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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:44 pm

http://boyaloud.blogspot.com/2011/04/2011-movies-part-2.html

Next, I saw what is probably my favorite movie of the year so far, Cary Fukunaga's adaptation of the classic Jane Eyre. Starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, this movie is acted perfectly and looks beautiful the entire time. Having been only slightly familiar with the original tale, I felt this film was a perfect introduction to the story and helped to present it as one of the most beautiful love stories that exists. Wasikowska has so much potential that is put to work in this movie that I'm excited to see where she goes with her career and the same for Fassbender and Fukunaga. Definitely see this movie when you get the chance.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:02 pm

http://astheysayinparis.blogspot.com/2011/04/book-to-film-stresses-me-out.html

Thursday, April 28, 2011
book-to-film stresses me out
I saw Jane Eyre.

* Michael Fassbender as Rochester was PERFECT
* Begins with Jane’s flight from Thornfield, and she has flashbacks at the Rivers residence of her life up to that point, which weave together nicely
* Lots of shots of people walking down hallways
* Lovely to watch, but they sacrificed storytelling to build atmosphere
* Adult Jane was too silent and stoic. Child Jane did NOT grow up to be that woman: I mean, the kid jumped on her cousin and started beating him up and then told off her aunt. Adult Jane was completely uninteresting (perhaps possessed by spirit of Helen) with the exception of two witty sentences shot at Rochester. Why couldn’t they let her talk more? I loved what she had to say when she did talk; in the book she talked; in other adaptations she’s got plenty to say; I DON’T LIKE HAVING TO “READ VOLUMES” ON AN ACTOR’S FACE FOR THE ENTIRETY OF A FILM. There were times when I thought Mia Wasikowska was going to burst from having to stay silent when there was so much inside the character clamoring to get out, like even she didn’t know why Jane had to be quiet. But the director clamped her mouth shut and made her stare at fires.
* I loved the Rivers family for the first time in my life
* ... but, too much film time spent with the Riverses in comparison to Thornfield
* Hardly any Blanche Ingram: thus, absolutely zero doubt that Rochester does not love Jane
* If there’s anything that frustrates me about book-to-film adaptations it’s the lessening of the tension and/or suspense. Books are convenient in that they can draw out and wordify a scene or an emotion until it’s alive in the reader as well, but even a book can be snappy if it chooses. If a book (even a short story! see "The Quiet Man" or "Spice Pogrom") can bring something to life in a reader, a movie should certainly be able to do the same. All you have to do is replicate the emotion. You don’t even have to replicate the EVENT, as long as you replicate the emotion! And one of the primary emotions in Jane Eyre is uncertainty, and because of it, misery. The movie gave Jane no reason to be miserable. Even when the wedding falls apart and she runs off sobbing, I hadn’t FELT anything, so not only did I not believe that Jane had a reason to cry, I didn’t care. And it’s JANE EYRE, one of the most heartbreaking characters in literature. They zipped through the heart of the story, and I understand that Jane was supposed to be the brakes to Rochester’s full speed ahead, but that’s an incorrect way of telling the story, and the reason I kept turning the pages of the book was because both Rochester and Jane herself fed Jane equal amounts of certainty, confusion, elation, and doubt, the result of which was those same emotions shooting through me, but there was none of that present in the film (with the exception of Fassbender's "Jane... of whom do you think I speak?"). There was something off and I can’t quite put my finger on it and I don’t know if all it needs is ten extra minutes of scenes with them or a complete rebuilding of their portrayed relationship or if it’s all due to Mia’s annoying stoicism.
* Music alternated between beautiful and creepy
* The time spent on Jane’s childhood was short but poignant and perfectly portrayed the essence of that part of the story. TOO BAD THEY COULDN’T HAVE DONE THAT WITH THE SCENES AT THORNFIELD.
* The trailer was better than the movie. I want to watch it over and over like it's a short film.

Final feelings: I like the book, I don’t love it, so I didn’t think it would bother me to be disappointed—but somewhere along the way I got really excited, which by this point I should recognize as a harbinger of doom. I had been warned that the movie was disappointing; I had been told it was terrific; I wanted to be blown away and I was disappointed to be disappointed. Perhaps this will play out like Keira’s Pride & Prejudice and be surprisingly good the second time viewed.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:22 pm

http://www.reformer.com/ovation/ci_17945246?source=rss

Newest cinematic ‘Jane Eyre’ lives up to Bronte’s masterful novel
By NATHAN HURLBUT
Updated: 04/28/2011 12:43:47 AM EDT

Thursday April 28, 2011

HARRISVILLE, N.H.

Jane Eyre -- When you consider the influence of a groundbreaking work like "Jane Eyre," it isn’t surprising that it remains as popular today as it was in 1847, when Charlotte Bronte’s original novel was first published. Featuring a capable and headstrong female character, the story displays feminist themes that were certainly ahead of their time -- so much so that the novel’s stature has continued to grow over the years.

For that reason, it isn’t surprising that so many movie adaptations have been made from Bronte’s lengthy tome. I can remember watching the 1944 version with Joan Fontaine and the great Orson Welles and discovering how fascinated I was by the intriguing story. Never mind the fact that I was seeing it on a tiny black-and-white television sitting on a bare hardwood floor -- I found myself slowly sucked into the compelling tale and was completely engrossed from the beginning until the final frame.

Such an acclaimed novel certainly leaves a lot to live up to, and adapting a great book into an enjoyable movie like those filmmakers did almost 70 years ago can be a daunting task. Film is obviously a very different medium than the written word, and it is an easy proposition to turn a highly esteemed work of literature into something imminently respectable and, consequently, quite dull.

Fortunately director Cary Fukunaga’s new cinematic adaptation is anything but dull, refusing to become another unnecessary addition to the long list of "Jane Eyre" adaptations. Rather than treating Bronte’s novel as a sacred text, Fukunaga and screenwriter Moira Buffini manage to locate the emotional intimacy beneath all the literary accolades and create quite a compelling movie in the process.

The cinematography in this specific adaptation alone is spectacular, retaining the novel’s gothic atmosphere with frequently beautiful images onscreen. It proves to be an essential aspect here since it not only sets the time period and dark tone of the movie, but also creates a world that is completely enveloping as well.

The filmmakers also wisely chose not to cast well-established movie stars in either of the main roles, preserving Bronte’s vision of lead characters that were more plain looking than glamorous. For example, here, Jane’s (Mia Wasikowska) severe hairstyle effectively masks the passion burning within her, symbolically portraying the repressive social structures that Jane must outwardly adhere to while not allowing such restrictions to diminish her independent spirit. Wasikowska successfully works within this framework too, allowing her character’s inner passion and strong personal will to seep through the restrictive nature of the time period in which she lives, creating a feminine desire for freedom that doesn’t incongruously update it for the modern era.

Michael Fassbender is an appropriately brooding Rochester as well, making his character’s frequently questionable behavior both charismatic and repellent, and creating an intriguingly personality as complicated as Jane herself. As opposed to Welles’ formidably dashing romantic figure in the 1944 version, Fassbender wisely brings the role more down to earth here, creating a more realistic, but equally dramatic Rochester that would seem more in keeping with Bronte’s original creation. The understated way in which these two actors display their character’s emotions makes their inner passion, and consequently the romantic elements of the story, that much more convincing.

They are certainly aided by equally impressive performances in supporting roles. Sally Hawkins is suitably abominable as Jane’s Aunt Sarah here, her cold cruelty towards Jane both persuasive and horrifying. Her impressive display of personal malice provides a powerfully succinct summary of Jane’s tortured childhood, a crucial aspect considering this specific version’s condensation of Jane’s early life. Meanwhile Judi Dench is equally memorable as the housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax, dishing out gossip and questionable advice to Jane in a manner that betrays her character’s adherence to the conventions of the times, and effectively providing a contrast to Jane’s own independent spirit.

While the question of whether the world needs yet another cinematic adaptation of "Jane Eyre" is certainly a valid one, it quickly becomes irrelevant when watching this new version, allowing you to easily forget that you may already know this story from the start. This specific adaptation manages a delicate balance of both thoughtful and passionate, respectful of Bronte’s original text while finding a fresh new way to make her story compelling as well. In fact, it may very well be that this version is the truest to the spirit of Bronte’s original masterpiece itself.

Rated PG-13.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:25 pm

http://thiessenbros.blogspot.com/2011/04/it-was-pure-coincidence-if-you-believe.html

Thursday, 28 April, 2011
Jane Eyre

It was pure coincidence (if you believe in such things) that during the past three days I saw the only two films Cary Fukunaga has directed and saw Sally Hawkins in two films back-to-back. Not that there is any resemblance between Fukunaga’s two films or between Hawkins’ two roles (she has only a small role in Jane Eyre).

Indeed, it is hard to imagine a greater difference between Fukunaga’s two films. From the bright green crowded landscape of 21st-century Mexico we go to the bleak desolate moors of 19th-century England. From a wild and violent adventure yarn we go to an incredibly slow-moving and quiet drama. The only resemblance between the two films is that both are about young quiet women struggling against the odds to move forward in life.

Jane Eyre is a classic gothic novel given an old-fashioned classic gothic filming and I found that refreshing. Beautifully filmed and well-acted, with an emphasis on characters and with what I can only assume was a fair amount of Charlotte Bronte’s original dialogue, there is little in this film that separates it from the classic epic films of old.

Mia Wasikowska as Jane is altogether too accomplished an actress for her age. I knew when I first saw her in the first season of In Treatment that she had a great career ahead of her. Michael Fassbender is quite acceptable as Rochester and the romance between Jane and Rochester almost works (I mean that as a compliment). Judi Dench is her usually brilliant self as Rochester’s housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax.

If Jane Eyre hadn’t faded a little in the last half hour, I think I would have given Fukunaga his second straight four-star film. Not that I am complaining about the ending or that it’s predictable, because of course the story is very familiar to me (though it has been decades since I read the novel), so there are few surprises. But from the point in the story when a variety of secrets are revealed, I was not as impressed with the way it was filmed as I had been up to that point. So I am going to settle for ***+. If you want to watch a gorgeous old-fashioned gothic romance, don’t miss seeing this on the big screen. My mug is up, toasting a brilliant young filmmaker.
Posted by Vic at 12:10 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun May 01, 2011 9:37 pm

http://genepick.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre.html

Jane Eyre
1 May

BC | 3:08 PM |

Right now all of the single guys reading this are like "dude, why would you willingly submit yourself to two hours of this?"

All of the married guys are like "yeah, I understand. Hopefully you had good popcorn and soda."

After spending last Sunday flying across the county and immediately passing out upon seeing my bed, the wife and I ventured out to see Jane Eyre. I wish I could give you an in depth review of this movie, but instead I will list all of things I did to pass the time:

#1- Tried to translate what the actors were saying from the 1800's to 2011.

#2- Tried to figure out exactly what days each of the NBA Playoff series would be played this week, and how I can plan to watch as much of the Boston/Miami series as possible.

#3- Tried to take a brief nap.

#4- Got up to go to the bathroom.

#5- Laughed at the fact that two other people were actually in the theater with us.

#6- Wondered how hard my friends will laugh when the find out that I went and saw this. Good thing they are also married.

#7- Tried to take another brief nap.

#8- Considered getting up to buy Sour Patch Watermelons before deciding not to. Bad decision by me.

#9- Giggled like a schoolboy at the painting of a naked woman in the movie.

#10- Secretly hoped the painting didn't get burned in the fire.

As you can tell I wasn't exactly focusing on the movie. Sorry about that. I will pass along that the wife enjoyed it, and I will leave the rankings below up to her. For the single guys that are still reading this one day you will see a movie like this, I just recommend saving up some things to think about for 2 hours.


Jane Eyre
Directed by: Cary Fukunaga
Written by: Charlotte Brontë, and Moira Buffini
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell
My The Wife's Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Would Gene Mrs. Gene Pick it?: Yes, but it's no Pride and Prejudice
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun May 01, 2011 9:41 pm

http://loveyalit.com/?p=2506

1 May

Alicia is back! Alicia is a music, movie, and book lover with a critical eye and a feminist heart. A freelance artist of many talents, when opportunities arise Alicia finds herself a writer, editor, performer, radio DJ, and cultural commentator, particularly on pop culture and the media. She blogs over at pop!goesalicia and guest posts with us here at Love YA Lit once a month!

You know the story; orphan girl is tormented by wicked aunt and eventually sent to a home for girls where she is treated equally as awful. Upon maturation, girl is sent to serve as a governess for the unwanted child of a stoic barrister. Girl falls in love with barrister but before they can marry discovers the skeleton in his closet – quite literally. Girl flees once again finding refuge with a minister and his sisters, until she is once again forced to leave for refusing to marry the man she loves as a brother. Ok, maybe its not exactly your average teen story, especially in Hollywood, but Jane Eyre is a modern role model more worthy of our attention than most of the mainstream media’s offerings. A timeless reflection of a young woman’s search for autonomy Jane’s journey is not unlike the path that all young women must travel.

Orphaned and left in the custody of her cruel Aunt Reed and her abusive son, Jane learns early on the difference between good and evil, as well as the consequences that await a girl who stands up for the truth. It is this commitment to Jane’s integrity and sense of morality that separates writer Moira Buffini’s interpretation of Charlotte Bronte’s manuscript from the previous 18 adaptations. Director Cary Fukanaga further distinguishes his film through artful imagery, an emotional original score composed by Dario Marianelli and performed by Jack Liebeck, and a stellar leading lady, Mia Wasikowska. The love story, between Jane and her employer, Mr. Rochester, the passionate Michael Fassbender, is secondary in this version. Instead, Fukanaga explores Jane’s relationship to solitude and the fine line that differentiates it from isolation. In doing so, he has created a site for young women to recognize the injustices of female adolescence and, thanks to a transcendent performance by Wasikowska, a teen character with traits worth emulating.

The film excels by making the isolation Jane experiences tangible. Opening with her departure from Thornfield Hall, a wide lens follows Jane as she treks across barren landscapes under gray skies, crying and collapsing. Fukanaga returns to similar moments of a solitary Jane in an empty world throughout the film but none of these images relate the unbearable sense of loneliness as the scene in the boarding school where Jane has been sent by her Aunt. In order to distract the teacher from beating her only friend, the young Jane allows her writing tablet to drop to the floor and smash. Left to stand alone on a chair in an empty room without food or water, the schools sinister headmaster, Mr. Brocklehurst, warns the other girls, “to withhold the hand of friendship from Jane Eyre,” deftly illustrating what young women today experience from their “Mean girl” peers.

At Thornfield, where she is employed as Governess to the unwanted child of the master of the house, Mr. Rochester, Jane’s isolation begins to evolve into a more self-governed solitude, as her only options are the elderly Mrs. Fairbanks (Dame Judi Dench) and the child she cares for. The isolation remains present in her young charge, the French-speaking Adele, for whom language is a barrier. Upon first meeting Jane, Adele confides to Jane “Nobody speaks to us,” a resounding truth for generations of unheard female voices.

The absence of choice that has defined Jane’s life and the commendable way in which she perseveres are what is most important for teen viewers to see. From an abused orphan to an alienated governess her life has not been her own, yet to the best of her ability she consistently makes choices that are in her own best interest. When she discovers Rochester’s secret, on their wedding day, she is not persuaded by his urging her to stay because, as he decides, no one would have to know. “And what about truth?” Jane asks and then she leaves. She refuses to live his lie or to live his life.

Many would say that Bronte was ahead of her time by creating a story and character that has remained so relatable to generations of women, and it’s true. But is also true that the world has not changed as much as we’d like to think. Everyday young women are overwhelmed with images and expectations that encourage conforming to traditional expectations rather than empowering them towards independence and self-discovery. Hollywood is the epi-center of this struggle where women are outnumbered both behind and in-front of the camera. By re-introducing audiences to an enduring role model, Jane Eyre reminds girls that listening to your own truth is the only way to be truly free.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Sun May 01, 2011 9:45 pm

http://charmainesgibblegabble.blogspot.com/2011/05/movie-review-new-jane-eyre.html

Sunday, May 1, 2011
MOVIE REVIEW - THE NEW JANE EYRE
The New Jane Eyre

I am a Jane Eyre Aficionado. I have loved the novel since I was a young girl. The story has so much merit to show us how character can be developed in spite of growing up in difficult circumstances. Jane Eyre does not compromise her standards and do the thing that feels good rather than that which is right. We need heroines today who stick to their values and moral beliefs.

There has been 18 versions of Jane Eyre on the screen. These are my favorites and a critique of the new Jane Eyre.

In 1983 my husband gave me a VCR copy of the Timothy Dalton version, which is 4 hours long. I have watched it dozens of times over the years. It is pure escapism for me. I never tire of it. No one has ever played Rochester quite like Dalton. He is too handsome for the part but his acting, brogue, and sheer sparkle is so captivating that your eyes are glued to him. He definitely steals the show from Jane in this version who is a little too understated and mousy. But she doesn’t ruin it for me.

In 2006 Masterpiece Theatre produced yet another 4 hour movie. The chemistry in this version between Jane and Rochester may be the best of all. This Jane is a little more antimated and pretty. Rochester is good but not Dalton caliber. I felt the romance and passion between the characters stronger in this adaptation and the ending is wonderfully delightful as they take the story a step further. It was a very satisfying conclusion.

The new Jane Eyre, made for the mass market, suffers from its two hours. I like Mia Wasikowska as Jane. She may be the best character image. Michael Fassbender was just OK as Rochester. He didn’t ruin it but didn’t sparkle in the part. The chemistry was somewhat lacking and because of the shortness of the movie it didn’t get time to develop. My husband remarked that the romance didn’t feel quite real. It didn’t bother me but then I have so much history in the story that it naturally flows for me.

Thornfield hall was perfect, feeling like the residence of Count Dracula. However the lighting was too dark through the entire movie. There was lots of natural candle light with shadows and candle glow on faces and places. It had its charm but more light in parts would have been a good contrast.

The movie wanted to have a unique twist so it began in the middle when Jane runs away. Then the story moves in flashbacks. It didn’t bother me, but I can see how it could get confusing to someone not familiar with the story.

When Jane is taken in by St. John Rivers and his sisters it is never revealed that she is related to them. I liked that. It always seemed a little to coincidental but then perhaps it was Providence.

For the shortness of the movie there was still some long contemplative scenes, beautifully thoughtful and emotional that surprised me were left in. The ending was rushed and did not satisfy. But still I liked it very much. A friend who saw it was very disappointed. Maybe it is hard to ruin Jane Eyre for me. 3 of 4 stars.
Posted by CHARMAINE at 9:45 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:23 pm

http://tuulenhaiven.wordpress.com/2011/05/02/movie-mayhem-march-april/

Jane Eyre (Dir. Cary Fukenaga. Writ. Moira Buffini. Based on the novel by Charlotte Bronte. Stars Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender. UK, 2011.) I’m still trying to wrap my head around this recent envisioning of one of my favorite books. I can’t decide if I liked it or not. There were things that I LOVED about it – like Mia Wasikowska’s performance as Jane. BRILLIANT. There were things that I liked about Michael Fassbender’s Mr. Rochester. He was certainly distinctive – a bit scary. This is definitely a man whose mind is very unstable, with madness hovering. Which is pretty much as it should be. I liked the feel of the film, and the cinematography was often stunning. The music was lovely too. I think my biggest complaint would be that it seemed choppy. I would almost say rushed, but the pacing of the film was pretty good – there were just bits missing, which I know because I’ve read the book, obviously, but it was more than that. Perhaps the choppiness, the feeling of having arrived too suddenly at the next major plot point, can be excused because the story was told in a series of lengthy flashbacks, instead of linearly. Hmm. Maybe. on the laneAlso, the scary bits all seemed to fizzle. I remember watching the BBC mini-series with Timothy Dalton and Zelah Clarke as a kid and being absolutely petrified at every part that dealt with the mad woman in the attic. And Mrs. Poole (a nearly non-existent character in Fukenaga’s version) was also spooky. In Fukenaga’s film, the scary bits are extremely understated, which almost makes sense and I almost liked the effect. Being so used to the full-blown epic Gothic romance though, effected my impressions of this version. Which really only means I want to see this one again. There were stellar bits in it too – such as when Jane first encounters Rochester in the eerie twilight lane… Anyway, very interesting film. I’m reserving final judgement on it for the moment.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:25 pm

http://ravenfilmsandreviews.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre-2011-review.html

Monday, May 2, 2011
Jane Eyre (2011) Review

Based upon the 1847 novel by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre tells the story of an orphan girl by the name of Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska from last year's billion dollar hit Alice in Wonderland) who after years of abuse at an all-girl school travels to Thornfield House where she is employed as a governess (that's a fancy word for a nanny) by the dark, abrupt, almost sinister Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender). Jane and her employer soon become friends and she finds herself falling in love with him, much to the chagrin of herself and the head housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench). As time passes Jane learns that Mr. Rochester is harboring a very dark secret. Don't worry, I won't give away any spoilers suffice it to say that he isn't a vampire.

You know your movie is in trouble when the biggest criticism from me is the lead actress. Mia Wasikowska is not a particularly talented actress. In this film she is flat, lifeless and just plain boring. She is only "going through the motions" and delivers the lines as though she is reading them directly off cue cards. For the first two-thirds of the film she does no emoting whatsoever. Then in the last act of the film she does nothing but emote. By then I want to say "Frankly, my dear I don't give a damn". Her casting in the film has "studio" written all over it. She was the lead in a majorly successful film last year so it seems only natural that she would continue to be cast in lead roles despite not having enough talent to carry an entire film. There is an actress who also appears in the film by the name of Tamzin Merchant who would have been a far better choice for the title character.

Fear not fellow cinephiles. I did not hate everything about the film. As a matter of fact with the exception of the above paragraph I quite enjoyed the rest of the film. The performances by Michael Fassbender (who reminds me of a younger Daniel Day-Lewis) and Judi Dench are fantastic. Although could you expect any less from Judi Dench? Everything you need to know about both of their characters is subtly shown in their first scenes. For example Mr. Rochester is shown wearing a black hat and black coat with black trousers while riding a black horse with a black dog in tow. Those color choices, obviously no accident, automatically give us a feeling of foreboding and mystery around the character that we are intrigued by.

The cinematography, art direction, production design and costumes all fit together like the pieces of a gothic period puzzle. The film is sure to receive Oscar nominations in one or more of those categories. Cinematographer Adriano Goldman, whose work I must admit I am not familiar with, creates a bleak canvas of near-winter in the film, not just with exterior scenes, but the interior as well. One gets the feeling that it is colder inside the buildings then outside.

Overall, if asked by a friend, I'd recommend it but prepare to be unmoved and unaffected by Wasikowska's wooden acting.
Posted by Raven Films And Reviews at 11:30 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:27 pm

http://linwickclearyrevolution.blogspot.com/2011/05/on-beauty-and-being-just.html

Monday, May 2, 2011
On Beauty and Being Just
A review of Jane Eyre by C. Cleary

Directed by Cary Fukunaga

Written by Moira Buffini, adapted from the novel by Charlotte Brontë

Starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, and Jamie Bell
Score: ☆☆☆


When I resolved to write a short review of the new Jane Eyre movie as a means of 1) placating our thousands of hungry, loyal readers and 2) staving off threats of superiority from a vicious competing cohort blog, I promised myself that I would avoid pettily commenting upon the fact that JANE EYRE DOES NOT LOOK LIKE THAT!! Instead, I'm going to do just that. Mostly because when I was Google Image searching "Jane Eyre 2011" to find an image for this post, this blog came up, and in it, the author concluded: "But the driving force of Jane Eyre is the remarkable portrayal of Jane by Mia Wasikowska, whose absorbing performance and beautiful presence magnify the film’s visual beauty."

Um......yes. And this is the problem.


Is it an absorbing performance? Yes! Of Jane Eyre? Not really. A new Jane Eyre, maybe. I don't mean to enforce adherence to the original text or anything (yes, I do), but what happened to Jane's stubborn assertiveness? In the film, she loses most of it after age ten, partially because Jane's splendid narration is missing, leaving, in the film, eye contact and Jane's "beautiful presence" onscreen to bear the heavy brunt of communicating Jane's insoluble will (yes, insoluble--as in, not dissolved by Rochester's domineering presence).

Jane's not directing anymore--instead, she's obeying orders and crying on cliffs as we stare at her face. But Jane did not lay herself over the rain-stained cliffs of the heath to cry never-ending torrents of tears like a mourning seal when Rochester would leave for a few days or intend to marry a dum-dum or whatever. She was like eff that, it is raining out here and I've still got to govern this silly French girl for four more hours today, and then draw strange drawings revealing my even stranger soul.



Am I arguing that visual beauty is overrated in film? Never, my friends. Never. But the camera's fetishization of the well-lit and well-proportioned/traditionally beautiful female face is not to be conflated with the beauty of the landscape (a la Joe Wright's Pride & Prejudice), or, if you want to think about it this way, set in contrast to the sublimity of the gothic landscape, to begin to mean only its pleasing (pleasingly feminine) image. Especially when you're adapting texts about female characters who are not chiefly beautiful. Jane Eyre's face is boring. It's a blank space! Don't even try to look at it!

Okayyyy, you're right, reader--I'm being unfair. I can't think of an actress with a face uninteresting enough to satisfy me as Jane (does such a thing even exist? has filmic representation ever not endowed the object with meaning?)



In sum, it's hard work to film this so novel-y of novels, and maybe shouldn't be attempted. After all, besides the fact that I don't want Jane Eyre to have a face, there's not supposed to be a lot to see (I'm going to refrain from making an analogy to Bertha's imprisonment/Rochester's blindness...ahem). It's Jane's narration and novelistic presence, and not necessarily the events of the plot, that drive the novel. All you've got is nothing happening + very little happening while you wait for something significant to happen. Well, you know, until all that crazy s$#! starts happening. But there's no time for this in the film, so what were incredibly powerful plot moments lose their potency and become a series of not entirely satisfying cheap thrills (I use the term "cheap thrills" loosely...). See marginal utility. And so, as my roommate pointed out, an adaptation like this one has difficulty granting its scenes enough silence and space for viewer anticipation to develop. So what I'm advocating for here is Jane Eyre doing very little in a dark, dark house with a blurred-out face and voice over narration. Yes....


Hmm, wait a minute--this review sounds altogether negative, but in truth, I thoroughly enjoyed watching this movie, especially for the following reasons:


1. Gothic to the max
2. Rochester: yes.
3. cinematography: yes.
4. Mia's acting is a pleasure to watch. It's true.
5. Excellent job of illuminating the dynamics of Western culture--i.e. "oh, wait--Rochester was actually taking advantage of this girl who knew no other life, huh?" There's a nice scene in which Jane and Mrs. Fairfax are looking out the window of the house as Jane vents her frustration about this.
6. costumes

And there you have it.

P.S. Yes, this blog post title intentionally mocks Elaine Scarry. I'm sorry.

P.P.S. The star system is temporarily suspended until we figure out just how the hell to quantify our opinions of a film's merits.

P.P.P.S. I apologize for using the word "fetishization."

P.P.P.P.P.S. Bessie McAdams, you need to guest blog about this movie!
Posted by cassiecle at 12:59 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:27 pm

http://doozeyjames.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre-is-sublime.html

Monday, May 2, 2011
Jane Eyre is sublime
Sorry I was away, I had an incredibly difficult and challenging week last week. The best part of it was that I was working hard to get a play into a competition - which I succeeded in doing. It is amazing how nervous I get when it comes to putting my work out there. But I am sure most creatives feel this way. I don't know why it shocks me. I was thinking I might start a separate blog with some of my writing - what do you think?

The good thing is that while I've been away ideas have been piling up. I had another piece I wanted to start this week with - but then something wonderful happened on Friday evening. When after I had handed my play in, I found myself with absolutely nothing to do - not even be a Mum. So I went to one of my favorite places on earth - the theatre (film). I've said this before but I will say it again - if there is a place that I go to pray, where I feel closest to god and the magic of the universe (other than out in Nature) it is the movie theatre - for me it is the magic of story and the potential to touch people's souls with story, and the communal effect of the theatre itself that touches my spirit so wonderfully - I love it, I love it so much. All of us sitting in that darkened room together, being affected - together, by a story. Wow. Heaven.

On Friday I had no idea what I was going to see. Than I saw Jane Eyre was playing. I had loved the story when I was a teenager - all right, I thought, I'll see that. What a treat - I was soooo lucky. The story is so well told, it really captures the sombreness and darkness of the tale - especially how it comes alive in the imagination of a young girl - both Jane Eyre and most of the book's readers. It holds those moments, that are bursting with potential romance to the extreme - and this is important because that is what that story was all about for so many young girls. Mr. Rochester is played to perfection by Michael Fassbender - both his potential austere cold heartedness (or is it meanness, if that is a word?) and his intelligent pining for a kindred spirit.

My heart leapt when I saw Dame Judy Dench was playing Miss Fairfax. I love Judi Dench - she is one of my favorite actors on this planet and if she is in something I take it as a very good sign.

Finally Mia Wasikowska was brilliant as Jane. Absolutely brilliant. I was in awe of her subtlety - at how well she could play the 'plain Jane' while revealing her gorgeous full heart and lovely soul just bursting to be free underneath. She made this film.

The Direction and editing were amazing - especially the work with the candlelight and the endless austerity of the Moors. The film took over my imagination in this respect - it did such a good job portraying what it would have been like at that time. How scary it would have been for a young girl out on her own as Jane was.

Thank you Jane Eyre for making my Friday night and making me believe in the power of film and story again. And reminding me what it was like when I first read this fantastic book.

If you have a romantic bone in your body I urge you to go see this film. The Trailer does not do it justice.

Posted by Wendy Clubb at 10:47 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:35 pm

http://filmeeting.com/movie-review-jane-eyre-shakes-dazzles-audience/

Movie Review: ‘Jane Eyre’ shakes, dazzles audience
Posted in Drama
02May

By Ryan Michaels, Special Writer

Hey, I’m Ryan Michaels, a 14-year-old essay film reviews for Heritage Newspapers. I’ve been doing it for 3 years, and suffer it a lot. Here’s my examination of “Jane Eyre.”

Being a film left-wing and all-around humanities recurrent that we am, I’ve never deliberate myself utterly as prepared on exemplary novel as we should be. we review voraciously, don’t get me wrong, though you’re distant some-more approaching to locate me reading an Eggers or a Wallace than an Austen or a Joyce.

I usually cruise this small aside value pity since I’m reviewing “Jane Eyre.” Considered a member of a essential British literary criterion — a existence of that is a small unhappy though a small easier to know what to review — it’s one of a monolithic terrors that I’ve been prolonged wakeful of nonetheless always eluded it.

Put bluntly, a poetry in that it’s created scares me off, terribly. So conference of this cinematic adaptation, we was vehement to see this mythological story told in a denunciation we cruise myself smooth in: Cinema.

“Jane Eyre” is a story of a lady who falls in adore with an fugitive landlord by a name of Mr. Rochester in a isolated 18th-century British manor. This is intercut with flashbacks to Eyre’s childhood, in that a volatile suggestion was fake in her, when she was invariably abused by management figures. Thus, “Jane Eyre” is both a story of a lady anticipating accomplishment in another person, and finding a strength in herself she never knew she had.

Directed by second-time-filmmaker Cary Fukanaga, “Jane Eyre” filmed with an eye that adapts depending on what mood it’s perplexing to convey. It’s utterly a change of gait deliberation Fukanaga’s initial work, a glorious Spanish-language crime drama, “Sin Nombre.” But they’re destined really similarly, with mostly naturalistic lighting and delayed paces. Basically, Fukanaga adapts a source element with his possess particular style, that goes a prolonged approach toward creation it involving and relevant.

Mia Wasikowska, in her second purpose as an iconic literary impression in as many years — a initial being a artistic black-hole “Alice in Wonderland” — brings depth, impression and essence to Jane Eyre. That said, it’s one of my favorite actors who totally floored me here: Michael Fassbender, of “Hunger” and “Inglourious Basterds,” who, as Mr. Rochester, delivers what might be one of his best performances. He brings an eerieness to a impression during a outset, though usually as Eyre finds a really real, tellurian core to him, Fassbender finds it for his character.

The film is surrounded by beautiful sets and Oscar-worthy costumes, though I’m flattering certain we approaching that already. If there’s an emanate with a film, it’s that a inter-cutting between Eyre’s past and benefaction feels some-more than a small clunky and different during times. Luckily, that’s usually for about a initial third of a film, and it settles into a nice, healthy gait after a while.

I’m not certain either being means to consider “Jane Eyre” eccentric of pre-conceived notions was for improved or for worse – we was compelled and astounded by a material, though how can we know if it was finished justice?

Either way, “Jane Eyre” is a film one can remove themselves in, rising some-more than a small jarred though some-more than a small dazzled.

I give it 3.5 out of 4 stars.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:38 pm

http://nycyouarehere.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre-2011.html

Sunday, May 1, 2011
Jane Eyre 2011

This story has been done this way and that for years and years. Its been used over and over for film and other theatrical endeavors. This new Jane Eyre is darker then most with a Gothic atmosphere. This is a romance told with a gray background. As the young Jane grows up to be a quiet and passionate women. The Brooding Anti-hero lead character Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender) lives a strange life that builds into a tragic tale of woe and Misfortune. Within all this is a love story that the young actress Mia Wasikowska was born to play. Her eyes and calm, yet expressive way of filling the title role give this Eyre a real presence. BBC and Focus Features come together to give us this vary new adaptation of Jane Eyre that is as grim as it is romantic.

Posted by gratefulquinn at 9:22 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Mon May 02, 2011 4:39 pm

http://www.krisjacque.com/blog/archives/2011/05/sunday-movie-roundup-05012011.php

Jane Eyre (2011)

I can't resist a period drama, nor can I resist films featuring brooding Byronic hunks. I've never read the book, so I'm not qualified to judge the film as an adaptation of the source material, but as a movie it's solid--not great, but enjoyable to watch. Everything is competently done, including the acting. Michael Fassbender as the troubled Mr. Rochester is both handsome and charming, despite the nature of the character's flaws. Jane herself is a charming character, too, played by Mia Wasikowska--convincing as a smart, independent woman who's overcome some very rough circumstances and come out more-or-less all right from it. There's some cliché that I think is fairly common in Victorian literature. The whole "even if things seem bad, everything shall turn out okay as long as you're moral" theme reminds me a lot of Dickens.

Also of interest: Jamie Bell, who plays St. John Rivers, a minister, also played the lead in Dear Wendy, a Lars von Trier film that I totally love.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Tue May 03, 2011 7:51 pm

http://aperturecinema.blogspot.com/2011/05/fun-with-rochester-and-jane.html

Monday, May 2, 2011
Fun with Rochester and Jane

Hello high schoolers (I'm including those of us who wish we could go back) - have a book report due tomorrow? Then I really can't think of a better book to pick up than Jane Eyre. Why? Is there a book that's been made into a movie more? Well, yes, but this one's gone the big and little screen route. And more importantly it's playing at a/perture right now. Normally when I hear titles like Wuthering Heights or anything that Emma Thompson's been in, I run for the hills or hope Lawren will want to see said movie with her mom, but this version of Jane Eyre has been a little different. Cary Fukunaga, the man behind the camera for Sin Nombre? Yes please. Michael Fassbender, that inglorious basterd who will be playing Magneto in the new X-Men movie and graced our screen in Fish Tank? Double yes. And Mia Wasikowska, the alright kid who went a little trippy in Alice in Wonderland. If there was a Golden Globe for crew with last names most fun to say out loud, this group would be a shoo-in.

Okay, we all know the story, or at least we're supposed to, since I have reportedly read this book about three times. But just in case, here's two cliff notes versions of the film, and why you should see it, one from Roger Ebert and the other that appeared in Relish this past week. Visually stunning, here's a taste of the movie that had the highest specialty debut of 2011:

Posted by aperture cinema at 10:19 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Tue May 03, 2011 8:04 pm

http://filmeeting.com/movie-review-jane-eyre-4/

Movie review: Jane Eyre
Posted in Romance
02May

Edward: he’s mysterious, uneasy and unexpected disappears for weeks during a time.

The lead female: she’s plain, from out of city and inexplicably intriguing to a large Edward.

No, this isn’t a summation of that vampire tale that has clearly consumed a smarts and hearts of preteens and their mothers for so many years, though rather a simple grounds of Cary Fukunaga’s film interpretation of that tack of Gothic romance, “Jane Eyre.”

Mia Wasikowska plays Fukunaga’s Jane, who is only as plain, bad and small as a classical novel insists she be.

Michael Fassbender is Edward Fairfax Rochester, too large for a book’s descriptions — though what womanlike spectator is going to protest about that? Their intrigue plays out opposite a backdrop of dusky Thornfield, an reasonably appearing structure that seems to guarantee secrets buried within.

In box we missed a requisite high propagandize read-through of a novel or forgot a Cliff Notes outline, Jane Eyre is a immature lady lifted easeful though unloved, initial by her aunt and afterwards by a eremite school.

She escapes this life by holding a pursuit during Thornfield Hall, where she serves as a governess.

The owners of Thornfield, Mr. Rochester, is a brooding male in a Byronic tradition.

Something is bothering him, though that something doesn’t turn plain until it’s roughly too late.

What creates “Jane Eyre” a classical is a strength of a pretension character’s character.

Although she lacks friends, beauty or wealth, she has a colourful middle life and a good clarity of tellurian dignity. Portraying these characteristics on shade requires a good understanding of finesse.

Wasikowska has moments when she captures Jane’s suggestion and her essence shines out, though many of these moments are still and fleeting.

For a many part, she seems flat, unwell to explain a passion that Rochester presumably sees in Jane.

On a other hand, Fassbender plays Rochester with only a right brew of brooding and manipulation.

His opening is most some-more pointed than a Rochesters who have come before him, that creates his impression harder, during first, to grasp.

He doesn’t scream and stomp around as much, and this creates him seem not as ill or undone as he needs to be.

Whereas Wasikowska’s understated opening leaves too many feelings and thoughts unstated, Fassbender manages to execute abyss by his.

A startling pleasure in this chronicle is Judi Dench’s take on Mrs. Fairfax, Thornfield’s housekeeper.

She turns a purpose of a stupid aged lady into one of a concerned, if not always, scold mother-figure.

Her somewhat stretched purpose lends a conformity to a film that would differently be lacking.

Fukunaga’s film does not reinvent a wheel, though it does give a 21st-century a possess chronicle of a medieval romance.

In a marketplace gratified with dim tales of adore and loss, it is a acquire further — a film with a heart as good as a brain.

— Sarah Smith
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Tue May 03, 2011 8:05 pm

http://shaktiparwha.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre.html

Sunday, May 1, 2011
"Jane Eyre"

Sir Laurence Olivier owned the role of "Rochester" in the original film version of Charlotte Bronte's immortal love story, which has been made, and remade a few times since then. But I found Michael Fassbender equally fabulous as Mr. R in this latest screen treatment. Needless to say, marvelous young actress, Mia Wasikowska, more than lives up to her well deserved reputation playing the (plain) "Jane" governess. The dialogue, which must have been taken from the book, is so brilliant, that I want to go back and read the book again! Jamie Bell is well cast as the Parson, whose family (two sisters and he) shelter Jane. Dame Judi Dench is memorable as always, as "Mrs. Fairfax," the Housekeeper for Mr. Rochester. Congratulations to Director, Cary Fukunaga, job well done! FOUR STARS !

Posted by SP at 6:57 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Wed May 04, 2011 8:34 pm

http://sunpeaksnews.com/spring-time-with-the-english-5728.htm

Spring time with the English
May 4, 2011 By Amanda Winters

It’s the quiet season at Sun Peaks. The tourists have gone home, and locals have hung up their skis and boards. Anticipation for hiking and mountain biking is running at a low hum with the summer season opener still a while away. What to do in the meantime? The low season is the perfect time to catch a few great flicks, either in the theatres or at home on your couch. Rave Reviews has sussed out a few new movies to help you while away a few spring hours: Jane Eyre and Made in Dagenham.

Over the last few years, I’ve been on a mission to get more familiar with classic literature. It started with the 2004 release of Mira Nair’s version of Vanity Fair, starring Reese Witherspoon. Nair’s eye for aesthetics and her pointed direction of the story made my jaw drop and as soon as the credits rolled I was out looking for a copy of the book. The recent adaptation of Jane Eyre, starring Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds, 300) and Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland), has whet my appetite for the Brontë sisters. The story of Jane and Mr. Rochester is a classic, brooding love story, but director Cary Fukunaga brings so much more to this latest film version. The shadowy cinematography, and the gorgeous locations (near Derbyshire in England) lend to some of the darker themes of the story. But perhaps even more appealing is Fukunaga’s focus on Jane’s development, as she blossoms from an impetuous young girl into a sharp-minded and independent woman. The film, full of heartbreak and redemption, is guaranteed to satisfy any craving you may have for a period piece.

If you’re looking for something a little feistier, pick up a copy of Made in Dagenham. Based on the true story of the Ford strike of the 1960s in England, the film tells the tale of the women who led the strike and brought about the first pay equity legislation in England. Sally Hawkins (Happy Go Lucky) stars as Rita O’Grady, the unlikely leader of the Ford machinists. Hawkins is perfect in the role, going from unassuming mother and wife to spitfire unionist in the blink of an eye. One of the best things about Made in Dagenham is that director Nigel Cole was careful not to romanticize the strike or the culture in which these women were living. In the short span of the film, Cole gets across the drama and heartache that these women faced in their day-to-day lives while they were fighting for equal rights. This is a great movie to watch with your teenagers, especially considering the current democratic climate in the run-up to the May 2 election!

While waiting for May flowers, pass the time with a few English roses and enjoy the peace and quiet of the shoulder season.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 8:36 pm

http://www.artlink.co.za/news_article.htm?contentID=27054

Feldman @ the flicks
Peter Feldman
05/06/2011 07:34:14

Peter Feldman: A fresh new version of Jane Eyre and a frightening remake of a Swedish vampire movie, Let Me In.

Jane Eyre
Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench
Director: Cary Fukunaga

American-Japanese director Cary Fukunaga has done a remarkable job in his screen treatment of the Charlotte Brontë classic by homing in on the essence of the story, eliciting superb performances from his cast and remaining refreshingly un-Gothic in the process.

It is stylish, elegant and it observes the period of the time with a keen eye and a fresh lens. Mia Wasikowska, who left her mark as Alice in the reworking by Tim Burton of “Alice in Wonderland,” inhabits the pivotal role of Jane Eyre with luminescence, while the handsome Michael Fassbender makes a commanding Edward Rochester who slowly warms to Jane’s many charms. He comes across as a realistic and prosaic entity.

But it’s Wasikowska’s reading of the title role, with its myriad nuances and moods, that wins you over, and when she penetrates beneath the skin of her character she is skilful enough to imbue it with profound textures.

The celebrated Judi Dench, as Rochester’s housekeeper, Mrs Halifax, adds immeasurably to the overall tone of the film and though her role is minimal she has an impact in every one of her scenes.

The story of Jane Eyre is a passionate, uncompromising romance, but it also serves as a wild, icy-layered tale about destruction, madness and loss. The strength of Fukunaga’s production is that it manages to capture its divided spirit like few of the numerous Jane Eyre creations of the past and is enhanced by its visual splendour and a strong sense of direction.

The task of translating a beloved work of classical literature was certainly a daunting one, but what Fukunaga has produced here is not, thankfully, a radical updating of the story. Nor is it a stuffy, middle-class study of morality. It is a vigorous, compelling interpretation that works splendidly on all levels.

The film opens with Jane Eyre fleeing Thornfield House, where she works as a governess for the wealthy Edward Rochester, and ends up at the home of a widowed Reverend (Jamie Bell) who gives her shelter. While recuperating with his family, Jane has time to reflect upon the people and emotions that have defined her and it becomes clear that the isolated and imposing residence of her former employer– and his coldness – had sorely tested her resilience. She must now act decisively to secure her own future and come to terms with the past that haunts her – and the terrible secret that Edward Rochester is hiding and which she has uncovered.

“Jane Eyre” is highly recommended.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:08 pm

http://marieclairvoyant.com/travel/plugged-in/what-to-watch-this-weekend

What to Watch this Weekend
by Melissa Attridge

If you’re looking for a movie to watch this weekend Jane Eyre is opening tonight. In this version of Charlotte Bronte’s classic Jane and Rochester are played Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, while the fabulous Judi Dench plays Mrs Fairfax. Watch out for a grown up Jamie Bell who plays St John Rivers.

Have a look at the trailer and see what you think.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:10 pm

http://bsmknighterrant.org/reviews/movie-reviews/2011/05/06/jane-eyre-a-brilliant-adaptation/

“Jane Eyre” a brilliant adaptation
Jane Eyre

The beautiful landscape and the intimate interactions between the characters creates an enchanting and haunting feel in the latest "Jane Eyre" film adaptation.

Our Rating: 4/5

As plain and simple as she may appear, Mia Wasikowska successfully gets across Jane’s great ambition, wit, and conviction as well as her modesty and shyness.

Mikayla Coulombe, Staff Writer
May 6, 2011
Filed under a&e featured, Movie Reviews

For “Jane Eyre” junkies: if you can get past the plot shortage (only the BBC adaption has been praised for keeping true to Charlotte Bronte’s original) and the slightly uncharacteristic Hollywood good looks of Mia Wasikowska (Jane) and Michael Fassbender (Mr. Rochester), then this movie will be incredibly enjoyable and well worth it, with a clear and spectacular vision of Bronte’s novel from director Cary Fukanaga.

“Jane Eyre,” written by Charlotte Bronte and set in the 1800’s, tells the story of an orphaned girl dubbed as deceitful and hell-bound by her cruel aunt. She therefore takes on the task of making a name for herself and living a full life despite the barriers of feminism and physical appearance along the way running into a haunted mansion, its temperamental master, and a very persistent saint.

Plainly and simply put: Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender are phenomenal. Wasikowska, after having had a huge year as Alice in “Alice and Wonderland” and Joni in “The Kids Are Alright,” puts up by far her best performance. As plain and simple as she may appear, she successfully gets across Jane’s great ambition, wit, and conviction as well as her modesty and shyness at times.

Fassbender, on the other hand, was a great candidate for the stubborn, impatient, and rough Rochester after his roles in “Inglorious Bastards,” “300,” and others. Yet along with bringing out his distasteful qualities, Fassbender shows off Rochester’s sensitive and compassionate side just as well—the contrast in his character bringing out a very strong performance.

And we can’t forget the supporting roles, Judi Dench (Mrs. Fairfax) delivers as always, Jamie Bell (St. John Rivers) embraces his role, and Romy Settbon Moore makes for an adorable Adele.

But don’t think this movie appeals only to die hard romantics; Fukunaga’s emphasis lies more within the character and challenges Jane faces and the mystery and pain she encounters than the love between her and Mr. Rochester (though there is plenty of romance to be sure). The beautiful landscape and the intimate interactions between the characters creates an enchanting and haunting feel which greatly compliments Bronte’s purpose and story of her novel.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:13 pm

http://theliteraryomnivore.wordpress.com/2011/05/06/page-to-screen-jane-eyre-2011/

Page to Screen: Jane Eyre (2011)
May 6, 2011
tags: charlotte brontë
by The Literary Omnivore

Jane Eyre
based on Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Despite the frankly astonishing amount of adaptations of Jane Eyre (16 films and 9 television series), I’ve never encountered any of them—probably because I hadn’t read the book until last month for class. But timing provided a wonderful opportunity for my class, fresh from analyzing Jane Eyre, to go see the film and see how it fared against the book. We went as an optional field trip down to a remarkably tiny movie theater here in Atlanta to go see it. Normally, I try and write my reviews of films pretty much directly after I’ve seen them, but I had to digest Jane Eyre. (This doesn’t mean a thing about the film—I adore Heavenly Creatures, but I also had to digest it.)

Jane Eyre opens with the titular Jane Eyre fleeing Thornfield Hall, before flashing back to her unfortunate childhood and employment at Thornfield. Orphaned as a child, she was left at the thin mercy of her aunt Reed and her son. After finally retaliating against John, Jane is sent to Lowood, a strict Christian school where Jane discovers, for the first time, her inner strength. As an adult, Jane seeks a position as a governess and finds one at Thornfield Hall, in the employ of a Mr. Edward Fairfax Rochester. Jane and Rochester find themselves drawn to each other, but the secrets of Thornfield Hall threaten to tear them apart.

As an adaptation of the novel, Jane Eyre elegantly trims any fat that might confuse or sidetrack a film audience; for instance, the fact that Jane and the Rivers are related is left out entirely, allowing her discovery that she is rich to feel more organic and realistic. While it can cut too far (St. John’s oppressive rationality is left on the cutting room floor), I found it to be a fine adaptation of events. As an adaptation of characters, however, it’s a different beast. You see, adapting a novel so occupied with the internal monologue is remarkably difficult to bring to the screen; consider Atonement and, if you’ve seen it, The Lovely Bones. You can spend as much time as you want on the events of the novel, but there is really no good way to place someone’s deep internal monologue on the screen without resorting to a voice over. It’s a gap between novels and films that takes herculean effort to overcome. I don’t like to say that nothing can be done well, but I’ll just say that I haven’t seen it done well. (Recommendations are more than welcome.)

Because of this, Mia Wasikowska’s Jane is brilliantly acted, but she rarely gets a chance to express the internal battle Jane fights at every moment between the forces of passion and the forces of rationality. We get some glimpses of it—the scene where Jane decides to leave Rochester is fantastic, and a moment where she fantasizes about Rochester finding her in her isolated home perfectly captures Jane’s attraction to him. But otherwise, a lot of it comes through connotation. Because I’ve just read the book, I knew what Jane was thinking and feeling—but a film adaptation shouldn’t come with required reading. As for the rest of the cast, they do their jobs well. Michael Fassbender makes Rochester abrupt and threatening, but also an intellectual man softening upon discovering his soulmate, and Judi Dench’s Mrs. Fairfax is lovely.

Visually, Jane Eyre is stunning—director Cary Fukonaga is also a cinematographer, and it shows. We get lush, expansive views of England, and the film’s opening, where a starving Jane nearly faints at the River’s doorstep after walking miles and miles, is deliriously lovely. I was quite taken with how the production plays with lighting subtly to refer to Jane’s internal struggle. (Though, to be fair, I was looking for it everywhere, since it didn’t seem to be in the film proper.) Daylight is harsh on Jane; nighttime is better, but still oppressive. It’s at twilight and in the shadows that she seems to be the most comfortable, and it’s only with Rochester that daylight becomes warm and inviting. The film also makes great use of Jane’s near-magnetic attraction to windows; Jane is always looking out—at the horizon, watching for Rochester, making herself aware. I also have to mention the costumes; Wasikowska’s severe beauty is downplayed, but Jane’s individuality shows through in the use of patterns on her costume. They’re never solely one color. You have to really admire that attention to detail in a film; I wish every creative artist paid that much attention. But with the internal heart of the story so cloaked, Jane Eyre leaves you wanting more.

Bottom line: Cary Fukonaga’s adaptation of Jane Eyre is visually gorgeous, rich in detail, and beautifully acted—but the problems that always arise when trying to adapt a very internal novel to a very external medium rear their ugly heads and ultimately leaves you wanting more. Worth a watch.

You can read my review of the novel here.

I saw this in theaters.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:15 pm

http://rampantcinephile.wordpress.com/2011/05/05/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

Keeping with the gritty realism present in most of today’s cinema, Cary Fukunaga saves the tale of Jane Eyre from a soppy romantic depiction, and throws it headlong into the darkness. The story is a simple one, and follows the life of Jane Eyre, an intelligent, plain and chronically mistreated governess who lands a job in the house of rich Mr. Rochester. These two seemingly polar opposites eventually form a budding romance which is overshadowed by a tragic mystery that haunts the halls. Fukunaga proves a capable director, setting the dark tone for the film, focusing on Jane’s inner strength and refusal to break over the many hardships she has endured throughout her life. Although this is one of many interpretations, the newest version of Jane Eyre feels fresh and brings a new liveliness to Charlotte Bronte’s well known tale. Given the amount of source material screenwriter Moira Buffini has to work with she is able to produce a fantastic script that tracks the action of this film mainly through flashbacks. Key moments in Jane’s life are highlighted to better understand her character but are not dwelled upon, leaving more time to focus on her interactions with characters such as Mr. Rochester and St. John. The pacing of the film is well measured, and audiences are provided with an engaging story and beautiful portrayals of Bronte’s timeless characters. Although Fukunaga and Buffini’s Jane (Mia Wasikowska) and Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender) prove to be far more attractive versions than their literary counterparts, both actors nail the soul of their characters with a studied precision. Fassbender infuses his Rochester with appropriate amounts of brewing tragedy and eccentric charm. Even smaller roles are handled expertly. Judy Dench, a familiar face in many period dramas, makes a companionable Mrs. Fairfax. Jamie Bell, though perhaps not my first choice for St. John Rivers, makes this unbending character likeable. Buffini and Fukunaga focus the story less on St. John’s determined self-sacrifice and more on his role as a foil to Rochester and possible harbinger of doom to Jane’s way of life. However, the real gem of the film is Wasikowska who brings Bronte’s heroine to life, creating an intelligent, bold and strong willed woman able to face the restrictions imposed on her class and gender in 19th century life. It’s safe to say that this is one of the best adaptations I have ever seen on film, and for that reason I believe everyone should see it, as it would be criminal to ignore a story and performances of this calibre.
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:24 pm

http://robinmigdol.blogspot.com/2011/05/california-aggie-column-now-playing.html

Jane Eyre: Now this is a book-to-film adaptation done right. I've never read Charlotte Bronte's Gothic novel about a young governess and her mysterious master, but after watching this film I feel like I have. The old mansions and foggy English moors are moody and the story is dark but not without its rewards. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender are perfect as Jane and Mr. Rochester. If you didn't think classic literature could be breathlessly entertaining, think again. A
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Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 9:26 pm

http://tessurizaholthe.blogspot.com/2011/05/dennis-lehane-roth-jane-eyre-and-miette.html

JANE EYRE – Starring Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, The Kids are All right) and Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Bastards—I love that line when they find out he’s not German and he has one last drink---“Well, if this is it, old boy, I hope you don't mind I go out speaking the Queen's”) The chemistry between Wasikowska and Fassbender, er----Jane and Rochester is electric.

Wasikowska is riveting in her quiet, elegant, plain-Jane beauty. Fassbender is exquisitely unpredictable, menacing. Their repartee was a perfect chess match.
Spoiler coming----I wished they hadn’t left out the Fortune Teller scene from the book---I’m just a sucker for séances and fortune telling scenes. I never grow tired of them. If you haven’t read the book I don’t want to give too much away. My husband wanted me to set up the movie for him, but in this case I told him, “Setting up the story is to tell you the whole movie. It’s Jane’s life.” So just go see it. The actress who plays Jane as a child also deserves credit.
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