere and right away we can sense that this is going to be a bleak project. Wasikowska is perfect when it comes to drawing that sensibility out, as she can say so much with a slight expression or a coldly delivered line. She also plays immensely well off the other actors, especially the incomparable Judi Dench.

A lot of these period pieces can sink into boring territory pretty quickly, with more focus on the pageantry and finery that on the human elements. In this case, however, Fukunaga’s vision reflects the mood within the character. The bleakness comes from an inevitable source, something the flashback sequences illuminate.

At the core of the Jane Eyre novel is a sense of repression, but there is also a strong thread of femininity. The titular character is strong-willed and is able to see her way out of her predicament without the aid of a man, something rare for the time of its writing and even for the time of this flick. Fukunaga gives us this element in showing us Jane’s self-reliance, even in times where she feels like she’s meandering aimlessly, and her passion.

The sets, lighting, costumes, and so on are all up to par, as they usually are in modern period pieces. With the elements, Fukunaga offers some modernity in subtle ways. Camera angles are decidedly hip, for instance, and a dash of the ol’ shaky-cam puts in a sense of motion for the opening scenes. Every bit looks as it should.

So Jane Eyre is above the standard of most modern period pieces. It isn’t boring or slow; it produces winning performances from Wasikowska, Fassbender and Dench. It is a fine rendering of a fine book, an adaptation that adds tone and muscle to a tale that many know by heart.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Tue Aug 09, 2011 12:23 am

http://www.familyvideo.com/entertainment-news/article/800570779/jane-eyre-a-compelling-take-on-a-classic-novel

'Jane Eyre' a compelling take on a classic novel
Published: 8/8/2011 6:15 PM

Classic novels have often made for some of the best movies. After all, with such great stories it's no surprise that it would translate to film so well. The 2011 drama "Jane Eyre" was another hit, turning the Charlotte Bronte novel into a compelling movie. The new release DVD hits shelves August 16.

The titular Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska) has never had much of anything. After being shipped off to a boarding school by her aunt, she graduates and finds work as the governess of a young girl. The girl warms up to Jane, but she isn't the only one. The master of the house, Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender) also takes a liking to his new employee.

As the duo's relationship blossoms, Jane appears to be happy for the first time in a long while. But there is a dark secret from her past that may come to light and doom her happiness once and for all.

Anybody looking to check out some excellent adaptations of famous novels may want to watch the Coen brothers hit "True Grit" or "Jurassic Park."
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Tue Aug 09, 2011 12:24 am

http://www.whatsplaying.com.au/2011/08/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

By Brian Orndorf | August 9, 2011

Our Rating:
Release Date: August 11, 2011
Details: 115 mins, M, Romance
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins
Directed By: Cary Joji Fukunaga

Charlotte Bronte’s immortal tale of love and separation has seen its fair share of adaptations over the last century of filmed entertainment. Regurgitated time and again for both television and the big screen, Jane Eyre has been bled dry, with filmmakers of diverse backgrounds hungry to make their mark on a most celebrated story. Now, director Cary Joji Fukunaga steps up to courageously guide another look at the novel, unearthing something that’s eluded many filmmakers throughout the years: A fresh approach.

Orphaned, abused, and disregarded by her elders, Jane Eyre (Amelia Clarkson as a child, Mia Wasikowska as an adult) has endured a frightening life of hardship, finding her sense of individuality stifled as she attempts to shape some type of existence for herself. Taking a job as a governess for the estate of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender), Jane is quickly challenged by the irritable man, who clearly seems enlivened by the presence of this educated young woman. As their relationship grows, a turbulent sense of love develops between the pair, with Jane willing to give herself to Rochester, only to find secrets from his past coming back to ruin him. Also challenging Jane is an interlude with Rivers (Jamie Bell), a clergyman who takes the frazzled woman in during a time of need, only to find himself disarmed by her extraordinary aura.

Jane Eyre has traveled quite a distance since its initial 1847 publishing, leaving an impressive string of interpretations in its wake, most centered on the primal needs of the period romance, with Jane and Rochester a prime pair of restricted lovers. This latest exploration of Bronte’s work (elegantly adapted by Moira Buffini, Tamara Drewe) takes a decidedly sophisticated approach to the central love story, making the pairing of Jane and Rochester something enigmatic, uncomfortable, and taboo. Fukunaga transforms the story into a mystery of sorts, rearranging the events of the book to better pierce into the protagonist’s spinning headspace, flawlessly capturing the internal spasms of a lady on the run from her past, fighting for the freedom she craves, trapped in a severe society that doesn’t permit such luxuries. It’s an unusual take on the material, but an enormously successful artistic choice, with legitimate suspense flooded back into the story, handled with tremendous care by the director, last seen guiding 2009’s masterful drama, Sin Nombre.

The picture isn’t a classical romance in the least, with delicate candlelit cinematography on the hunt for claustrophobia and confusion, keeping the film in a state of suspicion, greatly enhanced by the skillful performances. Fassbender’s Rochester is special curiosity, crafted into an antagonistic personality who is visibly charged by Jane’s arrival. He pokes and prods, looking for an intellectual challenge in a sea of obedient employees (including Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax), finding Jane to be a remarkable development that flushes away his escalating distaste for life on his vast estate. Fassbender is itchy and vulnerable as the character, avoiding overt red beams of swoon to play a profoundly private churn of attraction. Wasikowska is equally as masterful, articulating the burden of Jane’s life with glances and tremors, communicating a volcanic disappointment with the smallest of movements. It’s an exceptional performance, portioned heroically by Fukunaga, keeping the pair in a harsh standoff position until the ice is ready to thaw. The courtship contains unexpected elements of frustration, making the paring more about unleashing raw passion than gloved-hand worship from afar.

Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre is a fantastically compelling, spellbindingly photographed motion picture, soaking up the bitterness and regret that defines the emotional ooze of the story, while twisting around ridiculously known elements to expose darker, substantial moments of seduction. There’s little sunshine allowed here, with the feature finding fertile dramatic ground in pained expressions and gut-rot frustration; however, in Fukunaga’s capable hands, there’s undeniable beauty in all the misery and turmoil.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:52 pm

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/mia-wasikowska-illuminates-the-never-ending-story-of-jane-eyre/story-e6frg8n6-1226112353071

Mia Wasikowska illuminates the never-ending story of Jane Eyre

David Stratton
From: The Australian
August 13, 2011 12:00AM

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska

Jane Eyre is in first-class hands with the performances of Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska. Source: Supplied

Jane Eyre (M)
4 stars
National release

A VIRGINAL heroine in thrall to a powerful and threatening older man has been the stuff of melodrama for hundreds of years.

Even today's teenagers lap up its latest incarnation in the Twilight series. Charlotte Bronte's seminal gothic novel on which Jane Eyre is based was published in 1847 and never lost its power.

Filmmakers were attracted to the book from the beginning of cinema: the first known film version was made in 1910, one of two produced that year, and at least four more versions were released in the silent era. You could be cynical and note that, because the book was out of copyright, no fees had to be paid to adapt it.

The most celebrated version until now has been the 1943 production that starred Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles, but there was also the 1996 Franco Zeffirelli version with Charlotte Gainsbourg as Jane and William Hurt as Rochester.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.
Related Coverage

Jane Eyre **** Herald Sun, 2 days ago
Mia Wasikowska Herald Sun, 3 days ago
Eyre and graces Perth Now, 4 days ago
A fairly plain Jane in latest adaptation Adelaide Now, 6 days ago
So much more than plain Jane The Australian, 7 days ago

End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

In addition there have been an Indian version of the story (Sangdil, 1952), at least eight television versions and the Australian film Wide Sargasso Sea (John Duigan, 1992) which filled in Rochester's back story. And let's not forget Jacques Tourneur's I Walked with a Zombie, a horror film made the same year as the Fontaine-Welles version, which uses Bronte's basic story (uncredited) in all sorts of interesting ways.

So what can be said about yet another version? Well, to start with, it stars the luminous Canberra-born actress Mia Wasikowska as Jane, and she's quite marvellous.

After making a tremendous impact in her first big role in the Australia film Suburban Mayhem (an underrated gem if ever there was one), Wasikowska, like so many of our talented people, was snapped up by Hollywood and has appeared with distinction in Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids are All Right, Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland and Gus van Sant's upcoming Restless (which premiered this year at Cannes).

As Jane Eyre, a role she was born to play, she radiates solemn intelligence and wide-eyed innocence along with intrinsic pride and idealism.

As Edward Rochester, the mysterious owner of Thornfield Hall, Michael Fassbender is also particularly well cast. His first appearance, seen by Jane on horseback, is a splendid moment that creates exactly the right mood of excitement and danger.

The love affair at the story's centre is in first-class hands. In the book, it must be said, Rochester is depicted as being considerably less attractive, and Jane is literally a plain Jane, something that can't be said for Wasikowska. These concessions aren't unwelcome.

I'm assuming just about everyone knows the story. In this version, adapted by Moira Buffini (who scripted the smart British comedy Tamara Drewe) and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, the story is told non-sequentially, beginning as Jane flees Thornfield into a wild, storm-tossed landscape of beautiful but dangerous moors and eventually seeks shelter in the home of a clergyman, St John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his sisters.

Flashbacks then take us back to Jane's childhood (in these scenes Amelia Clarkson plays the character). Orphaned, she is mistreated by her aunt, Mrs Reed (Sally Hawkins having a break from the eternally sunny character she usually plays), and sent to a charity school where she befriends poor, doomed Helen Burns (Freya Parks).

In her late teens (now played by Wasikowska), Jane is sent to Thornfield as governess to Adele (Romy Settbon Moore), the ward of the usually absent Rochester, and finds a friend in housekeeper Mrs Fairfax (Judi Dench, bringing great substance to the role).

Fukunaga, whose father is Japanese and mother is Swedish, was largely reared in the US. There he directed what is so far his only other film, the well-regarded Sin Nombre, a thriller set in Mexico that sadly hasn't received a commercial release in this country.

He wasn't the most obvious choice to direct this perennial love story but he has done an outstanding job, bringing an outsider's eye to capture details of Britain's class structure in the 19th century and a poet's vision to the beautiful, lowering landscapes.

This is the best adaptation of the novel since the 1943 version.

Jane Eyre (M)
4 stars
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:53 pm

http://www.abc.net.au/atthemovies/txt/s3246798.htm

At the Movies
Wed 10pm ABC1 Sun 7pm ABC2

A mousy governess who softens the heart of her employer soon discovers that he's hiding a terrible secret.

Margaret: three-and-a-half stars David: four stars
Jane Eyre

Rated M

Review by David Stratton

Jane, MIA WASIKOWSKA, flees from Thornfield Hall into a wild, stormy landscape in the north of England. She seeks refuge in the home of a clergyman, St. John Rivers, Jamie Bell, and his two sisters. Flashbacks show that at the age of 10, played by AMELIA CLARKSON, orphaned Jane had been badly treated by her aunt, Mrs. Reed, SALLY HAWKINS, and had been sent from Gateshead, her family home, to Lowood, a charity school; here she meets Helen, FREYA PARKS, and they become friends. Jane comes to Thornfield, the house owned by the mysterious Mr. Rochester, MICHAEL FASSBENDER, as a governess to Rochester's daughter, and is kindly treated by the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax, JUDI DENCH.

Her friendship with Rochester develops slowly.

There have been many film and television versions of Charlotte Bronte's great novel, the most famous being the 1944 adaptation with Joan Fontaine as Jane and Orson Welles as Rochester. That was very impressive, but maybe not as impressive as this excellent new adaptation, which has been scripted by Moira Buffini - who adapted TAMARA DREWE - and directed by Japanese-American Cary Joji Fukunaga. It's not an easy story to bring to the screen within the confines of a two hour feature film, but the filmmakers succeed rather triumphantly.

It looks wonderful, with its vivid location photography of the desolate moors that surround Thornfield, and there are really fine performances from Australian Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender in the leading roles, as well as strong support from a distinguished cast of character actors. Suitably gothic and suspenseful, the film also succeeds as a potent love story.
Further comments

DAVID: Margaret?

MARGARET: Well, I suppose that was a little bit of the disappointment for me because it - I didn't feel the passion, David.

DAVID: Oh, you didn't? Oh, I did. Very much so.

MARGARET: No, I didn't and I found it - and I really wanted to, because it's such a great story.

DAVID: It is.

MARGARET: And I actually think they start with Jane running away from Thornfield and in a way I think that structure is wrong because you need to go to the St John home and not want Jane to be there, because she's fleeing the disappointment of this potential marriage to Rochester and I think to place it beforehand, it takes away the tension of her being there but, anyway.

DAVID: I don't agree because, you see, most film versions leave that out altogether. Film versions leave the whole St John thing out altogether so I liked this structure. So I'm the opposite to you on this one.

MARGARET: Well, we're just going to have to agree to disagree.

DAVID: We are. Not for the first time.

MARGARET: I think the moors look great. I like a lot of the film. I think it does look beautiful. I just wish that there'd been more spark between those two.

DAVID: Oh, there was plenty of spark for me and I was pleased to see Sally Hawkins...

MARGARET: Maybe you appreciate subtlety more than I do.

DAVID: Maybe, and I was pleased to see Sally Hawkins for once being not cheerful.

MARGARET: No, she's quite a witch in this, isn't she? Look, I'm giving this three and a half stars.

DAVID: I'm giving it four.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:54 pm

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/entertainment/a/-/movies/10028575/movie-review-jane-eyre/

Movie Review: Jane Eyre
MARK NAGLAZAS, The West Australian August 12, 2011, 2:00 pm

Jane Eyre (M) 4 stars

Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender

Directed by Cary Fukunaga

You'll like this if you liked The Age of Innocence, The Piano, Portrait of a Lady, Bright Star and, of course, all the other Jane Eyres.

Charlotte Bronte's classic romance has been filmed 18 times since the silent era, most famously in 1943 with Joan Fontaine as the plain-looking but obstinate governess Jane Eyre and Orson Welles as her tormented master, Edward Rochester.

However, none of these versions of Bronte's novel has as much influence on the look and the feel of this latest adaptation from young American director Cary Fukunaga as that of another Jane also hailing from an isolated, windswept part of the world -- New Zealand visionary Jane Campion.

Scene after scene of the new Jane Eyre evokes Campion's romantic Gothic masterpiece The Piano (or, even more closely, her recent Keats biopic Bright Star), with the characters very much a part of the real world rather than thrust into an overheated romantic fantasy.

Fukunaga's exquisite sense of place and the Campionesque delicacy of his approach, paired with Mia Wasikowska's nicely judged performance as Jane, make for a beautifully balanced movie - one perfectly poised between the melodramatic demands of the novel and the need to appeal to more subdued contemporary sensibilities.

And in Campionesque fashion Fukunaga returns Jane to her rightful place in the story, which has been too easily overwhelmed by the towering figure of Rochester, as in the 1943 version, when Welles gave such a gargantuan performance you feared he might gobble up his leading lady along with the roast pig.

In Fukunaga's film the narrative point of view belongs to Jane, whose highly refined, proto-feminist consciousness and powerful sense of self is challenged by her suppressed passion for a man racked by anguish and mystery.

To reinforce the centrality of their heroine, Fukunaga and writer Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) have astutely opened the movie with Jane as the runaway bride, emotionally shattered and adrift on the moors after learning that her husband-to-be is already married.

While Jane is being cared for in the home of the clergyman St John Rivers and his sisters, we're taken back to Jane's childhood and the abuse she suffered at the hands of her cold, cruel aunt, her spirit-building schooldays at prison camp-like Lowood and to her "escape" to Thornfield Hall where she becomes the governess of the ward of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Jane and Edward first meet when she accidentally walks in front of his charging horse and he's thrown to the ground. This sparks one of the most enthralling romances in English literature - between a woman who has clung to a sense of her own self-worth despite between repeatedly reminded of her insignificance and a man shattered by the greed of his family.

Indeed, this very contemporary sense of two damaged souls finding each other, of the weight of psychological injury bearing down on the present, comes through in this version of Jane Eyre, amplified by the focused performances of Wasikowska and Fassbender.

Wasikowska is perhaps prettier than some of the more recent Janes, but she projects a forbidding intensity that clearly separates her from the fashionistas and bimbos Edward normally socialises with and is expected to marry. It is not hard to imagine any man being undone by Wasikowska's "plain Jane".

And while wiry Fassbender doesn't have the barrel-chested Byronic flourish of his predecessors, his every flippant, provocative utterance to Jane reveals a man in a private hell, whose arrogance is a front for a torment that threatens to tear him apart.

Again, the emotional fury forever evoked by the name Jane Eyre is amplified not through melodramatic flourish but a very modern sense of reality, with Fukunaga's camera tracking his heroine almost in a documentary style rather than bathing her in the Gothic shadows of previous versions.
His Jane is a heroine for our own time - a woman prepared to sacrifice everything for love except for her own sense of self.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:58 pm

http://m.thecityweekly.com.au/news/local/news/entertainment/review-jane-eyre/2254562.aspx

Review: Jane Eyre
JANE EYRE (M) When: Now showing Where: General release Tackling Jane Eyre on the big screen would presumably be a daunting task. A much-loved literary classic, cinematic takes on Charlotte Bronte’s dramatic tale date almost as far back as the history of cinema itself. Several short versions were made in 1914, and succeeded by many others including Robert Stevenson’s acclaimed 1943 film starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine, and countless TV movie and mini-series adaptations. Despite this intimidating filmography, American director Cary Fukunaga and British writer Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) have produced a satisfyingly modern take on Bronte’s brooding romance. Impeccably cast with Australian Mia Wasikowska as the eponymous heroine and German actor du jour Michael Fassbender as Mr Rochester, Fukunaga directs the well-known story of love found, lost and regained with considerable sensitivity. In many ways the narrative presents a difficult cinematic proposition, with the detailed story divided into three distinct sections which each warrant lengthy exposition. But Fukunaga’s version never feels truncated and Wasikowska’s restrained but potent presence in virtually every scene anchors the story. While he has the services of cinematographer Adriano Goldman (who also worked on Fukunaga’s Sin Nombre), the director’s own background as a cinematographer clearly informs the film’s distinctive visual style. The use of natural light, muted colours, unadorned faces – and the atmospheric exploitation of the Derbyshire countryside that inspired Bronte’s original novel – all contribute to Jane Eyre’s powerful visual appeal. Wasikowska is pitch-perfect as Jane while Fassbender smoulders in suitable fashion as the terminally troubled Rochester. And with the likes of Judi Dench (Mrs Fairfax), Sally Hawkins (Mrs Reed) and Jamie Bell (St. John Rivers) in the supporting cast, this is an impressive contemporary contribution to the big-screen Bronte canon.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:00 pm

http://www.theherald.com.au/blogs/james-joyce/review-jane-eyre/2255647.aspx

Review: Jane Eyre
JANE EYRE (M)

Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga

Stars: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, Jamie Bell

Screening: Newcastle, Glendale, Hoyts Charlestown, Tuggerah, Erina, Avoca

Rating: ***

LONG before there was Twilight and Team Edward, there was Charlotte Bronte’s gloriously doomy saga of ill-fated romance between a plain but spirited girl and a mysterious hunk tortured by dark demons.

At last count, Bronte’s 1847 novel has been made into a film 18 times since the first in 1910, as well as at least nine television adaptations.

This new one, starring Australia’s Mia Wasikowska (from Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland), is a welcome addition: a handsome heartbreaker, unapologetically melodramatic and with happy-ever-after austerity measures and grandly Gothic heebie-jeebies.

And let’s not forget prim bonnets and corsets for all the ladies and magnificent muttonchops for the blokes.

The film opens, somewhat cryptically, with a young woman in a hooded cloak fleeing a darkened manor house, scrambling across rain-swept countryside to escape an unspecified peril.

She is eventually taken in by a dour young clergyman (Billy Elliot’s Jamie Bell) and nursed back to health by his kindly sisters.

Poor Jane Eyre has quite a tale of woe to tell, which is when the film circles back to the events leading up to that tear-stained flight across the moors.

As the feisty orphan moves from her loveless childhood monstered by an awful aunt, through her cruel days at a severe boarding school to her position as the manor house governess, Jane is revealed to be humble and honest, wise beyond her years and independent in word and deed.

In other words, a quietly sympathetic heroine.

And yet naivety about men and the darker corners of human nature are exposed when she falls for her employer at Thornfield Hall, Edward Fairfax Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Dashing but cynical, wild but wounded, unreachable yet utterly irresistible, Mr Rochester is equally fascinated by the candour and restraint of Jane, whom he calls a ‘‘rare unearthly thing’’.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:01 pm

http://www.theherald.com.au/blogs/james-joyce/review-jane-eyre/2255647.aspx?storypage=2

Review: Jane Eyre

Their first fireside conversation, an exceedingly polite but vigorous verbal joust, is exquisite.

What unfolds thereafter, as Jane opens her heart and has it crushed by the terrible truths lurking in Thornfield’s attic, makes for grandly melancholy melodrama.

Handsomely filmed, elegantly acted and shrewdly re-constructed from the book using flashbacks to weave together the sprawling story, this Jane Eyre savours Bronte’s brooding undercurrent of angst while retaining its essential romantic heart.

Wasikowska makes a perfect Jane, a heroine the author famously described as “plain and small”.

The actress adopts a minimalist approach. Her pale skin, tight-lipped frown, watchful stare and severely parted hair, together with mostly drab outfits, make for muted emotion.

There is simple elegance in her method although, as invigorating as her exchanges with Fassbender are, Wasikowska’s portrayal is in danger of appearing inert at times.

This means the erotic potential of that initial fireside exchange never flames as vividly as you would hope.

Fassbender, the German-born Irish actor last seen levitating submarines in X-Men: First Class, makes a captivating heartbreaker, swinging with ease between menace, vulnerability and melancholy.

Director Cary Joji Fukunaga (in his second feature after the engrossing Sin Nombre) makes the most of marvellous backdrops and settings.

And his interior scenes chill just so, as creaking floorboards and howling wind outside bring the goosebumps.

This Jane Eyre is not a radical re-do or a provocative re-think, rather a well-appointed revival.

Judi Dench is a delight as Thornfield’s salt-of-the-earth housekeeper Mrs Fairfax and Sally Hawkins is superb as Jane’s despicable aunt.

The tender misery and delicate heartache of this Jane Eyre should please lovers of grandly tragic love stories that have no need for vampires and werewolves.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:01 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/jane-eyre-20110811-1iozq.html

Jane Eyre
Jim Schembri
August 11, 2011

Jane Airless
Mia Wasikowska stars as the title character in Jane Eyre.

By the numbers: Mia Wasikowska is plain but pretty in the stuffy Jane Eyre.

Reviewer rating:

Rating: 20 out of 5 stars

The latest Jane Eyre adaptation is largely lifeless, writes JIM SCHEMBRI

JANE EYRE

(120 min) M


Regrettably, the latest in the never-ending quest for the perfect screen adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's signature classic - it's been remade more than Pride and Prejudice - is a stilted, dry, unimaginative affair designed purely to please fans but not to win over any new ones. Mia Wasikowska is the emotionally stunted heroine who must overcome the strictures of her time and assert her right to freedom from conventions that would prefer she remain socially and morally inert. As far as polite, undemanding, unadventurous, slavishly faithful book-to-film enterprises go, this Jane Eyre is hard to fault: the scenery is pretty; the costumes are pretty; Michael Fassbender (as Rochester) is pretty; even Wasikowska is pretty, though she's supposed to be a plain-looking proto-feminist. But the direction by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) is real by-the-numbers rote; there's scant spark to the performances or the cinematography, leaving very little to engage those who haven't already decided to love the movie before going in. Select.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:02 pm

http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/movies/film-review-jane-eyre/story-e6frfmw0-1226112907405

Film review: Jane Eyre

Leigh Paatsch
From: National Features
August 11, 2011 12:00AM

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre. Picture: Supplied

SINCE the dawn of cinema, there have been 18 feature-length adaptations of Charlotte Bronte's classic 1847 novel Jane Eyre.

Throw in the many times television has had its way and the figure blows out to 30.

Therefore any newcomers daring to wander across Bronte's fabled misty moors of malcontent had better be on their game.

Chances are most viewers have been here, seen that, and are not about to be so easily impressed.

Such standoffishness will last all of one minute once eyes are clapped on Mia Wasikowska in the title role.

This gifted Australian actress takes an imposing, time-honoured part and makes it her very own with both sheer presence and a carefully controlled force of will.

The film chooses an unusual entry point into its familiar plot: Jane's traumatic leaving of Thornfield Hall, the sprawling country estate where she has worked as a governess since surviving a cruel and emotionally barren childhood.

Exhausted and distraught to the brink of total collapse, Jane lands on the doorstep of a trainee pastor named St John Rivers (Jamie Bell).

Together with his sisters, Rivers nurses his bedraggled house guest back to health, and gradually presses for the reasons surrounding her mysterious arrival.

Politely, but firmly, Miss Eyre cuts short all lines of questioning. Nevertheless, answers are still forthcoming: piece by piece, a jigsaw of flashbacks begins to take shape.

We see Jane as an orphan child, banished from what is left of the family fold by a spiteful aunt (Sally Hawkins).

We see Jane holding firm to her values throughout her education at a boarding school best likened to a religious prison, despite being pronounced as worthless on a daily basis.

Then comes her fateful tenure at Thornfield Hall, where Jane's first taste of freedom is tainted by her relationship with the master of the manor, Mr Rochester (Michael Fassbender). Older, worldlier, but perhaps not wiser than his new 18-year-old employee, the remote and inscrutable Rochester does not know what to make of Jane.

But he is intrigued.

As for Jane, fiercely independent yet achingly vulnerable, life at Thornfield becomes a minefield of untapped emotions. With each step, she is enamoured of and intimidated and infuriated by Rochester.

Both characters have their defences ramped up, and their true feelings tamped down.

Both also have their secrets which, should they be revealed, may drive them apart forevermore.

Director Cary Fukunara and screenwriter Moira Buffini have very skilfully truncated Bronte's hefty novel without losing any of its essential force.

The shifting ground beneath Jane and Rochester's rocky relationship is expertly handled by Wasikowska and Fassbender, who click on levels beyond those found in regulation costume drama.

Like its implacable heroine, this impeccable version of Jane Eyre will not rest until certain truths are dispensed, certain lies are dismissed, and certainty as a whole is achieved.



VISIT j.mp/janeeyre2011

Jane Eyre (M)
Director: Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre)
Starring: Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender (above), Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins, Judi Dench.
4 stars
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 13, 2011 5:27 pm

http://www.lianhuad.info/mia-wasikowska-illuminates-the-never-ending-story-janeeyre-by/

Written by admin on August 13, 2011

A VIRGINAL in thrall to a powerful and threatening older man has been the stuff of melodrama for hundreds of years.

Mia Wasikowska illuminates the never-ending story ?janeeyre by,Even todays teenagers lap up its latest incarnation in the Twilight series. Charlotte Brontes seminal gothic novel on which Jane Eyre is based was published in 1847 and never lost its power.

Filmmakers were attracted to the book from the beginning of cinema: the first known film version was made in 1910, one of two produced that year, and at least four more versions were released in the silent era. You could be cynical and note that, because the book was out of copyright, no fees had to be paid to adapt it.

The most celebrated version until now has been the 1943 production that starred Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles, but there was also the 1996 Franco Zeffirelli version with Charlotte Gainsbourg as Jane and William Hurt as Rochester.

In addition there have been an Indian version of the story (Sangdil, 1952), at least eight television versions and the Australian film Wide Sargasso Sea (John Duigan, 1992) which filled in Rochesters back story. And lets not forget Jacques Tourneurs I Walked with a Zombie, a horror film made the same year as the Fontaine-Welles version, which uses Brontes basic story (uncredited) in all sorts of interesting ways.

So what can be said about yet another version? Well, to start with, it stars the luminous Canberra-born actress Mia Wasikowska as Jane, and shes quite marvellous.

After a tremendous impact in her first big role in the Australia film Suburban Mayhem (an underrated gem if ever there was one), Wasikowska, like so many of our talented people, was snapped up by Hollywood and has appeared with distinction in Lisa Cholodenkos The Kids are All Right, Tim Burtons Alice in Wonderland and Gus van Sants upcoming Restless (which premiered this year at Cannes).

As Jane Eyre, a role she was born to play, she radiates solemn intelligence and wide-eyed innocence along with intrinsic pride and idealism.

As Edward Rochester, the mysterious owner of Thornfield Hall, Michael Fassbender is also particularly well cast. His first appearance, seen by Jane on horseback, is a splendid moment that creates exactly the right mood of excitement and danger.

The love afir at the storys centre is in first-class hands. In the book, it must be said, Rochester is depicted as being considerably less attractive, and Jane is literally a plain Jane, something that cant be said for Wasikowska. These concessions arent unwelcome.

Im assuming just about everyone knows the story. In this version, adapted by Moira Buffini (who scripted the smart British comedy Tamara Drewe) and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, the story is told non-sequentially, beginning as Jane flees Thornfield janeeyre by charlotte bronteinto a wild, storm-tossed landscape of beautiful but dangerous moors and eventually seeks shelter in the home of a clergyman, St John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his sisters.

Flashbacks then take us back to Janes childhood (in these scenes Amelia Clarkson plays the character). Orphaned, she is mistreated by her aunt, Mrs Reed (Sally Hawkins having a break from the eternally sunny character she usually plays),nick lachey and sent to a charity school where she befriends poor, doomed Helen Burns (Freya Parks).

In her late teens (now played by Wasikowska), Jane is sent to Thornfield as governess to Adele (Romy Settbon Moore), the ward of the usually absent Rochester, and finds a friend in housekeeper Mrs Faix (Judi Dench, bringing great substance to the role).

Fukunaga, whose ther is Japanese and mother is Swedish, was largely reared in the US. There he directed what is so r his only other film, the well-regarded Sin Nombre, a thriller set in Mexico that sadly hasnt received a commercial release in this country.

He wasnt the most obvious choice to direct this perennial love story but he has done an outstanding job, bringing an outsiders eye to capture details of Britains class structure in the 19th century and a poets vision to the beautiful, lowering landscapes.

This is the best adaptation of the novel since the 1943 version.

Jane Eyre (M)

4 stars

National release
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 13, 2011 5:39 pm

http://meteorsky83.wordpress.com/2011/08/13/jane-eyre-by-cary-fukunaga/

Jane Eyre, 2011(by Cary Fukunaga)
Posted on August 13, 2011

I’ve been a fan of Jane Eyre ever since I read the story when I was in Junior High. Her character is so ahead of her time, and I appreciate that quiet spunk lurking underneath her poise. So I watched the latest Jane Eyre movie, directed by Cary Fukunaga, as soon as it came out on Amazon rental.

I didn’t have high expectation, because the trailer didn’t seem so impressive and earlier review was mixed. But after I watched this film, I feel that this is the best film I’ve seen this year thus far. I’d say this is my favorite after The English Patient. One feature that stood out was the cinematography, especially the outdoor scenes with Jane and Rochester. There was a scene where the two of them are standing by the trees, and I suspect that the photographer used a different lens to film that part, because it had this dreamy, polaroid quality to the screen picture. And in turn, the couple look like the happiest people on earth.

I love the casting of Mia Wasikowska for Jane, she looked and act the part. I was first skeptical about Michael Fassbender playing Mr. Rochester. Mr. Rochester is suppose to be old, and broody. And based on watching him in Inglorious Basterds, Fassbender doesn’t strike me as that personality. So why pick a handsome guy like Fassbender to play Rochester? To demonstrate my point, when I talked to Marlana about the Jane Eyre plot, she replied “I read that during high school, didn’t she fall in love with her boss? And he’s REALLY old?!” However, Fassbender’s acting took me by surprise… his portrayal of Rochester captured all the nuance. My favorite part in the movie is this witty exchange:

Rochester: Here’s fifty.
Jane Eyre: That’s too much!
Rochester: Take your wages, Jane.
Jane Eyre: I cannot.
Rochester: Then I only have ten.
[she takes the money]
Jane Eyre: Now you owe me.
Rochester: Indeed I do. In time. I shall safe guard it here.
[pats coat pocket on his heart where he's placed the rest of the money]
Rochester: Do you trust me to keep it?
Jane Eyre: Not a wit, sir. But you are not to be trusted at all.

I wouldn’t mind watching this for the second, and third time (just like The English Patient). There’s a timeless quality about Jane Eyre, as Cary Fukunaga commented that “there was an unwritten law requiring that “Jane Eyre” be remade every five years.” An interesting side note is that Jane Eyre is by far the most filmed classic 19th-century novel, looks like Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett have some serious competitions. : )
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 13, 2011 5:44 pm

http://beachandbay.com.au/realestateblog/movie-review-jane-eyre-now-showing-at-cronulla-cinemas/

Movie Review: Jane Eyre, now showing at Cronulla Cinemas

by Andrew_Buckle on August 13, 2011

For the umpteenth film/television adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s classic 1847 novel, American filmmaker Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nobre) is the man at the helm. The story is largely presented through flashbacks, which could prove confusing to viewers who have not read the novel. Opening with Jane’s (Mia Wasikowska) leave from Thornfield Manor in the early morning, the hand-held camera tracks her across the barren countryside, across the fog-swept plains and eventually to the rain-soaked moors where she finds herself inconsolable and nearing death. She stumbles across the cottage of St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his two sisters, where she is taken care of until her health returns.

The film flashes back to Jane’s childhood, where she lives as an orphan with her abusive aunt (Sally Hawkins) and her children. She is eventually enrolled at Lowood School for girls, with the reputation of misbehaviour and being deceitful, which also impacts on the way she is treated at school. Having completed school, Jane is sent to work as a governess at Thornfield Manor alongside housekeeper Mrs Fairfax (Judy Dench), where she would work as tutor for the daughter of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender), the master of the house. When she first meets Rochester she is both repelled by his abrupt arrogance and attracted to his swooning charm and intelligence. As Jane grows to desire him, and he in-turn develops feelings for her, they ignore their class differences and vow to marry. That is, until a sinister secret from Rochester’s past forces her to flee.

From my understanding of the novel there are spooky gothic undertones that plague the entire story, especially when the story is set in Thornfield Manor. Fukunaga has tried to heighten these elements, in an attempt to differentiate his adaptation from previous ones that have stuck to the romance and not utilised the spookiness as prominently. I think Fukunaga establishes his intentions very well early on, but it never reaches the heights that were intended. But, the clever use of the natural environment creates a sense of foreboding as Jane crosses the moors and shooting scenes at Thornfield solely through the illumination of candlelight, the whispers and creaks in the night and the mysterious fire all provide effective chills.

Mia Wasikowska, whose performance in The Kids Are All Right was quite underrated amongst a renowned cast of veterans, is a star in the making. With her attractiveness augmented, her compelling work here is emotionally diverse and effectively shines through Jane’s intelligence, independence and strong sense of conscience that makes her such a respected protagonist. Michael Fassbender, always excellent, is equally good as the charming Rochester. The chemistry between the two feels genuine. Judi Dench should just be cast in every old woman role; whether they are cranky and frightening, or kind and cheeky, she plays it to perfection.

Jane Eyre is elegant, fiery, creepy and romantic, and easily digestible for a period piece. While the dialogue, which came across as being transferred straight from the novel, takes some attention to grasp, the film has stunning production design, features some impressive photographic trickery and is lusciously costumed. Key events are skimmed over, which diminishes the impact of some scenes, and makes others redundant and downright improbable and it also doesn’t quite reach the heights of its gothic intentions in the latter half. But, overall, I found it quite enjoyable.

Jane Eyre opens in now showing at Cronulla Cinemas. I rate the film 3 ½ Stars.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 13, 2011 6:54 pm

http://www.filmreviews.net.au/2011/08/jane-eyre/

JANE EYRE
by Roy

Reviewed by GREG KING

Director: Cary Fukunaga

Stars: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins, Jamie Bell, Simon McBurney.

This is the umpteenth version of Charlotte Bronte’s classic 1847 novel about a plain, obscure and poor orphan girl who lands a job as a governess and eventually captures the heart of her mysterious employer. The most famous version of this story is arguably the 1943 production starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine. This 22nd version of the timeless Gothic romance is a visually sumptuous and handsomely mounted production, but it is also quite bland and dull.
When the film opens, Jane (Mia Wasikowska) is stumbling across the windswept moors, and ends up at the home of novice pastor St John Rivers (Jamie Bell, of Billy Elliot fame). He nurses her back to health. Through a series of extended flashbacks we get Jane’s story. Orphaned she was raised by her imperious aunt (Sally Hawkins), until she was sent to the local boarding house. Always strong of mind, independent and wilful Jane finds herself in trouble. Eventually she lands a position as governor at Thornfield Hall, where she encounters the mysterious master of the manor Mr Rochester (Michael Fassbender, from Hunger, etc).
Having previously played Alice in Tim Burton’s visually bold version of Alice In Wonderland, Australian actress Wasikowska seems to be the current go to girl for playing virginal heroines of English literature. And she delivers a nicely nuanced performance in a role that has previously been played by the likes of Joan Fontaine, Charlotte Gainsbourg and the late Susannah York.
Fassbender (from the recent X-Men First Class, etc) makes for a handsome Mr Rochester, but his performance is fairly perfunctory. There is a lack of passion and fire between the two leads, which also holds the film back. Judi Dench brings her usual class to her performance as Mrs Fairfax, the kindly housekeeper.
The screenplay from Moira Buffini (the recent Tamara Drewe) is surprisingly atmospheric and literate, and she has pared the novel back to the basic essentials. However, a mini-series is probably the only way in which to fully explore the novel, its complex characters and rich themes, and do justice to Bronte’s vision.
Some stilted and rather pedestrian direction from Cary Fukunaga (the excellent Mexican drama Sin Nombre, etc) doesn’t allow the audience to fully engage with the story. However, technical contributions are excellent. Adriano Goldman’s gorgeous cinematography brings to life the inhospitable moors, and brings a foreboding atmosphere to Rochester’s imposing, brooding home. Will Hughes-Jones’s production design is stunning and rich in period detail, while Michael O’Connor’s costumes lend further authenticity.
While it may beautiful to look at, this new version of Jane Eyre fails to generate much excitement or passion.
**1/2
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 27093
Join date : 2009-09-20
Location : California

Back to top Go down

Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 5 of 6 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum