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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

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Post by Admin on Mon May 23, 2011 5:41 pm

http://fantasmagoriese.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre-upcomming-movie.html

Monday, May 23, 2011
Jane Eyre - Upcomming movie
Posted by Niecole at 3:39:00 PM
In "celebration" of the upcomming Jane Eyre movie I thought I'd do a post about it.

Many of you might have read the book or seen a previous movie about it, but for those of you (like me) have not done either, maybe this will make you a little excited and you'll either go see the movie or read the book.

I recently picked up a copy of the book and I'm going to start reading soon. I'm also very much looking forward to watching the movie when it shows in my country...

Cast:

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre

Michael Fassbender as Edward Fairfax Rochester
Jamie Bell as St. John Rivers
Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax
Sally Hawkins as Mrs. Reed
Imogen Poots as Blanche Ingram
Sophie Ward as Lady Ingram
Holliday Grainger as Diana Rivers
Tamzin Merchant as Mary Rivers
Romy Settbon Moore as Adele
Amelia Clarkson as Young Jane Eyre
Freya Parks as Helen Burns
Harry Lloyd as Richard Mason
Valentina Cervi as Bertha Antoinetta Mason

Story:

Charlotte Bronte's impassioned novel is the love story of Jane Eyre, a plain yet spirited governess, and her arrogant, brooding Mr. Rochester. Published in 1847, under the pseudonym of Currer Bell, the book heralded a new kind of heroine--one whose virtuous integrity, keen intellect and tireless perseverance broke through class barriers to win equal stature with the man she loved. Hailed by William Makepeace Thackeray as "the masterwork of great genius," Jane Eyre is still regarded, over a century later, as one of the finest novels in English literature.
Synopsis of the movie:

In a bold new feature version of Jane Eyre, director Cary Joji Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) infuse a contemporary immediacy into Charlotte Brontë’s timeless, classic story. Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds) star in the iconic lead roles of the romantic drama, the heroine of which continues to inspire new generations of devoted readers and viewers.

In the 19th Century-set story, Jane Eyre (played by Ms. Wasikowska) suddenly flees Thornfield Hall, the vast and isolated estate where she works as a governess for Adèle Varens, a child under the custody of Thornfield’s brooding master, Edward Rochester (Mr. Fassbender). The imposing residence – and Rochester’s own imposing nature – have sorely tested her resilience. With nowhere else to go, she is extended a helping hand by clergyman St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell of Focus Features’ The Eagle) and his family. As she recuperates in the Rivers’ Moor House and looks back upon the tumultuous events that led to her escape, Jane wonders if the past is ever truly past…

Aged 10, the orphaned Jane (played by Amelia Clarkson) is mistreated and then cast out of her childhood home Gateshead by her cruel aunt, Mrs. Reed (Golden Globe Award winner Sally Hawkins). Consigned to the charity school Lowood, Jane encounters further harsh treatment but receives an education and meets Helen Burns (Freya Parks), a poor child who impresses Jane as a soulful and contented person. The two become firm friends. When Helen falls fatally ill, the loss devastates Jane, yet strengthens her resolve to stand up for herself and make the just choices in life.


As a teenager, Jane arrives at Thornfield. She is treated with kindness and respect by housekeeper Mrs. Fairfax (Academy Award winner Judi Dench). Jane’s interest is piqued by Rochester, who engages her in games of wit and storytelling, and divulges to her some of his innermost thoughts. But his dark moods are troubling to Jane, as are strange goings-on in the house – especially the off-limits attic. She dares to intuit a deep connection with Rochester, and she is not wrong; but once she uncovers the terrible secret that he had hoped to hide from her forever, she flees, finding a home with the Rivers family. When St. John Rivers makes Jane a surprising proposal, she realizes that she must return to Thornfield – to secure her own future and finally, to conquer what haunts both her and Rochester.

So now I'd like to know, who of you have read the book? Or seen the Movie? Or both?

Do you think its worth reading?
Is it one of those classics that everyone should read or not?

Give your opinion, no matter what it is...
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Post by Admin on Mon May 23, 2011 5:41 pm

http://mebertreviews.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre-2011.html

May 23, 2011
Jane Eyre (2011)
While watching director Cary Fukunaga's film version of Charlotte Bronte's Gothic romance Jane Eyre I thought to myself, this must be what it felt like to watch movies before the internet started spoiling all of the juicy parts. This must be what it feels like to be surprised by a film!

My own jaded familiarity with the story and its overabundance of directorial stabs at filmic renditions have caused me to be genuinely shocked by...well, by the audience's genuine shock when this classic story's secrets are laid bare.

How refreshing to hear gasps and to see gaping mouths in the presence of the novel's 12th adaptation. It puts to rest any question as to whether or not Fukunaga and screenwriter Moira Buffini did Bronte justice; especially since this particular story seems on the brink of cliche these days. A young governess (played in this film by Mia Wasikowska) falls in love with her older, surly employer named Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbinder plays him with a balance of sarcasm, gruff, and tenderness upon which all future Rochester's will be judged---yes, there undoubtedly will be future versions), but their love for one another is haunted by a secret that in the 1800's was considered socially, morally, and religiously fatal.

Let's face it, the babysitter falling for the man of the house isn't exactly unheard of. This film's backwards-working plot and exceptionally stylized cinematography saves the story from going stale. Wide-angled, sweeping shots of a destitute Jane wondering the bucolic English moors commence the film, and we are told her life story and love affair through cunning flashbacks. Working backwards accounts for the extra-shocked audience as it adds mystery to the tale.

Fukunaga and editor Melanie Oliver deftly juxtapose the images of Jane's re-account of her childhood to simultaneously create some dark comedy and commentary on the time period --when Jane is asked if the school she attended provided a thorough education there is a flashback of a staff striking a little girl's back and she glibly responds "most thorough."

Passion isn't lacking in this production's efforts. The scenes depicting Jane and Mr. Rochester's romance are gorgeously set-up: they meet with gnarled black trees and swirling mist framing their bodies, and the romance continues amongst symmetrically positioned Victorian furniture and outdoor frolics framed by flowered vines and cherry blossom branches bordering the scenes. Even Buffini's script captures some of Bronte's original fiery writing concerning her frustration nay anger at her inferior position as a woman (something rare to find in any adaptation of the novel).

The only thing lacking in passion is the couple itself. Chemistry is a fickle thing; either it's there or it's not. Fassbender and Wasikowska, although they give admirable performances, there isn't any heat between them -- even in a scene with a bedroom on fire they're about as urgent and passionate as Sunday morning churchgoers. Ultimately, since it is their dark, doomed romance which carries the film, it's imperative that Fassbender and Wasikowska's scenes work. But, in most cases, their pacing and timing are unsynchronized giving us the feeling that they are talking at each other instead of to one another; the scene when they first meet is a perfect example --beautiful for the eyes but not so much for the ears.

So while only a singular aspect of Jane Eyre is lackluster most moviegoers will find that it makes all the difference. If you want a thrill watch it with someone who doesn't know the story, and then sit back and let the roller coaster of reactions begin.

Posted by M. Ebert at 8:29 AM
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Post by Admin on Tue May 24, 2011 8:28 pm

http://www.c-ville.com/Article/Feature_movie_review/Jane_Eyre_PG_13_115_minutes_Vinegar_Hill_Theatre/?z_Issue_ID=11802305113408144

Issue #23.21 :: 05/24/2011 - 05/30/2011
Jane Eyre; PG-13, 115 minutes; Vinegar Hill Theatre

No plain Jane

BY JONATHAN KIEFER

You would not be wrong to wonder if it’s even possible to get fired up for a new movie version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel, which has been adapted into some form of motion picture at least once every decade since 1914. But this one, intelligently scripted by Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) and directed by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) has its own fire to spare.

Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) directed the latest version of Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska as Jane and Michael Fassbender as Mr. Rochester.

You know the drill: A headstrong teenaged governess (Mia Wasikowska), having overcome a really rotten childhood, falls for a brooding lord (Michael Fassbender) with his own dark past. The most important thing to understand about Jane Eyre is that she’s self-possessed, given all that has preceded her arrival at the gloomy estate of one Edward Rochester. This fellow, too, might be called self-possessed, and also a tad temperamental. As he and Jane talk to each other, most of the time in beautifully lofty language, they find themselves engaged in a mutually invigorating battle of wills. A romance between them should therefore seem inevitable, but also unlikely; in addition to the differences of age and social status, there is also that one rather important thing he’s not telling her. Hint: Is that a voice in her head or in the attic?

That Jane, said to be plain, and Rochester, said (by Jane) to be ugly, are portrayed respectively by the un-plain Wasikowska and the un-ugly Fassbender doesn’t impugn Fukunaga’s fidelity to the book. You can just take it for granted that these two characters have a long movie history of interesting but technically inaccurate casting: She’s been played by the likes of Joan Fontaine, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Samantha Morton; he by the likes of Orson Welles, William Hurt and Timothy Dalton. What matters most is the rapport between them, and with Wasikowska and Fassbender in the roles, it’s electric.

For any pair of actors, this duo is a strange inheritance. Taking Jane Eyre into account along with Fish Tank before it, Fassbender might be seen as settling into that peculiar niche, formerly occupied by Jeremy Irons, of the slender suave Englishman who seems always to be having on-screen affairs with teenaged girls. Well, power to him: He sure is good at it. Wasikowska for her part is as steady and alert as ever, delivering exactly the right blend of wisdom and vulnerability. Having abided Tim Burton’s ultimately shrug-worthy Alice in Wonderland, she finally has the classic reboot that she deserves.

The supporting cast includes strategic applications of Judi Dench, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins and Simon McBurney. The film also benefits from Fukunaga’s reunion with Sin Nombre cinematographer Adriano Goldman, who again shows a keen eye for the inherent expressionism of natural light—another means by which an old story comes newly to life. By being greater than the sum of its parts, this Jane Eyre should stay fresh for a while, at least until the next one.
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Post by Admin on Tue May 24, 2011 8:40 pm

http://silverscreenangels.blogspot.com/2011/05/gorgeous-new-period-film-jane-eyre-2011.html

Tuesday, May 24, 2011
Gorgeous New Period Film: Jane Eyre (2011)

In October of 2009, period film fans everywhere went crazy as it was announced that Cary Fukunaga would be directing the 2011 movie "Jane Eyre", starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, and Jamie Bell. Being the slow witted period film fan I am...I didn't really know about it until 2010 when I ran across a post featuring the upcoming film on one of my favorite blogs Enchanted Serenity of Period Films. I was ecstatic -- but somewhat worried! What if they slaughtered it like they have in the years past? It seems they always take "plain little Jane" and make her "totally ugly and stupid Jane", when it just says that she was plain. That totally ruins the movies for me. Or -- they take Mr. Rochester and turn him into some kind of flaming-at-the-nostrils beastie...with one goal in life -- to seduce and make out with plain little Jane. That gets me riled every time!

I must say that 1943 was the last time Jane was pretty -- actually gorgeous! She was played by Joan Fontaine (the sister of Olivia DeHaviland) and Mr. Rochester was played by Orson Wells. Sadly as lovely as Jane was, and as cute of a movie, it barely covered even a fraction of the book as it was completely Hollywood-ed over by it's all-star cast.

My favorite version up to 2010, was most definitely the 1983 mini series done by the BBC starring Timothy Dalton and Zelah Clarke. My sisters and I all love this version because of the fact that they stick so incredibly close to the book. It is the only version I have ever seen that includes the "Gypsey Scene" as we call it -- one of the most hilarious and endearing parts in the whole book. Of course Timothy Dalton is absolutely charming and dashing as Mr. Rochester, and even though I believe be must be a good foot or two taller than Zelah, they play their parts to perfection. Also, this version is wonderful because it actually includes the end of the novel (unlike the new one) and gives the full story of what happens after the fire (and it's so cute!). I would highly recommend finding this version (it is available on DVD).

Of course I cannot totally disclaim the other versions, as they all have good elements as well. Though I am not really a fan of the mini-series that was made in 2006, if you are a Eyre-Fanatic, it's worth watching...even though there was a lot of making out that definitely was not in the book! And of course...you have to get past Jane's face...which sounds shallow...but they didn't really make her very nice looking, even for a plain person.

The movie Jane Eyre that was filmed in 1996 is a pretty good version! I can't quite remember why it wasn't my favorite, but I'm sure it's worth watching -- especially since Anna Paquin (X-Men) plays Young Jane.

There are probably five to ten versions that I have seen, and all of them have a little something in them that I have liked!

Now, I know you've been waiting, so here is my report on Jane Eyre (2011).

Jane Eyre 2011
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench, and Jamie Bel
Genre: Period Drama / Romance / Suspense

My very first remark on this movie, must be that it was very very skillfully filmed! The costumes were typical, the buildings were typical, the places were typical, but the order of the movie was something completely new! Instead of starting out with Young Jane and her cousins, it starts off (surprisingly so) with Jane in tears, running away from Thornfield Hall. The story really starts in the middle, and then covers the beginning in pieces and flashbacks before covering the ending. I can just say wow. That's so new and neat, it pretty much moved the movie up to number 3 on my "Jane Eyre Favorites" list.

So, the order the movie played out was really neat and fresh.

Secondly, I really loved the fresh new scenery and that most of the places were filmed on location, and not just on sets! Lowood school, the Moor House where St. John Rivers lived, Thornfield Hall (and Thornfield after the fire), and the scenes on Thornfield land and the Moors, were filmed at different locations in the UK. While watching the movie, it was so very easy to get lost in the scenery with the long rolling green slopes and blowing grasses...the on location filming definitely gave the story breath, bringing it alive as we watched it.

Since I am covering my favorite elements, one at a time, I thought it would be so very unfair to leave out the music. Wow. The music was just...wow. So beautiful, so peaceful and flowing...it did not ever quite reach the happy level, but it is so emotional, so mournful and yet joyful! It's simply beautiful! (click on the play button below to hear one of my favorite pieces from the film!)

Now, onto the characters.

Young Jane: Practically always forgotten after the first 30 minutes of the movie, Young Jane (Amelia Clarkson) may generally be forgotten...yet this time, she is not. I'm not sure if she gets more screen time, or if she is a better actor...or if it's just the scene where she knocks herself out on the door (FUUUUUNNY!) this little girl does a very good job portraying the future Jane.

St. John Rivers: When I saw the list of the cast, I was afraid I would have ahard time seeing Jamie Bell as the hard-hearted and cold St. John after watching him play Smike in Nicholas Nickleby (2002). It sounds odd to say, but I was pleasantly surprised to see he played St. John to a T. Congrats Jamie Bell! You make a great jerk! Wink

Blanche Ingram: Blanche...usually the character we all hate for her snide remarks, her scowls, and her jealous nature. I must be honest, in this version, her personality was sorely lacking! She pouts more than she is spiteful, and you never really catch a glimpse of her trying to get at Mr. Rochester. She's quite passive. That was a little sad, because Imogen Poots looked like she would make a great Blanche.

Jane Eyre: Jane was played by Mia Wasikowska (Alice and Wonderland 2010). Mia played the part of Jane so beautifully...I think it is the first time I have really really liked the character of Jane (beyond when just reading the book). She was young, as she should be, and not stunningly gorgeous (but not plain by all means! -- sorry Charlotte Bronte), she portrayed Jane with emotion, and yet with youthfulness. One of my favorite scenes was when they showed Jane teaching Adele, she was sitting on the floor, cross-legged with Adele in her lap. For me, that scene developed her character more than most of the others, as it shows her actually doing the job she was hired to do, and it shows her really interacting and caring for the little girl, not just walking in the garden with her as they usually show. Jane was altogether believable and lovable, and yet you admire her too, for the spunk Mia gave her.
Mr. Edward Fairfax Rochester: Michael Fassbender doesn't just play Mr. Rochester...I think he must be Mr. Rochester. How do I describe this character, except that he is so perfectly who he is supposed to be? Sooooo good looking, not your typically hair-ape of a Rochester, so tall, and handsome.... Well, what can I say? Summed up
...I could look at him all day.

Altogether, the film was...
Wonderful. Romantic. Fresh. Old, but so new (you know, that tale as old as time thing?). Sweet, yet sad. And totally, totally worth watching! I would suggest you rush to your car, grab your friends, and go to the nearest theatre showing it, and enjoy a great girls movie night! Shed a few tears at the "Jane! Jane!" part, and talk about the cute kissing scenes for an hour after the movie is over...or if you are my sisters, fight about the characters for an hour. Whatever you wish. Just watch it! (And if you need a pal to see it with, call me! lol)

I hope you enjoy this movie!

Oh, and just one more thing...

*SPOILERS*
(to quote River Song)

The movie was fantastic, but I couldn't let it go without saying that they made two major mistakes in the film. First, they never clarified that when Jane was found and received the money, that it was discovered that the Rivers were her cousins. That was a whole chunk that was sadly missing from the movie. Boo. Secondly, they left out the whole ending!!!!!!!! What is WRONG with these people? I didn't really care, because I've read the book like a trillion times, but others are going to go around forever thinking that Mr. Rochester syed blind and so-on! Yet the man's sight returns in time to see his firstborn, his face gets better, and they live happily ever after. My sisters were furious and couldn't get over that. So, just a warning to you! (Oh, and of course like they ALWAYS do, they left out the Gypsy Scene...WHY? AGH!). Sad life. Enjoy the movie!

Posted by Little Lady at 1:29 PM
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Post by Admin on Thu May 26, 2011 12:07 am

http://knitmi.livejournal.com/156880.html

Jane Eyre
Charlotte Brontë's most celebrated novel has been adapted for film countless times, but this may be the first film adaptation that portrays the character of Jane Eyre as Charlotte Brontë intended. Mia Wasikowska is perfect as the humble, unwaveringly moral, and fiercely independent Jane Eyre, a feminist before there were feminists. Michael Fassbender is equally good as the brooding yet sympathetic Mr. Rochester. This film successfully conveys the cold bleakness of life in Yorkshire during Victorian times; however, it lacks chemistry and warmth. The spark that the love story should have produced is absent.

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Post by Admin on Mon May 30, 2011 4:02 pm

http://opinionatedjudge.blogspot.com/2011/05/two-stolid-feminist-heroines-jane-eyre.html

Tuesday, May 10, 2011
TWO STOLID FEMINIST HEROINES: "JANE EYRE" AND "MEEK'S CUTOFF"
I went to see "Jane Eyre" (10) with low expectations; I had yet to see a film adaption that captured what I found so compelling in the novel I loved best from childhood. The current version, with Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, does not disappoint, faithfully capturing the novel's smoldering passion, grief, and valor. If you've not read it, this film may inspire you to do so.

Like only the best period films, this one transcends the sense of modern people dressed up in self-conscious period costumes. Jane's world looks actually lived in, conveying what it must have felt like to run in a corset and petticoats and ridiculously uncomfortable shoes, or to travel by buggy across large expanses of the English moors, or to spend many of one's waking hours in dark spaces lit only by fire and candlelight. Social conventions that seem strange now are believably portrayed in all their intractability--the rigidity of Jane's orphaned circumstances, her dependence on the benevolence of her cruel aunt, the confines of her status as Rochester's hired subordinate. The best period films (about Victorian times especially) manage to convey social mores that now seem strange and needless in such a way that one reflects on which of our social conventions also qualify as self-imposed prisons.

The most significant and inescapable prisons here involve Rochester, who hires Jane to serve as governess to his ward. Fassbender (always compelling, and here especially so) makes sense of Rochester's gruffness, his imposing and mercurial moods. This man is trapped, has pulled out of meaningful engagement with life, convinced that real happiness and human connection is to be denied him. He toys with his money and social position only to acquire experiences that divert and distract him from his profound isolation.

In the world of this film, then, it is apparent why Rochester finds Jane so compelling. From earliest childhood, she displays a fierceness and a penchant for identifying the truths that are covered over by privilege and social convention. She is brave, declaring, at the moment of greatest childhood loss at her aunt's hands, that people view the woman as good when really she is hard-hearted. Jane speaks this truth with such clear-eyed precision that her aunt reacts to it years later as though the statement had been a curse. And though Jane spends the rest of her childhood denied all comfort and affection and devotes herself to acquiring the discipline necessary to withstand suffering, she retains her longing for beauty and genuine love, as well as her capacity to name what is true.

Thus, from the moment of their first encounter, Jane, though intimidated and often confused by Rochester, asserts herself, conveying a respect (for him as well as for herself) that goes beyond convention. He responds to her innocence, her genuineness, her unswerving courage, her piercing intelligence. He comments on the distance between the self each of them projects and their true natures, and with increasing directness identifies their essential equality, as Jane does herself. "It is my spirit that addresses your spirit," she says in a moment of anguish, scarcely recognizing or daring to hope that his spirit seeks to make a similar address but from a place of even deeper anguish.

This retelling is greatly helped by Moira Buffini's intelligent screenplay, director Cary Fukunaga's fresh eyes for the soul of the story and his attention to period detail, and the three performances at its center. The dialogue brilliantly renders a sense of daring in the conversations between Jane and Rochester, even as the language of each remains within the confines of Victorian restraint, and Buffini has cleverly begun the story at the end, with Jane's exile with the austere St. John Rivers, framing the story from Jane's lowest point in a way that makes sense of what went before. Mia Wasikowska perfectly captures Jane's gravity and fierceness, and Fassbender Rochester's tormented longing. And Dame Judi Dench is a perfect Mrs. Fairfax, simple and kind-hearted.

One comes away profoundly affected by the archetypes of the novel, its sense that real love requires vision, creativity, and courage. Love also requires self-respect, something Jane begins with and then acquires more of through the hardship of loss. She tells Rochester at a critical moment, "I would do anything for you, sir--anything that was right." Later when a desperate Rochester suggests a solution to their dilemma that is too far outside what social convention allows, she breaks away with the desperate comment, "I must respect myself." Her time with St. John Rivers helps Jane to move to a more essential sense of right within her circumstances, and to recognize that not all forms of self-denial qualify as right. That transformation continues to inspire me.
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Post by Admin on Mon May 30, 2011 4:06 pm

http://planesvstars.blogspot.com/2011/05/jane-eyre.html

5.29.2011
jane eyre
i have a bit of an obsession with classic novels by jane austen, charlotte bronte and the like. i read pride and prejudice about four times last summer. when i found out that jane eyre was going to come out this year, i decided to re-read the novel.

the last time i read jane eyre was in junior high. i also remember watching the timothy dalton version in the same class and hating it (i'm a wuss and it was too spooky).

anyway, i finished reading the book at 3am on thursday and requested adam to take me to see jane eyre for my birthday. we drove an hour to saginaw to watch it. of course it was not as good as the book but i thought mia wasikowska and michael fassbender were brilliantly cast as jane and rochester.

michael fassbender is a total hottie as rochester. if adam and i get divorced, i'm totally going for a manly old guy. haha. maybe not since i'll be old too! can you believe michael fassbender is our age (born 1977) and dates zoe kravitz?
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Post by Admin on Mon Jun 06, 2011 3:05 am

http://my.hsj.org/Schools/Newspaper/tabid/100/view/frontpage/articleid/446627/newspaperid/193/Jane_Eyre_Reinvented.aspx

Jane Eyre, Reinvented
Friday, June 03, 2011 By Madeleine Webber ’13

I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will- Brontë

Everyone always says, “the book is better than the movie,” however in the case of Jane Eyre I surprisingly found that the movie surpassed my expectations. I would not go all the way to say that it was superior to the book but it was definitely better than I anticipated. The casting was perfect with Mia Wasikowska (from Alice in Wonderland) playing Jane Eyre and Michael Fassbender as the brooding Mr. Rochester. The movie captured each character’s persona perfectly and proved their timelessness through their contemporary relevance. While several characters were omitted and some roles were exaggerated, these were insignificant differences and did not make the movie any less pleasurable or authentic.

The movie as a whole was pleasurable, but when comparing and contrasting it with the book there were a few noticeable deviations. For starters, the layout of the movie was completely different from that of the book. The movie begins with an adult Jane, destitute and wandering through a field while the book starts with Jane as a child living with her aunt, Mrs. Reed. This inventive structure of the movie is a minor difference, but nonetheless a tangible one that changes how the audience perceives Jane. Quite honestly, I actually preferred the layout of the movie since it made the plot feel more mysterious and uncertain, whereas the actions in the book felt much more predictable.

Other, more significant differences included the exaggerated role of Mrs. Fairfax, Thornfield Hall’s housekeeper. In Brontë’s romantic novel, Mrs. Fairfax is of little significance and at most has three or four lines. However, in the movie she becomes a notable character who constantly provides Jane with advice and misinformed gossip. Another difference is the portrayal of the River family. In Brontë’s novel, St. John Rivers and his sisters are much more reclusive and pious than the film expresses. Furthermore, in the novel, the Rivers are also Jane’s only blood relatives besides Mrs. Reed—a vital piece of information in the book. However, in the movie this relation was never mentioned.

With the exception of these differences, the movie ultimately followed the book accurately. The characters were the same despite the elaboration of Mrs. Fairfax and the exclusion of a few insignificant characters. The most enjoyable similarity was the movie’s script, which followed the book’s dialogue with precision.

Regardless of the differences, I found this movie very enjoyable. The director Cary Joji Fukunaga captures the desire, destitution, and secrecy of Charlotte Brontë’s Gothic romance. As well as preserving the themes of the beloved novel, Fukunaga’s cast perfectly portrays Brontë’s characters. Mia Wasikowska, 21, embodies Jane’s passion, honesty and devotion with perfection. Wasikowska’s small figure, tightly parted hair and reticence fulfill the essential plainness and frailty of Jane Eyre. As for Michael Fassbender, he impeccably fulfilled the dark, mysterious Mr. Rochester who has timelessly captured the hearts of readers.

The film is wonderful for both Jane Eyre diehards and first timers who are just dipping their toes into the world of English aristocracy. It was an astute portrayal of the ageless romance by Charlotte Brontë complimented by an avante garde approach by Fukunaga and Mia Wasikowska’s haunting portrayal of Jane Eyre.
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Post by Admin on Sun Jun 19, 2011 1:49 am

http://out-of-the-bag.blogspot.com/2011/06/jane-redux.html

Wednesday, June 01, 2011
jane, redux

Photographer: Laurie Sparham for Focus Features

I went through a re-read of all the 19th century romances that so enamoured me as a teenager with their Byronic heros last year and early this year (leading me to see Céline's fall 2011 collection through a rather romantic lens), so my interest was piqued when I saw that "Jane Eyre", starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, was playing in the theatres.

I enjoyed "Wuthering Heights" and "Pride and Prejudice", and of course, "Rebecca", but I admit when I read "Jane Eyre" at age 12 or 13 I was a little put off by how incredibly melodramatic the plot was (I read the rest when I was about 16). I think back then I wasn't quite used to 19th century literature; I remember I struggled to like Dickens.

But the film - directed by Cary Fukunaga - cast it all in a new light for me, especially on the character of Jane - she's more sober and forthright than I remembered. It helps that she was so superbly played by Mia Wasikowska, who has this luminous, subtle way of letting emotion flit across her face without overdoing it that reminds me of Cate Blanchett.

Mr Rochester, on the other hand, was exactly how I remembered him - charismatic, but kind of an ass. Michael Fassbender, whom I crushed on in "Inglourious Basterds" and was awed by in "Hunger", did a good job of not overplaying him - I think the subtlety of the movie as a whole saved it for me.

So I've dusted off my copy of the book and started reading it again, and I wonder if 15 years will change how I feel about the book.

Picture from nytimes
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Post by Admin on Sun Jun 19, 2011 1:51 am

http://jpknittingandstuff.blogspot.com/2011/06/sydney-film-festival-day-9-jane-eyre.html

Saturday, June 18, 2011
Sydney Film Festival Day 10: Jane Eyre

Do we need another remake of Jane Eyre - if it's this good yes.

Mia Waiskowski is perfectly pitched as Jane, matched with brave and deliberate editorial decisions by Fukunaga.

Opening with Jane wandering the moors the film is quickly engaging and uses her childhood as back story. Both Michael Fassbender as Rochester and Judi Dench as the housekeeper Mrs Fairfax are spectacular.

The film casts a strong spell and holds you till the end embodying the book and giving us a different vision.

I am a sucker for a good adaptation and this film delivers.

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Post by Admin on Sun Jun 19, 2011 2:58 am

http://historyhoydens.blogspot.com/2011/06/jane-eyre-movie-again.html

17 June 2011
Jane Eyre the Movie: Again

Charlotte Bronte's, Jane Eyre is turned into yet another movie adapted from the 1847 novel---and for those of you who haven't seen it, oh, what a movie!

I've always been a fan of Jane Eyre. She is such a strong, independent heroine who respects herself and has pride in who she is though she lacks wealth, beauty, or social status. The latest film adaptation of the novel is true (almost) to the original plotline and feels so authentic it would move even those who would not ordinarily be drawn into period pieces. The director, Cary Fukunaga, brilliantly cast Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre and Michael Fassbender as Rochester.

What an amazing pair. Mia Wasikowska looks at home in her corset and plain, business-like clothes but at the same time, exudes passion and moral character---there is a bright light behind those soulful eyes, a light that is impossible to overlook. Fassbender is effortlessly sexy---the perfect Mr. Rochester. One of the first conversations they have in the drawing room one night beside the fire (long before they actually fall in love) crackles with sensuality---I'm paraphrasing here, but he asks her what her "governess' tale of woe is, for every governess he's ever met must have one…" and she looks him straight in the eyes and declares she "does not have a tale of woe, she was raised in a house far grander than this one, and simply was sent to school because she was an orphan whose Aunt did not like her."

I could see the smile behind his stern look. And boy, how I wish I could write dialogue like that. Sharp, deep and with so few words!

Thornfield Hall is sufficiently spooky, but I wish we had seen more of it. I love castles and manors in any story. They are a character in the tale. I kind of grieve when we lose that house in the end.

Judi Dench is Mrs. Fairfax, and she is kinder to Jane than I remember from the reading the book. The rest of the characters were as rich as I had always imagined them.

In the end, Jane and Mr. Rochester of course, have an HEA (well, he is injured and disfigured for his heroic efforts)---but it's still a romance with an HEA. The only criticism I have of this film is that it ended without closure. It needed the last few chapters included in the book. Jane and Mr. Rochester are left in the film, just embracing. I wanted the last scene to be the one from the book where he regains his sight and sees his and Jane's newborn son (as happens in Ms. Bronte's original telling). But other than that, this is a must movie for historical romance fans!

Did you see this movie? What did you think?

posted by Kathrynn Dennis | 9:56 PM
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Post by Admin on Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:38 pm

http://fatin-rockstar.blogspot.com/2011/06/jane-eyre.html

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
Jane Eyre
i've been reading Jane Eyre now,and i'm head over hills into this.....and now there a new movie coming out...Mia Wasikowska played as Jane,and Michael Fassbender as Mr Rochester....cant wait...now i'm officially a fan of Mia+Michael....loves the story,loved it..and its gonna be mind blowing,i can promise you that!
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Post by Admin on Tue Jun 21, 2011 2:17 am

http://www.viewshound.com/art-culture/2011/5/movie-review-jane-eyre

Movie review: Jane Eyre
The latest film version of Jane Eyre (starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender) is worthwhile for fans of the novel.
By Särah Nour - Friday 03 Jun 2011

A film that relies less on dialogue and more on atmosphere as a means of storytelling.

Recently I had the pleasure of seeing the latest Jane Eyre movie adaptation, starring Mia Wasikowska in the title role. I knew going in that my love for the novel would likely prompt me to be critical, and sure enough, all throughout the film, I was making a mental checklist of everything in the novel that the film left out.

Overall, however, this one is nonetheless well-acted and beautifully done. Instead of striving for accurate representations of the events of the novel, it strives to capture its tone, essence and atmosphere, by way of haunting cinematography and the evocative piano score, composed by the likes of Mozart and Beethoven.

Charlotte Brontë’s novel was the semi-autobiographical story of the orphaned Jane Eyre, who survives a bleak childhood to become a governess at the house of the cold and acerbic Mr. Rochester. Jane is a passionate yet dignified individual who struggles with the class and gender roles of the era and her own sense of integrity versus her growing love for Mr. Rochester.

I must admit I had my doubts when I heard that Mia Wasikowska was cast as Jane. Jane is described in the novel as being “poor, obscure, plain and little;” in other words, an utterly ordinary and relatable character whose strengths lie in her personality rather than her appearance. My impression of Wasikowska was that she was too beautiful to play my beloved Jane, but on the contrary, Jane was placed in good hands. Through means of makeup and wardrobe, Wasikowska displays a modest, unadorned appearance, while her eyes subtly hint at the energy and fervor lying beneath the surface of pale skin, pinned hair and humble governess clothing.

Although Mr. Rochester is described as being a homely man in his late 30s to early 40s, most film versions I have seen have cast an attractive younger actor in the role – in this case, Michael Fassbender – and the reason is understandable. Few films would buck time constraints to include Brontë’s pages upon pages of dialogue between Jane and Rochester that illustrates the depth of their connection; movie audiences would wonder just what it is that Jane sees in this unpleasant, unattractive man. Despite these cutbacks in their meaningful interaction, the love story is acted out well enough to please both romantic movie-goers and fans of the novel, with Fassbender effectively portraying Rochester’s growing passion for Jane, while Wasikowska plays on the reticence of Jane with quiet dignity and understated devotion to the man who is her employer and superior as well as her love interest.

Indeed, Jane Eyre is a film that relies less on dialogue and more on atmosphere as a means of storytelling. The cinematography successfully captures the gothic ambiance of the novel, at times with overcast weather and washed-out colors, other times with sweeping mountainous landscapes with castles and farmhouses in the distance. One especially effective scene is Jane’s hike through forested terrain, where she meets a mysterious stranger on a black horse who turns out to be Mr. Rochester. The setting is reminiscent of just about every film adaptation of Washington Irving’s Sleepy Hollow.

While Brontë sought to connect with her audience on an intellectual level, director Cary Fukunaga’s intentions clearly lie on a visceral level, and despite the liberties taken with the story, the film succeeds where it counts. It may have left out key elements of the novel – scenes, characters, dialogue, subplots – but in a sense, it was necessary in order to get to the heart of the matter, without being bogged down by scenes that would slow the story down. Films and novels are certainly different crafts, and while I’ll always love Brontë’s novel more, I consider this an acceptable adaptation and an exceptionally well-done piece of work.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:21 am

http://confessionsofatfb.blogspot.com/2011/06/jane-eyre.html

Saturday, June 25, 2011
Jane Eyre

Director: Cary Fukanaga
Writers: Moira Buffini, Charlotte Bronte
Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender
Release Date: March 18, 2011
Length: 1 hour 55 minutes

Director Cary Fukanaga takes on yet another adaptation of Jane Eyre. You may be thinking “seriously?” How many times has this book been put on the small and big screen? There can’t possibly be anything different about this one. Wrong. The film tells the tale of eighteen-year-old Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska), a girl who at the start of the film has just found refuge in home occupied by two sisters and a brother in the English Countryside. With flashbacks of how Jane got here, we discover Jane lived in the estate of her malevolent aunt, Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins) until they sent her away to an all girls’ boarding school, where she suffered the death of a friend and constant physical abuse from her teachers. She then became a governess to a young French girl at Thornfield Manor, where she becomes a friend with the elderly housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench). Then, Jane meets the feared owner of the estate, the arrogant and handsome Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender). We all know how the celebrated romance story goes on from there. In a way to make this film unique from the rest of adaptations, Fukanaga brought out the “gothic” element of the gothic novel. The film was in now way turned into a horror movie, but there were creepy themes brought out of the story to distinguish it from others. The old mansion created an eerie setting for much of the film as well as scenes filmed during the evening with Jane in this unknown place. The sub-plot of Mr. Rochester’s mental ex-wife also added a sense of uneasiness among the residents of Thornfield Manor. Fukanaga creates a dark ambiance for the entire film including the romantic happy moments of Jane and Mr. Rochester’s romance. With cinematography, scoring, sets and specific visual effects, Fukanaga incredibly invents a new extraordinary kind of Jane Eyre that no one has seen before. One of the best things he does as a director is pick a phenomenal cast. Breakout Australian actress Mia Wasikowska of Alice in Wonderland as well as the Academy Award Winning film, The Kids Are All Right delivers one of the greatest performances in years as the young heroine of Charlotte Bronte’s gothic novel. She carries the entire film with such ease and strength at the same time. Wasikowska took on a role played by at least thirty women on screen, and completely made it her own. She took the audience on an incredibly close and personal journey by exposing Jane’s inner tumult without being theatrical. Every quiet flicker of the eyes and everything about this performance was captivating and proves her to be one of the best actresses of her generation and our time. Wasikowsa shared an indestructible chemistry with British actor Michael Fassbender. Together, the pair created a unique, almost interpreted Rochester-Eyre relationship while not straying too far from Bronte’s original writing. These two actors added such beauty and severity to this famous romance, it made the film truly heartrending. Fassbender previously made an unforgettable appearance with a small role in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds that proved for only a few minutes what an incredible actor he is. The legendary Mr. Rochester is supposed to be nearing forty and most actors who have played him are usually older than that. Fassbender was only 32 when playing him, so he added much esteem and mystery to his performance. He perfectly achieves getting Mr. Rochester across to the audience with his direct stare and strong yet revealing personality, while having a soft love for Jane that somehow fits perfectly into this hard character. With a growing career for both actors straight ahead of them, everyone can look back and remember when they brought us into one of the most powerful stories ever told on screen. The rest of the cast was fantastic including Jamie Bell as the stubborn young man who has Jane staying at his house, while he is greatly attracted to her. Sally Hawkins is wonderfully mean and despicable in her performance as Jane’s aunt who sent her away on unfair reasons. Judi Dench is, of course, terrific as the kind and pitied housekeeper of the mansion. One of the best performances in the film came from Amelia Clarkson, as the tough and tormented young Jane Eyre. This is one of the best, if not the best adaptation of the Charlotte Bronte classic and is by far one of the best films of the year. You are guaranteed to fall deeply in love with Jane Eyre.
Posted by Emma Seligman at 7:27 PM
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:48 am

http://blogs.coventrytelegraph.net/thegeekfiles/2011/06/x-men-star-michael-fassbender.html

X-Men star Michael Fassbender joins Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre
By David Bentley on Jun 22, 11 03:07 PM

AFTER his suitably magnetic performance in Matthew Vaughn's brilliant mutant prequel X-Men: First Class, rising star Michael Fassbender will next be seen in a new adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's literary classic Jane Eyre.

Mia Wasikowska, who recently starred in Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland, plays the title role in this new movie, released in cinemas on September 9. Also in the cast of the period drama are Jamie Bell and Judi Dench.

A UK trailer (below) and poster (above) have been released, along with a synopsis and cast and crew details.

Official synopsis:

In a bold new feature version of Jane Eyre, director Cary Joji Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) infuse a contemporary immediacy into Charlotte Brontë's timeless, classic story.

Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds) star in the iconic lead roles of the romantic drama, the heroine of which continues to inspire new generations of devoted readers and viewers.

In the 19th century-set story, Jane Eyre (Wasikowska) suddenly flees Thornfield Hall, the vast and isolated estate where she works as a governess for Adèle Varens, a child under the custody of Thornfield's brooding master, Edward Rochester (Fassbender).

The imposing residence - and Rochester's own imposing nature - have sorely tested her resilience. With nowhere else to go, she is extended a helping hand by clergyman St John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his family. As she recuperates in the Rivers' Moor House and looks back upon the tumultuous events that led to her escape, Jane wonders if the past is ever truly past...

Aged 10, the orphaned Jane (played by Amelia Clarkson) is mistreated and then cast out of her childhood home Gateshead by her cruel aunt, Mrs. Reed (Golden Globe Award winner Sally Hawkins). Consigned to the charity school Lowood, Jane encounters further harsh treatment but receives an education and meets Helen Burns (Freya Parks), a poor child who impresses Jane as a soulful and contented person. The two become firm friends. When Helen falls fatally ill, the loss devastates Jane, yet strengthens her resolve to stand up for herself and make the just choices in life.

As a teenager, Jane arrives at Thornfield. She is treated with kindness and respect by housekeeper Mrs Fairfax (Judi Dench). Jane's interest is piqued by Rochester, who engages her in games of wit and storytelling, and divulges to her some of his innermost thoughts. But his dark moods are troubling to Jane, as are strange goings-on in the house - especially the off-limits attic.

She dares to intuit a deep connection with Rochester, and she is not wrong; but once she uncovers the terrible secret that he had hoped to hide from her forever, she flees, finding a home with the Rivers family. When St John Rivers makes Jane a surprising proposal, she realizes that she must return to Thornfield - to secure her own future and finally, to conquer what haunts both her and Rochester.



Production details:
A Focus Features presentation in association with BBC Films of a Ruby Films production. Jane Eyre. Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, and Judi Dench. Casting by Nina Gold. Co-Producers, Mairi Bett, Faye Ward. Music by Dario Marianelli. Costume Designer, Michael O'Connor. Make-up and Hair Designer, Daniel Phillips. Production Designer, Will Hughes-Jones. Film Editor, Melanie Ann Oliver. Director of Photography, Adriano Goldman. Executive Producers, Christine Langan, Peter Hampden. Produced by Alison Owen, Paul Trijbits. Based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë. Screenplay by Moira Buffini. Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. A Focus Features Release.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:02 am

http://doodlesofajourno.blogspot.com/2011/06/movie-stuff.html


Jane Eyre



I loved the book. I'm a big fan of the classics. But as long as the basic story and "feel" of the book is translated into film, I don't mind some smart editing that may cut out a few bits here and there. And that's exactly what this film did.

Instead of plodding along, following the exact path of the book, director Cary Fukunaga played a bit on the sequencing of events and cut out some details that, although charming in the book, were not essential to the plot.

Imagine my surprise though, having been suitably charmed by Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre, when Michael Fassbender showed up as Mr Rochester. Two movies with this man in one week and really - he is the only thing that X Men: First Class and Jane Eyre have in common. But more on him later...

Jane Eyre was one of my favourite movies of the year so far. The acting was incredible. How to play Mr Rochester so that he is rude, abrupt and awful yet still someone that one wants to fall in love with is always a challenge, as is the character of Jane Eyre herself - how to convet her spirit without imposing our modern feminism on that time period?

Both situations were navigated exceptionally well. The drama was intense; the landscape ideal. The chemistry between Jane and Edward is beautifully conveyed.

Once again - it's not perfect. But to me (and maybe it's because I love the book so much that I tend to be quite generous to any recreation of it), it scored 9 / 10.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:33 pm

http://whatrobertswatching.blogspot.com/2011/07/jane-eyre.html

Monday, July 4, 2011
Jane Eyre

IMDB
First time viewed: Yes
Current Release: Yes
Watched With: Amberly

Love the Suspiria music in that trailer.

Now, despite being adapted about 200 times and despite my mothers strong affection for anything Brontë, I didn't know too much about the story. So when some tickets fell into my lap (Big thanks!) I jumped at the chance to go to this advanced screening, I really enjoyed it.

I can't speak for other versions but this one is always teetering on the edge of becoming more of a horror thriller but is constantly pulled back into the drama. I was dying for it to up the ante and embrace the darker side but it never quite got there. Still I should probably be grateful that there was any at all in such a period drama.

I didn't much care for Dario Marianelli's score. I really loved his work in Pride and Prejudice but this is a completely different beast. I did like the dark gloominess of the photography. They weren't afraid to make the night scenes look pitch black with only faint candlelight illuminating parts of the frame.

Mia Wasikowska is very cold and reserved as Jane Eyre. But she does a great job of showing us there's something going on underneath the blank exterior. I like Michael Fassbender a little better as Magneto, but he's great here too.

I think what threw me most was my preconceived notions about what to expect. The ending surprised me. I was a little disappointed it wasn't more tragic. As it is, it's not overly happy either, it's a little unsatisfying but I feel that could well change on repeat viewing.

On the whole, this was far more enjoyable than not. I think, like Joe Wright's Pride and Prejudice, it keeps all the period detail and language but feels much more like a modern film. That's great for people like me, who can find period drama a little stuffy in film adaptation.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:38 pm

http://aureabostel.blogspot.com/2011/07/movie-review-jane-eyre-2011.html

Sunday, 3 July 2011
Movie Review: Jane Eyre (2011)
by Tony Dayoub

Compared to the couple of adaptations I've seen in the past (neither of which I remember well enough to dwell on) the most recent Jane Eyre best captures the spooky dread of Charlotte Bront�'s Gothic novel. Between the previous adaptations' focus on the title character's early feminism and the romance which attracts many of the book's most ardent fans, the first thing to usually go is the story's eerie atmosphere. Not in this film version, though.

Restructuring the story as a flashback, director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) starts at the point in which a homeless, sick Jane (Mia Wasikowska), having deserted her governess job at Thornfield Hall, is taken in by the devout St. John Rivers (Jaime Bell) and his sisters. Once she recovers, St. John finds her a teaching job in the local village, and we learn of Jane's childhood. The orphaned Jane is sent to a boarding school by her cruel aunt (Sally Hawkins). There, the students are all mistreated by the headmaster, and Jane's closest friend dies as a result. Upon graduating, Jane takes the position of governess for the young ward of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender). Master of Thornfield Hall, he is a brooding, unfriendly man "given to ill-tempers," according to the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench). A bond develops between Jane and Rochester after she saves his life from a fire mysteriously set in his bedroom while he lay sleeping. Though class separates Rochester and Jane, this leads to the stirrings of a romance in both. But what are the mysterious screams and noises Jane hears echoing through Thornfield Hall late at night? Who set the fire? And what secret is Rochester holding back from Jane?

A great deal of Jane Eyre's success begins with the casting. Usually the pivotal roles of 18-year-old Jane and the much older Rochester are played by actors who are closer in age than the characters as portrayed in Bront�'s novel. By casting 22-year-old Wasikowska opposite 34-year-old Fassbender, Fukunaga transposes the romantic strain which (in the novel) arises from class differences to a tension stemming from their age disparity. In present day, the age difference is much more cause for ostracization than class difference is (note the impending nuptials between a British royal and a commoner). Yes, some may argue that young actresses are cast opposite older actors all the time, but the differential is more pronounced in Jane Eyre because Wasikowska, frequently cast as a teenager, looks even younger than her years, while Fassbender projects more maturity than many of his contemporaries.

Set against Thornfield Hall, in which Jane's naivete in carnal matters?her reluctant sexuality, if you will?is amplified and given life as the horrifying wailing of a fearsome "something," Fukunaga's version of the story finds the distinct voice of Bront� that often eludes other adaptations. If there's any flaw, it is that Jane Eyre feels rushed, flying from one important scene to another like a Cliff's Notes summary of the novel without giving even its most significant moments a chance to just sit and breathe. The twist upon which much of Jane Eyre's third act hinges is resolved far quicker than the buildup to it would suggest, to the detriment of the movie and the atmosphere it's cultivating. But despite turning in a noticeably abridged adaptation of the tome, Fukunaga deftly balances the inherent warmth of the story's tempestuous romance with the chilly darkness of its spine-tingling secret to forge a Jane Eyre that falls just short of being definitive.

Source: http://www.cinemaviewfinder.com/2011/04/movie-review-jane-eyre-2011.html

Erika Christensen Estella Warren Esther Cañadas
Posted by aureabostel at 13:05
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:48 am

http://southernbellestyle88.blogspot.com/2011/07/what-were-watching-june-2011.html
What We're Watching: June 2011

Jane Eyre(2011) with Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, and Judy Dench

Revisiting the classics as an adult (especially the gothic romances) can be so much fun! This beautifully made movie is a fairly accurate representation (though do expect it to differ modestly from the book) of Charlotte Brontë's beloved classic. The chemistry between Rochester and Jane is so charged it sent us back to the local library to revisit the timeless romance. Not to mention that Fassbender's darkly appealing good looks were enough to even send us back to the movie theatres in July to watch him in X-Men. Yes, X-Men! This movie is perfect to curl up with while perusing vintage books or magazines and sipping on an earthy Cabernet. Votre Sante!

Posted by Ashley Elizabeth at 3:12 PM
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:31 pm

http://www.halycopter.com/life/film-roundup-june

Film Roundup – June
Posted by Haly on July 8, 2011

A quiet month again. Watching The Shadow Line and, during the second half of the month, the new series of Dexter on FX kept me interested in non film related things. So this time round the total was 16. I say 16. As readers will see, there are a few doubles about to feature here. Maybe July will bring a more original selection of films? Who knows.

16th: X-Men: First Class (cinema) – I wasn’t overly keen on seeing this. After the abomination of X-Men Origins: Wolverine I was wary. Plus I wasn’t sure if I wanted to see all the X-Men young and pre-everything. Absolutely loved it though. Ensured that I left the cinema feeling a real buzz, the kind of excitement you only feel after a precious few good films. Really looking forward to seeing it again on Blu-ray. And Michael Fassbender as Magneto? Magnetic indeed! Wink Yeah I don’t know what I’m going for there either. Sorry.
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:36 pm

http://madsteb.blogspot.com/2011/07/movies-today.html

Thursday, July 7, 2011
Movies Today:
This evening Emily and I went to the discount movie theatre and saw Jane Eyre -- and may I say, it was lovely. Okay, I love the novel, it's been one of my favorites since probably fifth or sixth grade. The last time I read it was senior year during Brit Lit, so it's fairly fresh. Anyway, that is my background with Jane Eyre. The movie: I thought it was extremely well done. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender were both excellent. The tension was almost palpable, and they captured the sadistic, baffling flirtation really well in a fairly short amount of screen time. The novel is heavy. It's not light on details or subplot, and I thought the changes and exclusions that were made were reasonable and made sense within the mood of the film. Similarly, I liked the sort of flashback structure -- for a minute I worried they wouldn't show Jane's childhood, but they got around to it, and I liked the introduction to her as an adult, establishing the conflict she feels before we really understand the context. I don't know how well this film would work for someone who hadn't read the book, but as one who is familiar with the novel, I thought it was imagined and executed very well. Also, they legitimately made Mia Wasikowska plain. It wasn't Hollywood's ol' slap-some-glasses-on-her plain. It was genuinely simple and it worked really well for the character.
In conclusion: Jane Eyre, with Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, and Judi Dench -- four and a half stars.
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Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6 - Page 4 Empty Re: Jane Eyre reviews and spoilers 6

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:08 pm

http://www.ferdyonfilms.com/?p=10592

ane Eyre (2011)

Director: Cary Joji Fukunaga

By Roderick Heath

Charlotte Brontë’s classic 1847 novel has, unlike her sister Emily’s Wuthering Heights, thus far largely resisted attempts by filmmakers to transpose its multifaceted charms and subterranean perversities into worthy cinema. Whereas Wuthering Heights has received such memorable, sharply contrasting and complementary adaptations from the likes of William Wyler, Luis Buñuel, Jacques Rivette, and Kiju Yoshida, versions of Jane Eyre have tended to be disappointing and dryly handled. Even the seemingly perfectly cast 1944 version directed by Robert Stephenson, starring Joan Fontaine as Jane and Orson Welles as Rochester, doesn’t work nearly as well as it should. Perhaps this is because there’s something defiant about the novel, which possesses elements of, and yet does not give itself over to, the same hallucinogenic romance-noir atmosphere of Wuthering Heights, whilst balancing elements of reportage-like exposure and moral symbolism within its own insistently dialectic structure: it’s the work of someone in constant interior argument with herself.

Jane, Brontë’s heroine, is one of the best ever put on paper, a fiercely self-contained young woman who operates according to her own moral compass regardless of whether the world is in accord. The novel’s finale both fulfills and subverts its own gothic-romantic reflexes in a peculiar series of anticlimaxes with curious sadomasochistic overtones. The promise of another film version hardly set the world on fire, and yet this new adaptation struck me as by far the best stab at Classics Illustrated cinema in several years. It’s surprisingly well-cast, with two of the best up-and-coming actors in the business, and equally well-directed by the California-born Fukunaga, who had previously helmed the admired Sin Nombre (2009). Fukunaga seemingly made a great leap in subject matter in moving from contemporary third-world experience to well-thumbed library shelf filler, and yet perhaps not so great after all.

Part of the reason why Fukunaga’s film works better than other adaptations is because he decides on an approach of bleary realism, with an emphasis on physical environs and extremes, which helps give back to the material a grounding in genuine physical circumstance that is expressive without being hoary. The period rural England glimpsed in the opening scenes practically conjures a sensation of wind chill and ice burn as Jane (Mia Wasikowska) flees from Thornfield Hall into the embrace of a rural landscape that offers no sustenance to the outcast. The underlying paranoia of so many of the “classic” novels of the early 19th century is of the fate of the social castaway in a civilised land completely inimical to multiple forms of outsider; it’s easy to miss the often-shouted note of social protest in adapting such works. This Jane Eyre restores some of the immediacy and anger sucked out of most such adaptations through the figure of Jane, who tries to keep a grip on her Christian charity and also her outspoken honesty in circumstances where people try to subordinate one and destroy the other.

You can also see the influence on such writing looping back to its roots through the Harry Potter stories in the opening scenes in which Jane is assaulted by her spoilt cousin and, when she sticks up for herself, is exiled to the remote and gloomy Red Room, where she freaks out so intensely, believing the stories hurled at her by vengeful adults about ghosts and spectres, that she knocks herself out cold in beating at the door. The vision of Jane as someone driven by such an intense sense of justice and survival instinct that she’s almost self-destructive comes into immediate focus. This sits alongside the observation that her grim childhood (Amelia Clarkson as young Jane), which also includes being sent to a death camp in the guise of a school where girls, including her best friend Helen Burns (Freya Parks), expire from pneumonia in the parsimonious climes, actually arms her for future travails with an uncommon rigour, a fact she senses and forgives.

Fukunaga attempts artfully, though not entirely successfully, to downplay the novel’s loss of momentum in its long third act, when Jane finds aid and shelter with rural pastor St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell) and his sisters Diana and Mary (Holliday Grainger and Tamzin Merchant), by commencing with this plot point and using the licence of cinema to both disperse these scenes and retain their narrative meaning—Jane’s capacity for gratitude and perseverance, the way St. John subtly shows up the lacks of a more seemingly spiritual type of man as petty and narrow. It also allows Fukunaga to explicate Jane’s childhood and early experiences in fragmented flashbacks, allowing him to jump between periods without laboured narrative grammar, particularly inspired in one moment that reduces years of abuse to a single crack of a cane against her back. Jane is thus exiled when she falls afoul of her spiteful aunt, Mrs. Reed (an unusually cast Sally Hawkins), whose feelings of familial responsibility towards kin are easily discounted in the face of a girl who insistently mirrors back a lack of charity and decency. Jane survives her education and adolescence and takes the post of governess at Thornfield to school the French-speaking, rather daffy young Adèle (Romy Settbon Moor), and encounters ‘umble ‘ousekeeper Mrs. Fairfax (a nicely subdued Judi Dench) and her personal dark marauder riding out of the mist, Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Wasikowska, with an uncommon capacity to seem shrinkingly plain and luminescently beautiful from shot to shot, emphasises Jane’s innate decency with an edge of sullen, clipped, subtle resentment she tries not to let dominate her personality and hinted in the way she gives Jane a Midlands accent, rather than the “received pronunciation” for proper, educated English. Rochester is a difficult part to play, easy to push too far towards monstrous Byronic cliché or expose as a himbo fantasy. But Fassbender tackles the character with a blend of harshly honest force and pained discomfort within his own skin, with a faint edge of trapped bohemian energy and the intense hate of lies clashing with his beholdenness to a man who perpetuates one enormous lie to secure his future happiness. He’s both prisoner and driver of the steely rivets holding together patriarchal, conformity-driven Christian England that Fukunaga goes on to realise with effectively eerie scenes; Jane becomes witness to the manifestations of Rochester’s dark secret, the Minotaur at the heart of his personal labyrinth, as she tends injured Mason (Harry Lloyd). Hearing menacing knocks and windy whistling in a splendidly paranoid scene, Jane rides out the night with fortitude, remindful that, amongst other things, Brontë bridged a gap between Gothic and psychological fiction.

A similarly strong scene with a fine control of point of view comes earlier when Jane is invited to join Rochester’s toff friends, including his designated paramour Blanche Ingram (an underutilised Imogen Poots), and sits ignored and shell-like in company that cares not a jot for her, dismissing governesses as “detestable incubi … hysterics … degenerates.” Jane leaves, pursued only by the man attracted to her precisely because she sits so far outside the whimsical world. Fukunaga is nicely aware of the importance of physical contact in a world where it’s verboten in all but the most profoundly private moments. The scene of Jane’s unexpected appearance causing Rochester and his horse to take a violent fall. The sight of the squealing animal and the bellowing man tethered in toppled, flurrying alarm encapsulates everything dark and ferocious about the male sexuality Jane knows nothing of and yet gravitates to with inevitable, physical compulsion: Fukunaga then extracts a deeply sensuous feel from a moment as simple as Jane leaning her face against Rochester’s leg much later when he’s mounted on his horse, and at the end when she takes his hand when he’s been blinded, both moments alive with the profundity of human touching human. Such sensuousness inhabits other scenes where it’s less expected, as when young Jane and Helen share a bed, providing both with emotional and physical warmth. There’s an admirable sense of awkward, fearsome determination when Jane bitterly remonstrates Mrs. Reed before being cast out of her life, and when Rochester leads Jane to their ill-fated wedding with a sense of a threat as yet undefined. Their subsequent confrontation by Rochester’s lunatic wife Bertha Mason (Valentina Cervi) elides her pathetic beauty and captures with subtle framings the humiliation and horror transfixing the undeserving Jane.

If anything finally limits this Jane Eyre’s success, it is that for all its casting and stylistic strength, it’s still an essentially conservative and modestly aimed adaptation, straining at the limits of the tasteful period film but also conceding to them. The screenplay by Moira Buffini, who wrote Tamara Drewe (2010), Stephen Frears’ amusing riff on Far from the Madding Crowd, is, in spite of the reorganising of the narrative, still anchored to studious novelistic progression and point of view, to the extent that it even avoids portraying the climactic conflagration that destroys Thornfield. There’s a devilish perfection in Bertha’s auto-da-fé destruction of the entire infrastructure of the English country order she’s been sitting within like an alien, spidery presence, which deserves filming. This omission robs the tale of its fiery apocalyptic grandeur, obvious even in the second person on the page, and so that the film feels curiously lacking in a climax: it’s not full-blooded in a way that the most bold and aggressively cinematic adaptations visibly fight to achieve in different fashions.

We tend to associate classic novels with the classic cinema styles that inflated them like fragments of myth, for example, David Lean’s Great Expectations (1946). Yet Fukunaga’s mise-en-scène offers a sinuous, deceptive kind of expressionism, with its twinning poles of the frantic, handheld, opening shot and a sense of vertiginous plunging into the unknown, and the equally woozy, but tonally opposite, scene in which his camera and edits spin and jump lithely as Rochester and Jane glance off each other in a teasing game of attraction and repulsion and attraction again in a garden that erupts to life as if spring is coming only in response to their unleashed passion. Jane Eyre the novel is hardly a work of interior monologue and deep psychological investigation, and yet it is closely tethered to Jane’s inner life and her accounting of her thought processes, explaining both her severe temptation to accept Rochester’s proposal that they live in sin and the power of her determination to resist when it’s deeply against the grain of her personal sense of integrity. This sort of stuff is hard to get across on screen and part of what tripped up earlier adaptations, which endlessly stalled waiting for the moment when Rochester and Jane kiss. But Fukunaga’s relative success relies on his careful camerawork and on Wasikowska’s and Fassbender’s capacity to depict warring internal impulses in gesture and speak in ways that convey several layers of meaning.

Fukunaga seems determined to tell this story as if it’s never been told before, with a clear-eyed sense of where to stress the narrative beats, which is uncommon in a lot of modern adaptations. Jane Eyre is a good yarn, and he’s not afraid to let it flow with a natural confidence that avoids the academic or drearily faithful adaptation of a TV miniseries. There’s something a little unpredictable about this Jane Eyre, even if the ending is never in doubt.
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Post by Admin on Mon Jul 18, 2011 5:08 pm

http://latecall.blogspot.com/2011/07/review-jane-eyre.html

Saturday, July 16, 2011
Review: Jane Eyre
Review: Jane Eyre
Rating: ***1/2
Nonna's Rating: $$$
Rotten Tomatoes: 83%
Audience: 82%

After 22 versions of Jane Eyre, do we really need another one? Most critics consider the 1943 Joan Fontaine version definitive, but this one gives it stiff competition. It's a Jane Eyre for the 21st century which preserves the Gothic moodiness but offers us a realistic young Jane (Mia Wasikowska) and the sexual tension that clearly exists in the original novel but which has been systematically ignored in most versions. Wonderful performances abound in this film. Perhaps Michael Fassbender is "not quite" Rochester, but he comes awfully close. Not to be missed by fans of Bronte's novel and Masterpiece Theater.

Nonna's Ratings:
$$$$ = Worth paying the Friday evening price
$$$= Worth paying the Matinee price
$$= Worth a rental
$ = Wait for cable
# = Skip it
Posted by Donna at 10:40 PM
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Post by Admin on Mon Jul 18, 2011 5:14 pm

http://www.thesundayleader.lk/2011/07/17/film-review-58/

Jane Eyre…Romance Returns At Its Best

By Sumaya Samarasinghe

The film opens with Jane Eyre running through the grayish,frightening and windy moors. From afar, one can hear a voice shouting her name, which makes her run faster until the wind and rain leads her to collapse and lose consciousness on a hostile rock.
She is saved by a young clergyman St John Rivers and nursed back to health by his two kind sisters
For those who have read Jane Eyre, this is not the way the story of the little girl with a childhood “à la Charles Dickens” unloved by her wicked aunt and ill treated in a boarding school filled with sadists begins.
The film however covers Jane’s younger years thanks to energetic and well edited flashbacks which eventually lead to her dramatic escape from the eerie Thornfield manor.
Hated by her rich widowed aunt and harassed by her nasty cousins, Jane is sent to pursue her education in a boarding school where despite the hardships and loneliness, she manages to become a well educated and self reliant human being.
She may by “small, plain and poor”, but compared to the unhappy, rich and disturbed human beings which fill Charlotte Bronte’s wonderful 1847 novel, Jane’s proud and intelligent character makes the readers, viewers and of course two of the male protagonists fall deeply in love with her.
Like most women Jane is attracted to what is wrong and exciting, therefore to the cynical and dashing owner of Thornfield, Edward Fairfax Rochester who has employed her as a governess to his “ward” Adele. In the 1944 version of Jane Eyre, Orson Wells played Rochester and literally dominated the whole film. In this latest version Michael Fassbender is the impossible and unpredictable man. Fassbender is charismatic and charming and by staying a little bit in the background without imposing himself in every scene, he completely wins the entire public over with his effortless magnetism. He is a man who has “lived” and when Jane comes into his life, he sees a chance for redemption and happiness.Mia Wasikowska is probably one of the best Jane Eyre’s upto date. Her breakthrough role was in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland and she was the sensitive and balanced daughter in The Kids Are Alright. Wasikowska is far from plain, but her severe attire and hair scrapped into a bundle make her a very credible governess. Even when she discovers Rochester’s deep secret, there are no hysterics. She locks herself in her room and calmly walks out only to find Rochester collapsed outside her door waiting for her and her absolution.
In today’s day and age, the man would have probably kicked the door opened without patiently waiting with some burning candles for the woman he loves to come out of the room.
But then again Jane Eyre is all about unsaid attraction both physical and intellectual which seem doomed and forbidden by so many factors from age to social status and hidden secrets.
The fact that the love is so repressed and impossible makes it all more sensual .The book which was initially published in England in 1847 was titled Jane Eyre. An Autobiography and Bronte used the male pen name of Currer Bell. One year later when the book was published in the US, the story was described as an “influential feminist text” in the Penguin edition because of its detailed and exhaustive description of a female character but also due to the fact that Jane survives everything and comes out triumphant in every situation without ever generating a sense of pity. A heroine who came to life in 1847 but who has the same desires for personal success and love as any 20 year old would want today, this film depicts beautifully the evolution of a human being from a young and inexperienced girl to a confident woman.
The dark and gothic like visual sense in Jane Eyre is the work of director Cary Fukunaga whose 2009 film Sin Nombre about Mexican gangs is frequently shown on cable TV in Sri Lanka and should not be missed.
Every ingredient is present to make Jane Eyre one of the best romances of the year, costumes, castles, a touch of insanity, brooding heroes and virtuous heroines; this is an absolutely beautiful film which should be watched by all.
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Post by Admin on Mon Jul 18, 2011 5:15 pm

http://encorentertainmnt.blogspot.com/2011/07/am-i-machine-without-feelings.html

Saturday, July 16, 2011
“Am I a machine without feelings?”
Jane Eyre: directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga; written by Moira Buffini

My interest was piqued by the announcement of the recent film adaptation of Jane Eyre. I’ve never been a fan of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. Literarily it’s considered to be a bildungsroman, a subtle gothic, a romance and even a feminist novel. For me, at its best – and worse – it’s a tawdry soap opera which goes on for about 200 pages too long. But, I’ve always thought that good films don’t necessarily have to be based on good books. The two mediums are intrinsically different and as little estimation I have for the actual novel (I wrote a particularly scathing paper on it last semester) the key bits of Brontë’s novel does harness cinematic potential. And, so, I approached Jane Eyre not so much with trepidation but with anxiousness. Although Mia Wasikowska’s appeal eludes me, I’m willing to believe in her potential and Michael Fassbender is one of the most talked about actors of the time and with Sally Hawkins, Jamie Bell and Dame Judi Dench rounding out the cast my interest was, as I said, piqued.
The film opens with a scene that occurs two-thirds into the actual novel. Jane, in the midst of marshes that seem taken from a Wuthering Heights scene (written by the better Brontë) trudges along visibly shaken and on the road to being comatose it seems. She’s taken in by a group of strangers and with that we move to the beginning of her life. One of my many issues with Brontë’s novel stems from the inconsistency in Jane’s characterisation. Even though she narrates the novel it’s difficult to reconcile the random bursts of emotion with a heroine who seems essentially leaden for the most part. The first thirty minutes functions as a speedy sparknotes version of the novel’s first third. It’s a wise decision – in theory; really, the novel is so dense with potential plot-points (not all of them wisely developed) that it’s wise that Buffini accelerates the film towards the introduction of Mr Rochester.
For all its feministic ideals Jane Eyre is essentially a story of girl meets man, man is typically aloof, they fall in love, he has a secret she runs off and at the end they reconcile. It sounds bitter of me, but it is what it is. Its story is not a mellifluous study of class consciousness; it is a love-story and a basic one, at that. Buffini, though, approaches the material with what seems to be a striking reverence and doesn’t seem keen on making the material any less than Masterpiece Theatre – and it is not. I kept wishing for her to make the story her own, forgive me sounding like a platitude. Her adaptation is serviceable but it retains all the parts of the novel I find most vexing. Why IS Rochester attracted to Jane? And she to him? For a love that should be so striking wouldn’t a marriage of convenience to a woman who’s insane be such a tough hill to climb? And, if it was why does Jane set out to Rochester at the end still thinking that he’s married?
I suppose I could forgive my reservations with the actual story if everything else was flawless, but it isn’t. I know, I tend to get a bit tongue-in-cheek with my ebullient love for the Brits, and periods and I find it even more odd that I’m so reticent about this one which most seem to appreciate. But, I find Mia Wasikowska especially vexing. Again, I bear no ill-will towards the actress. I forgive her awfulness in Alice in Wonderland, but her Jane – though realistic in the sense of the novel seems too detached to be a functional leading lady and Mia’s constant Australian accent annoyed me much more than it should and it’s unfortunate because she’s flanked by two actors in particular who offer up fine performances. Mrs. Fairfax has never been a riveting character, but Judi Dench manages to find something personal in it. But, it’s Michael Fassbender who’s the real fine – it’s such a superlative performance that I kept wishing his Mr. Rochester could leave this film, and transport to another where his work would be better appreciated. It’s not that Fukunaga adaptations gets many things wrong, it just doesn’t get enough right for me to care about it. It looks beautiful, it's shot excellently and Dario Marianelli's score is falwless and true Fassbender’s brilliant, but something is lacking...

C+
Posted by Andrew: Encore Entertainment at 1:02 PM
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