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X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

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X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:58 pm

http://herocomplex.latimes.com/2011/04/26/x-men-first-class-star-the-history-of-mlk-and-malcolm-x-influenced-our-story/?dlvrit=57774

‘X-Men: First Class’ star: MLK and Malcolm X influenced our story
April 26, 2011 | 2:23 p.m.

Here’s an early look at my “X-Men: First Class” story from this Sunday’s Los Angeles Times Calendar Summer Sneaks issue

James McAvoy, left, plays Charles Xavier and Michael Fassbender is Erik Lehnsherr, the future Magneto, in "X-Men: First Class." (Marvel Studios)

How’s this for unexpected territory in a superhero film: “X-Men: First Class” not only uses the Kennedy years, the Civil Rights movement and the Cuban Missile Crisis as a backdrop for its retro tale, the movie’s story of two massively powerful mutants who struggle against bitter prejudice was directly informed by the complicated lives of Malcolm X and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

“It came up early on in the rehearsal period and that was the path we took,” says Michael Fassbender, who stars as the emotionally scarred Erik Lehnsherr, who will become the militant mutant known as Magneto. “These two brilliant minds coming together and their views aren’t that different on some key things. As you watch them you know that if their understanding, ability and intelligence could somehow come together it would be really special. But the split is what makes them even more interesting and tragic.”

The other half of the film’s “frenemy” pair is Charles Xavier, a.k.a. Professor X, who is portrayed by James McAvoy (“Atonement,” “Last King of Scotland”) who in this film steps into a younger version of the role made famous by Patrick Stewart in four “X-Men” films (and step is the right word since in this prequel the brilliant leader of the outcast super-hero team has yet to suffer the injuries that will lead to his use of a wheelchair).

The movie has a challenge with its throwback conceits and all the new faces (and the absence, in the credits at least, of Hugh Jackman, the most bankable mutant star). Still, the four mutant-hero movies to date have pulled in $1.53 billion in worldwide box office, and even when devoted fans grumbled about the story quality (as they did with Brett Ratner’s 2006 installment “X-Men: The Last Stand”) they still bought tickets and joined the Internet debates. The opposite of love isn’t hate, it’s apathy — and to date there has been no apathy when it comes to the X-Men characters, which created a publishing bonanza for Marvel in the 1980s and ’90s.

X-Men: First Class Vol. 2 No. 15 (Marvel Comics)

The new film also marks the return of Bryan Singer to the franchise. The director of the first two “X-Men” movies (which many observers credit with ushering in a new era of ambition for Hollywood super-hero films) left for the third installment and the 2009 spin-off “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” but he’s back, this time as producer. Matthew Vaughn, the firebrand filmmaker behind “Kick-Ass,” is in the director’s chair and has inspired plenty of studio angst with his public candor about the rushed production. “I feel like a boxer against the ropes,” the Brit told The Times in January. “I’m just throwing punches and taking them as they come and making sure I don’t hit the canvas.”

Less stressed-out were Fassbender and McAvoy, two rising stars who have plenty of special-effects film credits between them (the first “Chronicles of Narnia” film, “300,” “Wanted,” “Jonah Hex,” etc.) and a measured confidence as they inherit roles from fanboy-world icons Ian McKellen, who played Magneto in four films, and Stewart. Fassbender showed up one day on the set to find that the prankster McAvoy had replaced their cast chairs with ones emblazoned with the names of those knighted elder actors.

In the end, though, Fassbender said that going to the untapped past of the characters relieved some of the pressure.

“At one point I thought, should I study Ian McKellen as a young man, should I take that approach? Matthew wasn’t so keen on it and after discussing it we decided it might lead off away from the real priorities. Just returning to the comic books you find that Erik can — in terms of taking on a voice — Erik can be anything when we meet him. He speaks German, he goes to a concentration camp in Poland, ends up in Eastern Europe with Magda, has a child there and then sort of goes off to Israel. There’s so much there and I tried to approach it freshly from that source material and see what I could come up with independently. There is, of course, the hint of what Ian McKellen has done in the movies is there as well.”

McAvoy, for his part, said he was glad to go back to a version of younger Professor X that wasn’t the “selfless, sexless monk” of the previous movies.

Kevin Bacon as Sebastian Shaw and January Jones as Emma Frost (Marvel Studios)

The 1960s setting for this film, meanwhile, not only allows for some “Mad Men” fashion options (and January Jones from that acclaimed AMC series is one of the costars) but it makes this the first Marvel Comics adaptation that is fully set in the decade when the creations of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and others made that company’s name a true pop-culture brand. “There’s something special about connecting with that history and that heritage,” Singer said. As far as costars, newly minted Oscar nominee Jennifer Lawrence will play a younger version of Mystique and Nicholas Hoult jumps into the role of Beast, but there are plenty of new names pulled from the comics, among them Emma Frost (Jones), Azazel (Jason Flemyng), Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) and Havok (Lucas Till).

Still, at the heart of it all, McAvoy says, are Charles and Erik and the magnetic hold they have on each other.

“It’s kind of a love story, like ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,’ which, really, was a love story between two men. This is the first time in their lives they’ve met someone who is an equal of sorts, someone who understands them and can connect and push them too. Especially Charles, he’s fascinated with Erik and his potential. For Erik, Charles is the first person he’s trusted to really tell about his past and the first person to understand the horrible things he’s been through.”

– Geoff Boucher (Follow me on Twitter @LATherocomplex)
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 28, 2011 12:53 am

http://geektyrant.com/news/2011/4/27/new-x-men-first-class-poster-and-detailed-character-guide.html

Apr 27
New X-MEN: FIRST CLASS Poster and Detailed Character Guide
AuthorVenkman

20th Century Fox fails yet again in giving us a decent poster design for X-Men: First Class. Just another very poor photoshop job. The studios marketing team really needs to find a better graphic designer for their poster designs. This is just getting embarrassing. But the latest trailer they released was pretty awesome!

A new character guide has also gone up over at MSN, which features the actors discussing their own specific roles in the film. Some people may consider some of this to be Spoiler territory. I wanted to throw out a warning just in case.

James McAvoy on Charles Xavier:

Charles has this connection to everybody because he can feel their experiences and see them. Their memories are his memories. But he wasn't looking for Erik. He didn't know Erik was there and he suddenly felt him. And perhaps he's never connected to Erik in quite the same way he's connected to other people. I think there's a little bit of vying for who's in charge, and there is a feeling between them from Magneto that, 'you've got the brains, but I'm your trump card, pal,' at every venture. 'I'm the most dangerous dude in here, and you know that and I know that,' and I think by the end of the film we come to an understanding about that as well. We do have completely different views as well, and what's quite nice is that those scenes don't come to a nice reconciliation at the end. They're left, so the tension carries on through the movie.

Michael Fassbender on Magneto:

At the start of the movie we get introduced to Erik as a boy. We start in the concentration camps with him and it cuts to 20 years later and it's the early 60s and it's Erik as a grown man. He's on a quest to get Sebastian Shaw, played by Kevin Bacon. Shaw had him in these concentration camps - and as we know the Nazis were doing lots of experimentation with all sorts of things like measuring skull size and brain size and running experiments on human beings, essentially. Shaw is trying to unleash this power in Magneto - he's recognised that he can manipulate metal - and so we catch up with Erik on a quest to basically hunt Shaw down.

Jennifer Lawrence on Mystique:

Raven, or Mystique, is a shape shifter, and when she's in her natural, blue, scaly, red hair form she also has superhuman agility. She's young and she's a normal teenager, really, just dealing with insecurities. She's insecure about being a mutant and she slowly grows to really accept it and evolve herself. She's been shape shifting for a long time, but she's really just learning about her superhuman ability. She discovers that in the movie.

Lucas Till on Havok:

Alex Summers, whose super name is Havok, is Scott 'Cyclops' Summers's younger brother. I can shoot plasma beams out of my entire body instead of just optic beams. Just like Scott can't control his power without glasses or his visor on, historically Alex has never been able to control his power either. It's always in outbursts of lack of control. In the comics he has a suit that kind of absorbs excess energy. But it was more like a meter that told him how much power he had, whereas in this one I have something that channels it because I can't control it myself. It's a chest piece that focuses the ray so I don't blow it out everywhere.

Nicholas Hoult on Beast:

He's a young scientist - a very clever guy - but a little bit shy and awkward around the girls and just socially awkward around the group. He's a good guy, but it's hard work for him. He's a great scientist though and he comes up with all of these inventions that sometimes work and sometimes don't, and then he tries out a serum from Mystique's (pictured left) DNA to try and stop his feet from appearing apelike and massive, because he's very self-conscious about it. Unfortunately that goes wrong and he becomes the Beast that we know from the other films and cartoons and comics. It's fascinating to see the difference, when he becomes the Beast, between Hank and this very animalistic and scary-looking character.

Edi Gathegi on Darwin:

Darwin gets his nickname from Charles Darwin, the father of the theory of evolution. My character is in a constant state of evolution. It's called reactive adaptation - so whatever environment he's in, in order to survive he will mutate. If he gets thrown in water, all of a sudden he might have gills. The lights go out, he'll have 20-20 vision in the pitch black. He's the coolest one! What I like about my character's powers is that a lot of the X-Men have very cool powers, but with this one you actually see it happening and you see why it's happening. In the right circumstances you see the thought behind the character and the need to create that evolution. There's logic to it. And the possibilities are endless with good writing.

Caleb Landry on Banshee:

Banshee's got a supersonic scream, and he learns how to fly in this movie. He learns how to melt objects. In the beginning all he really knows is how to break things - car doors I'm guessing, things like that. And he's got selective hearing. In the comics it seems like they reinvent him over and over again. He's always pretty smart, it seems like. He's mostly good. The script definitely defines him more than the comics do, because I've got to do what the script says. I try to add as much as possible. I know there's a love connection in the comics with Moira, so I try to look at her just a little bit differently, you know, when I can, so for any of the fans watching, they can notice that.

Zoe Kravitz on Tempest:

Angel Salvadore is a go-go dancer who can fly. I have a pair of tattooed wings on my back, which turn into insect wings, and I projectile vomit acid. I get to do that a few times. She starts out on the good side with Professor X and Magneto - they recruit her to be an X-Man, and then she switches to Sebastian Shaw's (Kevin Bacon) side to be in Hellfire. I think it's just a different approach to fighting for human equality. Someone compared the two different sides. In this film it's Hellfire and the X-Men, but later it's Xavier and Magneto and someone compared it to Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. They're really fighting for the same thing, but it's different approaches for how to get there. I think she just believes that the aggressive side is the right side.

Jason Fleming on Azazel:

He's a bad guy. Kevin Bacon's got a team of freaky sidekicks, one of them being the fantastic January Jones, and one of them being the not so fantastic bright red Jason Flemyng, and also Alex Gonzalez who plays Riptide. And latterly in the film we recruit Zoe Kravitz as well. They're just goons, but my skill, if I have any skill at all, is to make something out of what on paper isn't too much. If I do a day and I've added a line or nicked a close up, I'm happy with myself. As the days progress, because it's a long film, I'm sort of happy with how the part is developing. Matt (Vaughn, director) keeps coming up to me and saying, 'Flemyng, all the second unit stuff I get back, you're speaking. You haven't got any lines - why are you speaking?!

Rose Byrne on Moira MacTaggart:

Moira works for the CIA. In the comics she's a genetic, mutant expert scientist, and she was in the third film - Olivia Williams played her - but in this incarnation she works for the CIA and early on gets involved with Charles Xavier, discovering mutants. She knows that he's an expert on genetic mutation, so she seeks him out and they become allies. She's a real pioneer woman. It's set in '62 and she's in the CIA so it's very new for women to have that opportunity. She's working in a pretty misogynistic place, so she's got a lot of guts and she's driven.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Fri Apr 29, 2011 1:42 pm

http://herocomplex.latimes.com/2011/04/26/x-men-first-class-star-the-history-of-mlk-and-malcolm-x-influenced-our-story/

‘X-Men: First Class’ star: MLK and Malcolm X influenced our story [updated]

April 26, 2011 | 2:23 p.m.

Here’s an early look at my “X-Men: First Class” preview in the Summer Sneaks issue in the upcoming Los Angeles Times Sunday Calendar issue.

James McAvoy, left, plays Charles Xavier and Michael Fassbender is Erik Lehnsherr, the future Magneto, in "X-Men: First Class." (Marvel Studios)

How’s this for unexpected territory in a superhero film: “X-Men: First Class” not only uses the Kennedy years, the Civil Rights movement and the Cuban Missile Crisis as a backdrop for its retro tale, the movie’s story of two massively powerful mutants who struggle against bitter prejudice was directly informed by the complicated lives of Malcolm X and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

“It came up early on in the rehearsal period and that was the path we took,” says Michael Fassbender, who stars as the emotionally scarred Erik Lehnsherr, who will become the militant mutant known as Magneto. “These two brilliant minds coming together and their views aren’t that different on some key things. As you watch them you know that if their understanding, ability and intelligence could somehow come together it would be really special. But the split is what makes them even more interesting and tragic.”

The other half of the film’s “frenemy” pair is Charles Xavier, a.k.a. Professor X, who is portrayed by James McAvoy (“Atonement,” “Last King of Scotland”) who in this film steps into a younger version of the role made famous by Patrick Stewart in four “X-Men” films (and step is the right word since in this prequel the brilliant leader of the outcast super-hero team has yet to suffer the injuries that will lead to his use of a wheelchair).

The movie has a challenge with its throwback conceits and all the new faces (and the absence, in the credits at least, of Hugh Jackman, the most bankable mutant star). Still, the four mutant-hero movies to date have pulled in $1.53 billion in worldwide box office, and even when devoted fans grumbled about the story quality (as they did with Brett Ratner’s 2006 installment “X-Men: The Last Stand”) they still bought tickets and joined the Internet debates. The opposite of love isn’t hate, it’s apathy — and to date there has been no apathy when it comes to the X-Men characters, which created a publishing bonanza for Marvel in the 1980s and ’90s.

X-Men: First Class Vol. 2 No. 15 (Marvel Comics)

The new film also marks the return of Bryan Singer to the franchise. The director of the first two “X-Men” movies (which many observers credit with ushering in a new era of ambition for Hollywood super-hero films) left for the third installment and the 2009 spin-off “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” but he’s back, this time as producer. Matthew Vaughn, the firebrand filmmaker behind “Kick-Ass,” is in the director’s chair and has inspired plenty of studio angst with his public candor about the rushed production. “I feel like a boxer against the ropes,” the Brit told The Times in January. “I’m just throwing punches and taking them as they come and making sure I don’t hit the canvas.”

Less stressed-out were Fassbender and McAvoy, two rising stars who have plenty of special-effects film credits between them (the first “Chronicles of Narnia” film, “300,” “Wanted,” “Jonah Hex,” etc.) and a measured confidence as they inherit roles from fanboy-world icons Ian McKellen, who played Magneto in three films, and Stewart. Fassbender showed up one day on the set to find that the prankster McAvoy had replaced their cast chairs with ones emblazoned with the names of those knighted elder actors. [FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this post stated that Ian McKellen portrayed Magneto in four films, but there have been only three to date.]

In the end, though, Fassbender said that going to the untapped past of the characters relieved some of the pressure.

“At one point I thought, should I study Ian McKellen as a young man, should I take that approach? Matthew wasn’t so keen on it and after discussing it we decided it might lead off away from the real priorities. Just returning to the comic books you find that Erik can — in terms of taking on a voice — Erik can be anything when we meet him. He speaks German, he goes to a concentration camp in Poland, ends up in Eastern Europe with Magda, has a child there and then sort of goes off to Israel. There’s so much there and I tried to approach it freshly from that source material and see what I could come up with independently. There is, of course, the hint of what Ian McKellen has done in the movies is there as well.”

McAvoy, for his part, said he was glad to go back to a version of younger Professor X that wasn’t the “selfless, sexless monk” of the previous movies.

Kevin Bacon as Sebastian Shaw and January Jones as Emma Frost (Marvel Studios)

The 1960s setting for this film, meanwhile, not only allows for some “Mad Men” fashion options (and January Jones from that acclaimed AMC series is one of the costars) but it makes this the first Marvel Comics adaptation that is fully set in the decade when the creations of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and others made that company’s name a true pop-culture brand. “There’s something special about connecting with that history and that heritage,” Singer said. As far as costars, newly minted Oscar nominee Jennifer Lawrence will play a younger version of Mystique and Nicholas Hoult jumps into the role of Beast, but there are plenty of new names pulled from the comics, among them Emma Frost (Jones), Azazel (Jason Flemyng), Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) and Havok (Lucas Till).

Still, at the heart of it all, McAvoy says, are Charles and Erik and the magnetic hold they have on each other.

“It’s kind of a love story, like ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,’ which, really, was a love story between two men. This is the first time in their lives they’ve met someone who is an equal of sorts, someone who understands them and can connect and push them too. Especially Charles, he’s fascinated with Erik and his potential. For Erik, Charles is the first person he’s trusted to really tell about his past and the first person to understand the horrible things he’s been through.”

– Geoff Boucher
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Fri Apr 29, 2011 3:13 pm

http://www.reelzchannel.com/movie-news/10124/michael-fassbender-zo%C3%AB-kravitz-and-lucas-till-talk-more-x-men-first-class-plus-new-photo-released/

Michael Fassbender, Zoë Kravitz, and Lucas Till Talk More X-Men: First Class; Plus New Photo Released
Posted 04.28.11 by Ryan

The promotional blitz for X-Men: First Class has lately come in form of trailers, posters and photos — with MTV recently revealing another new photo of the cast (shown above) — but the cast of director Matthew Vaughn's X-Men prequel has also been doing the press rounds as well.

Michael Fassbender recently spoke to The LA Times about playing Erik Lensherr, a.k.a. Magneto, in the movie, a role he inherited from Ian McKellen who played the character in the previous trilogy of X-Men movies. Fassbender revealed that he decided not to use McKellen's performance as a basis for his own.

At one point I thought, should I study Ian McKellen as a young man, should I take that approach? Matthew wasn’t so keen on it and after discussing it we decided it might lead off away from the real priorities. Just returning to the comic books you find that Erik can — in terms of taking on a voice — Erik can be anything when we meet him. He speaks German, he goes to a concentration camp in Poland, ends up in Eastern Europe with Magda, has a child there and then sort of goes off to Israel. There’s so much there and I tried to approach it freshly from that source material and see what I could come up with independently. There is, of course, the hint of what Ian McKellen has done in the movies is there as well.

Besides the rising stars of Fassbender and James McAvoy, who takes over for Patrick Stewart as Professor X, First Class' mutant team is filled with young actors like Zoë Kravitz as the winged Angel Salvadore. Kravitz told MTV that she was "one of the last people cast" in the movie, and won the role after impressing Vaughn with a "sexy" audition.

It happened really quickly. They were being really secretive about the script and the characters that were going to be in the film, so I didn't even know who I was auditioning for. I didn't think I had a shot. I didn't even take it seriously. It wasn't with [director] Matthew [Vaughn]. It was with the casting director in New York. I got the call at the last minute and I'd gone out the night before and I was hungover and tired and not the prepared person that I usually am. I was wearing a big hat and totally not being a sexy X-Men character. I went in and had a good time with it. They called back and said, "Matthew really responded to your tape, but can you come back and maybe wear something a little more sexy?" I didn't know until later the character was a go-go dancer. I went back in and in the next two weeks, I was on plane to London.

Lucas Till is one of the cast members that has responded to fan questions on the movie's Facebook page, but recently told IGN that his character, Havok, has a "dark side" revealed in the movie.

When Havok first discovers his power in this one it's because his foster sister has been kidnapped by a bully and who is threatening her with death and all of a sudden he comes out and kills this guy. He's a guy who likes a fight, but also, he doesn't want that much of a fight. He doesn't want to accidentally kill people, and that's something he's always got to deal with. He likes the power but he doesn't like the lack of control he has over his ability.

In the X-Men comic books, Havok is Alex Summers, the younger brother of Scott Summers, a.k.a. Cyclops, the character James Marsden played in the X-Men trilogy. Confusingly, Till said that Havok was "Cyclops' younger brother", which, considering First Class' 1960s setting, would mean that Cyclops should be older in the X-Men movies, especially after producer Bryan Singer recently said that "the chronology works" for First Class to sync up to the other X-Men movies. However it works, Till said that Havok will also have power control issues, much like the character's comic book origins.

Just like Scott can't control his power without glasses or a visor on, historically Alex has never been able to control his power either, so it's always been outbursts with a lack of control. In the comics he has a suit that absorbs excess energy but it was more like a meter that would tell him how much power he has, whereas in this one I have something that channels it because I can't control it myself. So I have a chest-piece that focuses the ray so I don't blow my team-mates up.

Till says that "every" mutant in the movie will have "a good piece of action" which means it should be quite action packed considering the long list of mutant characters, including Azazel (Jason Flemying), Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence), Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Emma Frost (January Jones), Banshee (Caleb Landry Jones), Darwin (Edi Gathegi), and Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon). Rose Byrne and Oliver Platt co-star as human characters Moira MacTaggert and The Man in Black, respectively.
Next Showing: X-Men: First Class opens June 3


Read more about Michael Fassbender, Zoë Kravitz, and Lucas Till Talk More X-Men: First Class; Plus New Photo Released by www.reelzchannel.com
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Tue May 10, 2011 9:54 pm

http://uk.movies.yahoo.com/blog/article/177226/the-x-men-speak-out-which-mutant-power-would-you-have.html


The X-Men speak out: Which mutant power would you have?

Mon May 09 12:39PM by Joe Utichi

Putting the cast of 'X-Men: First Class' to the test, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne, Jason Flemyng, Nicholas Hoult, Jennifer Lawrence, Alex Gonzalez, Edi Gathegi, Zoe Kravitz, Lucas Till and Caleb Landry Jones pick the mutant powers they’d have if they could.

James McAvoy (Charles Xavier/Professor X) – "Erik’s is such a good power, but at the same time I’m not that impressed with a man that can bend metal. It doesn’t speak to me of drama. I’d love, love, love anything that was to do with flying. There’s not much else you can wish for in life if you can pop down to the shops and not get stopped by the traffic. And I’d quite like to be able to heal people as well, like Elixir. We nearly had Elixir in this film, but ultimately we chose not to. I think it made everything quite hard to have real drama and sense of impending fatality if somebody could just heal people."

Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto) – "I think the power to speak different languages. Is that a superpower? A tail would be kind of cool. You can balance and stuff with a tail. Be like a monkey. Or just for climbing, you know. Flying’s pretty amazing, but you could fly with a tail… From tree to tree, like spider monkeys. Tail Man. Tail-linguist. Flying’s the obvious one - it’s like that thing of what animal you’d be if you could be any animal. It would be a bird, because flight is the one thing we can't do."

Rose Byrne (Moira MacTaggart) – "I’d like a combination. I’d like Charles's power to read and to block people’s minds, but then I’d also love Angel Salvadore’s power to acid vomit! I think that’d be useful. You’re saying to the AD, "Where’s my cup of tea?" Boom! Your reputation might be a bit ruined. You might burn a few bridges. Literally. Maybe just the threat of it – just a side spew so they could see what you’ve got… But yeah, I think a combination of a few of them would be really cool."

Jason Flemyng (Azazel) – "It would be Maestro – which means I can charge up anyone’s credit card with the power of my mind. Or Oystro, for the tube. Or Alphabetico, which means it could be books or DVDs or music libraries, and I can just alphabetize them like that. Oystro – the lamest X-Men of all time. I just love the idea of lame superpowers. People can do amazing things like teleport and stuff, but with something like this it’s still a power, it’s just rubbish."

Nicholas Hoult (Hank McCoy/Beast) – "The one I have in the film's pretty cool. Even just to be able to have an opposable big toe and to be able to do things with your feet would be great. But this is a really difficult question. Obviously being invisible would be great. Flying would be great. But there are better ones, probably, than that. I’d like to be able to control people’s destinies… That kind of sounds like I want to be God, doesn’t it? I want to be God! There we go. I just spit that out and realised in hindsight that was a ridiculous thing to say! I’d quite like morphing – Mystique’s one – actually. That’s quite cool."

Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkholme/Mystique) - "Don’t I have to say shape shifting? I would love to be able to run up stairs without falling, but I don’t think that’s a superhero power. Every time I run up stairs I fall, it’s the weirdest thing ever. Basic human balance. Well, Zoe can fly. Flying would be awesome. But it has to be cooler than flying… Well, if I could fly it would solve my running up the stairs and tripping problem, because I could just fly up the stairs… So I’m sticking with that. And sharpening pencils with my eyes."

Edi Gathegi (Armando Muñoz/Darwin) – "I’ll tell you a story – I was an 'X-Men' fan growing up. I woke up every Saturday morning and I was glued to the TV when the 'X-Men' cartoon was on. And when the movie came out I loved it. It was the best superhero reimagining that I’d ever seen. I loved the 'X-Men' series. But Wolverine was the guy I loved when I was a kid. For some reason – the adamantium, the swagger, it was all about Wolverine. My character’s relatively new – he was created maybe five years ago – and if my character were around when I was a kid, he’d definitely be my favourite character. I tell you what the powers are and you go, ‘Wait a minute, that’s awesome.’ He wasn’t around when I was a kid, but if he were it’d be all about Darwin."

Zoe Kravitz (Angel Salvadore/Tempest) – "I think it’d be flying. I really think I have the best power. Doesn’t everyone want to fly? It’s like the coolest thing ever. And I projectile vomit acid!"

Lucas Till (Alex Summers/Havok) – "It’s a tossup. I think you would want something like Shaw’s power, where he can absorb kinetic energy and throw it back at something. That’s all-powerful. But you also want a little style with it, like Magneto. It’s not just all-powerful - he can bend metal and that’s it - but there’s a lot of things you can manipulate with that. I’ve always loved Magneto’s power."

Caleb Landry Jones (Sean Cassidy/Banshee) – "I wonder how many people have said teleportation… That’s probably the best, I think. I’d be rich; I’d have travelled the world, possibly space. I could do all sorts of things with it."

What superpower would you like to have?
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 5:09 pm

http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/immaculate-noise/posts/january-jones-merely-enjoyed-being-a-mutant-in-new-x-men-first-class

January Jones merely 'enjoyed being a mutant' in new 'X-Men: First Class'
By Katie Hasty - 'Silly, drunk and randy' James McAvoy, WonderBras and Michael Fassbender's zinger

Wednesday, May 25, 2011 3:54 PM

January Jones merely 'enjoyed being a mutant' in new 'X-Men: First Class'

January Jones in "X-Men: First Class"

Despite the elaborate set pieces, extreme costumes and a travel back in time, January Jones simply "enjoyed being a mutant" in new "X-Men: First Class."

The '60s era during which the comic book film takes place may be no new stretch to Jones, who's best known for her role as Betty Draper in "Mad Men." But the privileges of having superpowers were not lost on her or her "X-Men" castmates, gathered in New York today (May 25) to discuss the franchise flick. "I loved my character the best I think," she deadpanned as actors like James McAvoy (Charles Xavier), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Kevin Bacon (Sebastian Shaw) and Rose Byrne (Moira MacTaggert) debated the strengths of the story and their own characters.

Byrne -- who plays a non-mutant CIA agent -- admitted to a little "power envy." Bacon was "knocked out" upon viewing the movie, unknowing how his mutant power to absorb and manipulate energy was going to manifest on screen.

"Where he's wise, I was unwise. Where he's chaste, I was rather randy," McAvoy said, comparing his younger, "silly and drunk" version of Professor X to the elder, played by Patrick Stewart in the five other "X-Men" films. "I didn't see myself as..."

"... a bald guy," Fassbender cheerfully chimed in.

And to that -- of all the many different foreign languages spoken in "First Class" -- none seem to be as widely adopted as sarcasm and gentle chiding on set and during this promotional run. Zoe Kravitz said preparation for her role as acid-spitting, flying former stripper Angel involved "research on the WonderBra." Upon initially learning he got a part in the film, Bacon said his first thought was, "Who fell out?" Fassbender and McAvoy -- whose characters in them play out how they began as friends and end as enemies -- were quick to suggest baby names to round-bellied Jones, who is expecting a child in the fall.

"Little Magneto...

"Little Xavier...

"Little Banshee...

"Little Riptide..."

Many of the actors described the process of making the movie "fast-paced," "tough" and "under-pressure" or having joined the cast "very quickly." The Matthew Vaughn project had undergone some delays but obviously made it out just fine on the other side, said McAvoy. When he'd first seen the final, he encouraged Fassbender to watch it as soon as possible."I said, You've got to see it quick, you're gonna be relieved, you'll be able to go to the toilet again," he laughed. "We were worried, man, because sometimes these things are a nightmare, and it's been well-documented that they can."
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 5:19 pm

http://www.digitalspy.com/celebrity/news/a321523/james-mcavoy-nobody-recognises-me.html

James McAvoy: 'Nobody recognises me'
Wednesday, May 25 2011, 3:35pm EDT
By Kristy Kelly, Entertainment Reporter

© WENN / Patricia Schlein
James McAvoy has revealed that he hardly ever gets noticed when walking down the street.

The X-Men: First Class actor, who spends most of his time in London, explained that he rarely gets approached when he is out.

He told Bang Showbiz: "People have been asking me about fame since I did Narnia. It never seemed to happen.

"I've been recognized on the streets maybe about ten times since then. It never really worries me, that stuff. I'm standing outside school gates going, 'Recognize me, recognize me, please!'"

McAvoy's co-star Michael Fassbender, who plays Magneto in the movie, said that he also receives minimal attention, but added that were he to become a more recognisable face, there would not be much he could do about it.

He explained: "I mean, what can you do? Hopefully it's not going to change anything. I can't really answer until I'm confronted with it but so far no problem.

"I worked with Viggo Mortensen last year in Vienna and he's in one of the biggest franchises in the world (Lord of the Rings) and no-one bothered us."

McAvoy is in talks to star in forthcoming thriller Welcome to the Punch
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 5:27 pm

http://www.ugo.com/movies/x-men-first-class-interviews

The X-Men Team Up and Meet the Press
The handsome men and gorgeous women of X-Men: First Class show they are all class.
By Jordan Hoffman 4 hours ago

As a beautiful person, it's out of the ordinary for me to hang out in a cozy hospitality suite at the Ritz-Carlton on Central Park. This time (and who can keep them straight anymore) I was there with James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Kevin Bacon, January Jones, Rose Byrne, Zoe Kravitz and Lucas Till. All had mutant abilities - mine was the power to eat complimentary blondies while the cast of X-Men: First Class discussed the making of this new (terrific) film.

Noticeable from the start was how much this ensemble enjoyed working with one another. Yeah, I know, they're actors and it is their job to fake it, but I've been to a lot of press conferences and the amount of joshing and all around lulz was in a high percentile. When young Lucas Till (he plays Havok) admitted that he spaced-out when some dunce asked a long-winded and confusing question, he brought the house down.

James McAvoy (Charles Xavier/Professor X) and Michael Fassbender (Erik Lensherr/Magneto) were asked if they studied the mannerisms of Patrick Stewart or Ian McKellen, and both said they were advised by director Matthew Vaughn to "wipe the slate clean." McAvoy continued that there would be no point in delivering the samer performance in sexier 1960s suits, and made an effort to flip what's expected of Professon X whenever possible. "Whereas Stewart's version is chaste, this one is a little randy."

One of the fun elements of X-Men: First Class is that it is set in the early 1960s. A major set piece revolves around the Cuban Missile Crises, but other than costumes, small televisions, a few "groovys" and a "daddy-o," director Vaughan didn't want the film to feel too period. Kevin Bacon, who plays the evil Nazi doctor-turned head of the Hellfire Club Sebastian Shaw, told us that Vaughan scolded him for "going to '60s" at times, then asking us if we knew "what the hell kind of direction is that?"

When asked who had the coolest mutant power, most turned to Zoe Kravitz, whose Angel can fly (she has butterfly wings) and can also shoot acid out of her mouth. McAvoy was quick to stand up for the absent Caleb Landry Jones, whose Banshee uses vocal vibrations to fly and do other things that'd be spoilery of me to mention. "Caleb becomes a rock star. A rock star for all humanity at the end."

January Jones demured that she liked her character the best. She didn't get into what specifically about Emma Frost's powers she liked, but later offered that "my sexuality comes very easily to me." There was a bit of a pregnant pause in the room after that.

Michael Fassbender, whose portrayal of Magneto is absolutely fantastic, said he loves the gray area of the film. "Too many films spoonfeed audiences." Despite being a "comic book movie," X-Men: First Class, better than any X-Men movie yet, digs into the unanswerable question of whether Magneto is evil, or just wise.

When asked about the film's publicized "troubled shoot," James McAvoy said there was no use in hiding that it was an unorthodox production, but was overjoyed when he saw the finished film. He immidiately called Michael Fassbender and told him that it was not only good, but "you'll be able to go to the toilet properly again."

X-Men: First Class is out in theaters June 3 and my review will be on UGO as soon as I am given the green light to print it. I hope you don't consider it a spoiler to know that I think it is terrific.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 5:37 pm

http://www.thisisfakediy.co.uk/articles/film/x-men-first-class-press-conference

Posted 25th May 2011, 1:34pm
X-Men: First Class Press Conference
James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender and Kevin Bacon discuss Matthew Vaughn's amazing film.
Posted 25th May 2011, 1:34pm in Film | By Becky Reed

It's wowed critics, bloggers and anyone lucky enough to have seen it already, and we can confirm that X-Men: First Class is a miracle of a superhero movie.

Director Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass, Stardust, Layer Cake) has rebooted the franchise with his longterm writing collaborator Jane Goldman, and crafted a stunning, spectacular and big-hearted blockbuster. If you thought X-Men and X2 were special, you've seen nothing yet.

An origins story, it takes us back to the Sixties, where the young Professor X and Magneto were friends, not enemies. James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender take on the roles immortalised by Sir Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen, with Kevin Bacon relishing his villainous Sebastian Shaw - a man determined to start WWIII.

The three actors were joined at the London press conference by Goldman and fellow mutants Zoe Kravitz (who plays Angel), Alex Gonzalez (Riptide) and the highly amusing Vaughn regular Jason Flemyng, who is unrecognisable as Azazel.

How familiar were you with the X-Men world before you started this film?
Kevin: I didn't grow up so much with the comics. I had a few, but it wasn't a big part of my childhood. I knew the films. One of the great things about working on the thing, the day I got to Pinewood, the guys from Marvel came out with this gigantic bible of everything that had been drawn and written about Sebastian Shaw. That was about 75% of my research.
James: I was really aware of the cartoon when I was growing up. When I was 12 years old they started showing it on Live and Kicking. They would do the thing where you'd watch the first half of the cartoon then they'd make you way an hour and fifteen minutes before they'd show you the second half. I was a big fan of that, and the first couple of films.
Jason: Matt flirted with doing one of the other X-Men films earlier on, so I was aware of them. I was considered for Beast, but that didn't happen. So instead of being big, blue and hairy, I'm red and slightly out of focus! [laughter]

Were you inspired by the film actors, or did you take it from the comic books?
James: The comic book history and the comic book lore is really different from all the X-Men movies that have come before, and even the cartoon to a certain extent. In the comic books, my character is American, and fortunately, they decided to make that character English when they cast Sir Patrick Stewart, which was a masterstroke of casting. So I watched the films, with the knowledge it was going to be a prequel, so it had to be different. The franchise needed something new. There's no point having the same character played the same way, in a different suit, because it just doesn't validate the movie. I took a lot of notes on Sir Patrick's performance, but it was more about seeing how I could make it different. So where Patrick was wise, I'd be foolhardy, where he was chaste, I'd be randy. If we make any money, and make three films, I'll end up doing something much more like Sir Patrick. It was really important to start in a different place, but taking the cues from his performance.
Michael: In the beginning, I started studying Ian McKellen, getting my hands on anything I could where he was a young man on screen, studying his physicality and voice and whatnot. Then I sat down with with Matthew, and we decided that wasn't the way he wanted to go. So at that point I ditched that idea completely and used the comic book material that was available. I was spoilt as there was so much there in the character's biography.

Jane, how hard was it to get a seamless history for an origins story?
Jane: I think it would be impossible to write any story that fits in with every single part of the X-Men universe, because even the comics have different timelines, and each artist did their own take. The films have their own world as well. I don't think there's any storyline I could write that could fit in seamlessly with the movie world and every iteration of the comic world. The aim was to tell a good story but be respectful of the material and be true to the spirit of it.
James: One of the things that always runs through the X-Men movies is that they're about us - people who feel like outsiders, who have a certain amount of self-loathing perhaps. People who are afraid of themselves, don't like themselves, want to be normal, or rejoice in the fact that they aren't normal. That's one of the key elements you managed to put in there.
Jane: Thank you James!

James, there's a nice moment when you hint that you might go bald. How do you think that may be addressed?
James: He either shaves it or he loses it, we don't know how. In the source material, he loses it the day his powers activate themselves when he was quite young. We decided not to do that. When spend time in this movie explaining why he can't walk, so maybe we'll see how he loses his hair in another movie. Because we haven't taken the explanation given in the comic books, we need to come up with a really good character-driven, narrative-essential reason. We can't just start a new movie with a new look. We need to embrace the change.



Kevin, you're already a superhero to your many fans - what was it like playing a mutant?
Kevin: It was great. It's great to be a mutant. It's the first time I've played a mutant. If you look at this movie, aside from the power and the mutations, compared to many other comic book characters, they are extremely human in the way that they feel things, they get jealous, they feel hate and fear, and get drunk together. I think that was the challenge from an acting standpoint - to forget about your powers, as that will be taken care of. To constantly bring it back to "who am I on the human side?" For me, I've never played a billionaire playboy megalomaniac, so that was cool!

How relieved were you that you didn't have Sebastian Shaw's sideburns?
Kevin: A lot of people asked me about the responsibility to fans of the comic books, and there is one. I hope there won't be too much disappointment about the fact I don't look anything like Sebastian Shaw. When I first read the script, I went online and googled it. I saw this Lou Ferrigno-type guy with a ponytail dressed like George Washington. I thought, I just don't know how I'm going to do that! Luckily, for Matt, that wasn't the direction he wanted to go with. A lot of the things I've read about him was applicable whether or not he looks the way he does in the comics.

Can you talk about the physicality of the roles and the superpowers?
Kevin: Yeah, I mean, someone said to me today when I was talking about the look, the voice, the hair and the walk - they went "you make a decision about the walk?" of course I do - it's an integral part of who a person is, the way they move through this life. He's a very, very confident man.
Michael: I just thought, how can I physically represent constipation through my hand? That was my inspiration really. I didn't really know what to do. There was an element of me that felt like a bit of an idiot as a grown man trying to bend metal things with my hands. I wasn't even sure if I should physicalise it with my hands. The safety net was that Erik, at this point in his life, wasn't really sure how to harness these powers. So it is a little bit haphazard and random. It's only through meeting Charles that he unleashes his full potential. I was really happy when I watched the film, because I'd seen some of what Bill [Milner] had done with young Erik, which was amazing, but I hadn't seen any of the metal stuff. I was happy to see in the film how I was echoing what he had started off.
James: I saw what everyone else was doing and they got to do cool ninja stuff, really cool action, I don't get to do anything. So I thought I have to physicalise my power in some way, so I came up with the masterstroke of touching my temple. [laughter] I went through three months of intensive training with temple ninjas based in Dagenham. What I really like in films is that everybody is working on full power trying to get into the intensity of the emotions, but that the powers in the beginning are quite offhand - they're quite flippant. It wasn't like every time someone used a power, there was this "woosh" close-up special shot. It's much more part of their everyday life.
Jason: He's just trying to justify why his looks more like Carphone Warehouse than ninja.
Alex: Riptide can control the wind. It was helpful comparing him to a tornado. I don't know what I'm doing, talking in English for the first time in seven months... When you look at the tornado from afar, it's calm and lovely, but inside of the tornado is very fast. Riptide is the same thing - he looks very elegant, and he's calm in his suit, but inside of him everything is going very fast, and he's very aggressive. As violent as a tornado. Yes, I was about to throw up!
Zoe: [The harnesses] were good. It does hurt after a while - it becomes painful around the crotch area. The happy parts were not so happy. [laughter]



This film has attracted a more quality actor than other superhero films, why is that?
Michael: I dunno, Robert Downey Jr's a good actor.
Kevin: The Dark Knight? There was some good acting in that movie! This is the way I'll answer - for me, the chance to work with some of the finest young actors working today, who are either blowing up or about to blow up, was a thrill. It's just a kick-ass cast - no pun intended! [to Jane]
Jane: We had some conversations about casting, but it's always the director's choice. I do stick my oar in whenever I can!
Kevin: You didn't call me until a week before shooting! Who pulled out? [laughter]
Jane: I was fighting for you all the way Kevin!

There are dual ideologies in this film, belonging to Charles and Erik - who's right?
Michael: That's your call. That's what interests me as an actor and as an audience member. Especially with big, commercial films, the audience is spoonfed the entire experience, and they don't have to do any work. I believe when you see a film, you should have to invest some of yourself in it as audience member. So when you leave the cinema, you should be having those conversations with either yourself, if you're crazy like me, or your friends afterwards. There should be an ambiguity - the grey area is what's interesting.

When you were younger was there anything you wanted to change about yourselves?
Michael: I had really bad acne when I was a teenager, so that was something I desperately wanted to get rid of.
Jason: This film is about prejudice and how people are perceived. Being in the minority of ginger-haired people - it's faded as I've got older, which is depressing - but my wife said that when she was asked about me when we got together, she said "he's ginger but he's really lovely." That's an indication of how people judge people without realising they're doing it.
Michael: Touching on what James said earlier, that idea of alienation is very prevalent in our society, and most people deal with it at some point in their life, unless they're a golden child. That's something we all need to address. Our race remains very tribal, and we haven't moved away from that over hundreds of years.



How did you feel about the Cuban missile crisis being appropriated for this movie?
Jane: As long as children don't think the Cuban missile crisis had anything to do with mutants...
Michael: You don't know that Jane!
Kevin: I think it could go two ways - it could be kind of silly, but it's handled very well, and in a compelling way. There's a lot of things that are historically inaccurate when it comes to making films and writing stories. That's what we do. If you want to see real history, watch a documentary. If nothing else, if a kid sees it who has no idea of this time in world history, maybe it could inspire some further research into what happened.
James: There was a movie when I was a kid called Young Einstein, about Enstein in Tasmania. It was a wacky comedy, and I loved it. I didn't know who Einstein was before this, so I looked him up. I was shocked and dismayed to find out he wasn't a farm-hand who invented the electric violin in Tasmania, but I did learn about Einstein and did find out about the theory of relativity. I think I was about six at the time.
Michael: I was around at the time, but my parents were, and it's interesting to learn about that sense of anxiety. People were building bunkers outsite their houses, stocking up on canned goods. Nobody knows how close we came to war at that point. I think there's mystery that is there to be exploited.
Jane: I wouldn't want it to be a gimmick.
Jason: The mutant miners strike! Scargill and Thatcher!

This is Matthew's first big Hollywood film - have his working methods changed at all?
Jason: I don't think they have. He's not very nomadic, and he has a team of people that fluctuate through his movies. Unfortunately, I've done them all, as I'm always available. His working method stays the same, and it's amazing to be on a movie this big and see the same sound guys and costume people from Lock, Stock [and Two Smoking Barrels]. He likes to work in shorthand... basically, I was cast so when he got annoyed with this lot, and couldn't say anything, he could turn to me and go "Flemyng, you're an idiot!"

There's subtle Bond and Sixties imagery. Michael and James, are you aware that you're the frontrunners for the next Bond?
Jason: [sarcastically] As am I!
James: I'll take myself out of the running for that immediately. I think this guy [Michael] does a great job in this film. It was never really my remit.
Michael: It's very flattering, and Matthew had mentioned in his meetings that it was the intention. For me, approaching the character of Erik, I didn't really go down that route. They dressed me up in bespoke suits that hark back to the early Bond films, but I really just approached it through the material in the comics.

What would be the worst superpower to have?
James: The power to control lead pencils.
Jason: Oystero! You can charge up your Oyster card by looking at it. Alphabetico! Look at your DVD collection and automatically alphabeticise it.

James and Michael, do you worry about how fame is going to affect your life?
James: I don't. People have been saying that to me since I did Narnia. I've been recognised in the street ten times since then.
Michael: What can you do? I was lucky enough to work with Viggo Mortensen last year, and we walked all around Vienna. He was part of one of the biggest franchises in the world.

How distracting was January Jones' cleavage?
James: I had to rugby tackle January Jones' cleavage.
Michael: You try not to make her feel uncomfortable. It's a difficult scenario for her. She's dressed in skimpy clothes, and there are a plethora of fans that are all excited about the prospect of it. You're there working with her as a professional, and it wouldn't do well if you bought that kind of giddiness into the room.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 5:43 pm

http://www.thehollywoodnews.com/2011/05/25/the-cast-of-x-men-first-class-speak-out-at-the-films-uk-press-conference/?

The cast of X-Men First Class speak out at the film’s UK press conference
May 25, 2011 By Paul Heath

On Monday this week, not only was I lucky enough to see a very advance screening of the fantastic new movie prequel X-MEN FIRST CLASS, but I was able to boogie on down to the Dorchester Hotel in London to mix with the cast of the movie. Present was the likes of James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Zoe Kravitz, Jason Flemying, Alex Gonzales, Kevin Bacon and screenwriter Jane Goldman. Various questions were posed to the panel of A-listers, and here’s a little of what went down. We were even treated to tiny little X-shaped cakes – pan on down the page to see the one that I managed to devour. Lovely.



Jane Goldman, Kevin Bacon, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Zoe Kravitz, Jason Flemying and Alex Gonzales

Were you all aware of the comic books before making X-MEN FIRST CLASS?

Kevin Bacon: I didn’t grow up so much with comics. I had a few, but it wasn’t a big part of my childhood. I knew the [X-Men] films, and one of the great things about working on this movie was getting this gigantic bible from the guys at Marvel, which had everything that had been written about and drawn about in regards to Sebastian Shaw. That made up about 75% of my research.

Michael Fassbender: Ditto

[laughter]

James McAvoy: A man of few words. I was really aware of the comic books and the cartoon when I was growing up. I was about twelve years old and the show had shown up on Live and Kicking I think. I would make the mistake of watching that first cartoon… and then they’d make you wait an hour and fifteen minutes to show you the second half of the cartoon.

Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy

These characters [Professor Xavier and Magneto] were established in the comic books but also in the movies by two other actors and my questions is, did you look at the actors or did you base your performance on the comic book?

James McAvoy. Well, the comic book history is very different from all of the X-Men movies that have come before; even the cartoon to a certain extent. In the comic books my character is an American person and Fox decided to make that character English when they cast Sir Patrick Stewart. So, I had to go with the film I think, so I watched the films and thenas this is a prequel, it had to be different, and the franchise needed to be fresh but also there’s no point having that character played the same way in a different suit becuase it just doesn’t validate the movie. It has to be different. So I looked at Sir Patrick and took a lot of notes but it was more about seeing something different. So, where Patrick was wise I would be foolhardy. Where he was chaste, I would be randy [laughter]. By the end of three films, if we make any money, I will end up doing something that feels more like Patrick Stewart, but it was really important to start in a different place, but taking the cues from Sir Patrick.

Michael Fassbender: Yes, at the beginnign when I found out that I’d got the job, I thought about studying Ian McKellen and get my hands on anything that I could where he was a young man on screen, just to study his physicality and voice and whatnot, but then I sat down with Matthew (Vaughn) and discussed it and he had decided that that wasn’t the way he wanted to go. So, I ditched that idea totally and started to use the comic book material and other source material that was available. I was spoilt really; there was so much there.

Question for Jane [Goldman, screenwriter]. I’m interested as to how it was writing this story are making it fit in with world history and whether there were any drafts that had to be rewritten when somebody spotted and oversight perhaps.

Jane Goldman: I think that it would be impossible to write any story that fits in with every single part of the X-Men universe because the comics don’t. Different writers and artists have their own take and the films have their own world as well. I don’t think that there’s any story that can fit in with the movie world and every itteration of the comic books. I think that the most important thing to do is to tell a good story and be respectful to the source material and be true to the spirit of it.

James McAvoy: I think that one of the things that always runs through the X-Men movies is that they are about people who feel like outsiders. People who are upset about self-loathing perhaps… are afraid of themselves and want to be normal perhaps or rejoice in the fact that they are not normal, and this is one of the key elements in all of the X-Men stuff and I think that you [Jane] managed to put in there.

Jane Goldman: I think that that’s an illustration of the spirit of it. Thank you.

James McAvoy: No problem. [laughs]

Michael Fassbender, Zoe Kravitz and James McAvoy

James, there a nicely humourous element towards the end of the film where you say that you might be bald when you get older. How do you think that that might be addressed. Maybe have a nice buzz cut maybe?

James McAvoy: Well, either he shaves it, or he loses it. In the comic books he loses it the day that his powers activate when he is very young. We decided not to do that . Maybe it’s a smart move in an origin story. We spend time in this movie expaining why he can’t walk so we’ll get to see why he loses his hair or shaves his head in a future movie. We’ve saved that for that.

Kevin, you are a superhero to your many fans – what was it like playing a mutant?

Kevin Bacon: Yeah, it’s great. Great to be a mutant.

[laughter]

Kevin Bacon: It’s the first time that I’ve played a mutant. I was a great opportunity. I think that if you look at this movie, aside from all of the powers and the mutations that these characters have, they are, compared to other comic book movies, extreemely human in the way that they feel things. They get jealous and hate and fear. That was kind of a challenge from Matthew’s standpoint. It was like forget about your powers, you powers are going to be there, that’s taken care of… It was more like who am I on the human side and for me, I;ve never played a billionaire playboy meglomaniac, so that was cool.

Long before they asked me about the responsibility to fans of the comic books, and I think that there is a responsibility to fans of the comic book… I hope that there won’t be too much disappointment that I look nothing like Sebastian Shaw. When I first read the script I wanted to go online and Google him. I found that he was this massive Lou Ferigno type, pony tail wearing George Washington dressing type of character, and I didn’t know how I was going to do that. So, I eventually heard from Matt that that’s not the direction that we wanted to go.

Kevin, moving on from that, I thought that Shaw had a real swagger. Did you come up with that?

Kevin Bacon: The walk is a cool part as to what the person is. It’s the way that they move. He’s [Shaw] a very confident man. I mean even at teh end of the movie when things start turning to s$#!, he thinks ‘ah,’ everything’s going to be fine. He’s very confident and I think that’s important in the way he moves.

Zoe Kravitz

Zoe, how was filming the action scenes for you – working with the harness?

It was good. It does after a while become painful around the crotch. The happy parts. [laughter]

X-Men seems to attract quality actors. Is it because of the depth that the characters have which is different to other comic book movies?

Kevin Bacon : I think that Robert Downey Jr’s quite a good actor actually. [laughter] I think for me to get a chance to work with some of the finest young actors working today who are blowing up or are about to blow up, was a thrill. It’s just a kick-ass cast. No pun intended. Just the way that it all laid in and the choices that Matt made about the actors. It’s one of the great strengths of the movie.

Jane, how much input do you have when you are writing in terms of actors. Do you think that hey, this could be a great Kevin Bacon role?

Jane Goldman: We certainly have conversations about it, but of course it’s always the director’s choice, but I do stick my oar in whenever I can.

Kevin Bacon: You didn’t call me until a week before shooting!

Jane Goldman: I was fighting for you all of the way Kevin!

[laughter]

Duelling ideologies in this film, one for Charles and one for Erik, but who’s right?

Michael Fassbender: That’s your call. That’s what interests me as an actor and as an audience member. I go to the cinema, especially nowadays with big commerical films, and see that the audience is spoon fed and they don’t have to do any work. I believe that you want to go and see films that you want to invest something yourself and that you have to do a bit of work as an audience member so that when you leave the cinema, you should be having those conversations. It’s like, should I be backing Erik? There should be an ambiguity, and there should be, I think, the grey areas. I don’t like; okay here’s your villain, here’s your hero. That just makes it too comfortable and easy for an audience.

X-MEN FIRST CLASS opens in the UK from Wednesday 1st June.

Here’s a couple of snaps from the press conference from my own high quality digital camera, otherwise known as an iPhone. Stay tuned to THN for more kick-ass X-MEN FIRST CLASS coverage.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed May 25, 2011 8:52 pm

http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/story/james-mcavoy-and-michael-fassbender-relieved-x-men-first-class-is-actually-good_1221688

James Mcavoy - James Mcavoy And Michael Fassbender 'Relieved' X-Men: First Class Is Actually Good
26 May 2011 01:33

Actors James Mcavoy and Michael Fassbender are breathing a sigh of relief after giving their approval to the final cut of their new movie X-Men: First Class, because they feared it would turn out "really bad".

The Last King of Scotland star portrays Professor Charles Xavier in the prequel, while Fassbender plays mutant superhero Magneto alongside a cast which includes Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, Kevin Bacon and January Jones.

But MCAvoy and Fassbender admit they were "worried" about how the movie would come together on the big screen, because comic book adaptations are usually either big hits or big misses.

MCAvoy tells WENN, "I phoned Michael within a half hour (of seeing it) saying, 'Dude, you've got to see this movie really quick because you're gonna be relieved. You're gonna be able to go to the toilet again properly.'

"We were worried man because sometimes these things are a nightmare to make and it's well documented so there's no point in hiding out but it turned out really good. I think we always thought it could either be really different and really brilliant or really bad and really different."

And their co-star Bacon, who plays Sebastian Shaw, a mutant with kinetic energy powers, was equally blown away by director Matthew Vaughn's finished work.

He says, "I was completely knocked out and many people who I contacted said, 'I don't think I've ever heard you react to one of your movies like that.' It was also super cool for me because there's so much that I'm not in that I wasn't really seeing it being shot. I didn't see all the sets so a lot of the stuff I was seeing for the first time and the effects are jaw dropping. I had no idea what my own power was gonna look like so I was thrilled."
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Fri May 27, 2011 3:49 pm

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2011-05-26-x-men-red-carpet-report_n.htm

Red carpet report: 'X-Men First Class'
By Andrea Mandell, USA TODAY

What: The X-Men saga hits rewind and turns back to the franchise's Cold War beginning. Newly discovered mutants meet each other for the first time, harness their powers and form powerful alliances.

'X-Men: First Class' stars, from left: Lucas Till, Rose Byrne, Zoe Kravitz, Kevin Bacon, January Jones, James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender in New York.

By Peter Kramer,, AP

'X-Men: First Class' stars, from left: Lucas Till, Rose Byrne, Zoe Kravitz, Kevin Bacon, January Jones, James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender in New York.

Where: Ziegfeld Theatre, New York City

When: Tuesday night

Guest list:James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne, January Jones, Oliver Platt, Lucas Till, Kevin Bacon, Zoë Kravitz

Facing the fanboys: McAvoy takes on the franchise's legendary Professor X, and admitted he was "maybe a little worried" about fanboys ready to critique the film. "But, you know the fanboys were quite open about not liking the previous two movies so it was time for something different, and that's certainly what we're doing in this movie," said McAvoy.

How this X-Men is different: In this 1960s-set reboot, Magneto (Fassbender) meets Professor X for the first time while their fellow mutants band together. "We are giving it a whole new tone, it doesn't take itself so seriously, there's a lot of humor in it," said McAvoy. "But the other thing I think the fanboys have always liked are those scenes that are very few and far between in the other movies — where Erik (pre-Magneto) and Charles (pre-Professor X) go head to head and have a chat. They just have a talk. Those were some of the most intriguing scenes in the whole series and I think there's anticipation to see more of that. And that's basically what this entire film is."

Becoming Magneto: Fassbender was quick to defend the cynical Magneto, who begins the film in a Holocaust concentration camp. "I can definitely understand him," he said. "Unfortunately, as history has taught us we're a pretty destructive race. This whole idea of mutants is a very good way of disguising the fact that people feel alienated for whatever reasons in society. Everything Magneto says kind of comes true."

"800-page binders" of comics: Bacon, Kravitz, Fassbender and Till each admitted X-Men comic books used to be under their radar. "The first comics were given to me when I started the movie," said Bacon. "But I love the movies, I love the franchise." Till watched the '92 animated series growing up and dished on how all the actors caught up — quickly. "The comics were introduced to me in like 800-page binders on set," he said. "They had a guy who only did that for each character, he got the pivotal moments of each (one). There's 50 years of comics for some of the characters they have to introduce!"

Mutant for a day: How would the stars use their characters' powers today? Not an easy concept for Bacon, who plays energy-absorbing Sebastian Shaw. "I have to sort of be attacked to harness it and throw it back at you," said Bacon. "If I had any power at all — I sound like a beauty contestant — but it would be for people to stop killing each other and hating each other." Kravitz liked her mutant Angel's insect-like flying powers. "I would definitely use it to get places quicker. I wouldn't have to use the subway anymore."

Six degrees of … Jennifer Lawrence? Move over, Bacon, there's a new game in town. How can you connect young Hollywood? For starters, try Lawrence, who turns blue in X-Men as Mystique. She bagged the lead role in upcoming hot movie The Hunger Games, which co-stars … Lenny Kravitz, Zoë's (rather famous) father! Zoë thought the whole thing was "very cool. I hope (The Hunger Games) is good."

News you can use: Or rather, hot stars you need to know about. Fassbender and Byrne are quickly becoming two Hollywood favorites to watch. Fassbender doesn't focus on his rising profile. "I try not to think about it too much, I just try and concentrate on my work," said Fassbender, who made a splash in Inglorious Basterds and next stars in A Dangerous Method with Keira Knightley. Byrne, in Marc Jacobs, said she's still giddy over the success of Bridesmaids. "Overload!" she laughed. "It's been so embraced, I'm so proud of it. I'm happy to be working, I'm happy to be wearing this dress." Her next move is up for grabs. "I have another season of Damages and then we have a fifth season so I'm kind of figuring it out at the moment," she said.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Fri May 27, 2011 4:54 pm

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/05/27/PK7I1JGT3R.DTL

'X-Men' shows how 'First Class' friendship mutates

Michael Ordoña, Special to The Chronicle

Friday, May 27, 2011

"First Class" tracks Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender, front left) and Charles Xavier (James McAvoy).

"First Class" tracks Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender, ...Michael Fassbender's Magneto envisions a new world order. View Larger Images

There are scheming supergeniuses and impossibly ripped dudes in colorful tights - and then there are complex antagonists who make you reconsider even the good guys' positions. The uninitiated probably think of comic-book bad guys as the hypermuscular mustache twirlers who must have all the money or rule the world, mwah ha ha ha, because they're so very, very evil.

And then there's Magneto. Until Bryan Singer's "X-Men" movies, most people who don't buy comics had probably never heard of him. Even Paul McCartney fans might not have been aware of whom the heck his song "Magneto and Titanium Man" was about. But in the Marvel Universe, he's a major attraction.

At the opposite pole from X-Men leader Charles Xavier, he is one of the world's most powerful mutants - considering his name, he unsurprisingly harnesses the power of magnetism - but one with a bona fide vision of a new world order: Mutants, or Homo superior, taking their rightful place atop the hierarchy after years of being oppressed by inferior humans with homo-superior phobia.

This doesn't come out of some random megalomania; before he became Magneto, Erik Lehnsherr was just a person of prodigious, burgeoning gifts whose worldview was permanently altered by tragedies. In this way, he bears comparison to none other than Hannibal Lecter - like him a Holocaust survivor - in his devaluation of human life. Eventually Magneto will choose war with Homo sapiens to defend the very existence of mutantkind.

"I suppose in some ways there are heroic elements within him. There is a decent individual at the core of it all," says Michael Fassbender, who for "X-Men: First Class" takes over the role originated in the Singer films by Ian McKellen. The new movie is set about 40 years before those others, when Erik and Charles first meet and become close friends - until their divergent views of mutant-human relations cause an unfixable rift between them.

"There was so much history in the character, so much reference material, that I could definitely have a picture in mind. Right from the first scene, I know what his very strong, clear objective is. It's quite easy to make choices because of that," says Fassbender.

"The fact that he is a Holocaust survivor, that he did try to live a normal life and there was the death of his child and his subsequent revenge and therefore, essentially, his mistrust of the human race; you can see where it's coming from. It's justified to some point. A lot of what he says makes sense. A lot of (his dire predictions of human treatment of mutants) happen. He's more of a realist than Charles, even if he is a cynic."

The new film, directed by Matthew Vaughn ("Kick-Ass"), boasts established stars Kevin Bacon, Rose Byrne and January Jones, along with rising talents Nicholas Hoult, Zoë Kravitz, Oscar nominee Jennifer Lawrence and Bill Milner. James McAvoy plays telepath Charles Xavier/Professor X as the headstrong young man he was before he became the ultra-calm, shiny-pated, wheelchair-using father figure to nascent superheroes such as Cyclops and Rogue.

"First Class" has the cool factor for fans of an origin story featuring favorites not previously captured onscreen (the Hellfire Club, Banshee and Havok among them) and the cool factor for everyone else of its 1962 setting - the clothes, the Cold War and Cuban missile crisis, and just a little bit of retro-Bond flavor.

"Yeah, that was something Matthew said early on when we met up, the sort of tone he had in mind," says Fassbender when told of his director's description of the actor's performance as having a little bit of young Connery in it.

"Definitely when you put on the clothes, you do feel it, whether you're in '300' or some sort of period piece, it always helps to be wearing some sort of garment that takes you to that era. But when we were talking about the actual voice of the character, when we decided not to go down the Ian McKellen route, he said what he liked about my voice was that it was a little bit sort of off. And that's what he thought Connery had that was sort of interesting, and he wanted me to keep that flavor and just take the Irishness out of it."

Created by Marvel gods Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, Magneto debuted in the first-ever appearance of the X-Men (X-Men No. 1, 1963) and has gone on to bedevil them for decades. The unorthodox heroes were ahead of the curve from the start; they often served as a vehicle for social commentary then not common in the genre.

"What I found really interesting about the comic books, not having known anything about them, is their whole idea of the outcasts, people who are not accepted by society for whatever reason - skin color, sexual preference, whatever," says Fassbender. "It's something that has always been very prevalent in society, and this idea that it's set against the backdrop of the civil rights movement of the '60s - I found those things very interesting."

Perhaps influenced by the new story's setting, Fassbender has compared Charles and Erik's disparate approaches to the mutant-human conflict as akin to Martin Luther King Jr.'s and Malcolm X's methods.

" 'By whatever means necessary,' yes, I do think that works," says Fassbender. "Erik is very much a Machiavellian character: 'The end justifies the means': Unless you cause some kind of financial disruption or take some offensive action, then you will never make progress. Charles is more of the belief that if you accentuate the positive and try as much as you can to help the other side, that is the way forward. You would have to say that Charles' is the long man's route because that's not happening in the near future." {sbox}

X-Men: First Class (PG-13) opens Friday at Bay Area theaters.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 2:15 am

http://www.usmagazine.com/momsbabies/news/january-jones-x-men-costars-shell-be-a-great-mom-2011265

January Jones' X-Men Costars: She'll Be a Great Mom!
1306434385_xmen-290.jpg

Credit: Gary Gershoff/WireImage.com

Thursday – May 26, 2011 – 4:34pm

At Wednesday night's X-Men: First Class premiere in NYC, the action flick's cast was gushing over their co-star, January Jones,' pregnancy.

PHOTOS: Summer movie preview

"It's great!" Rose Byrne told Us Weekly on the red carpet.

A rep for Jones, 33, told Us last month that the star "is happy to announce that she is expecting her first child this fall."

PHOTOS: What these celebs love about motherhood

Michael Fassbender, who plays Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto in the action flick, went into more detail about his co-star.

"She's a fantastic person," the 34-year-old actor told Us. "She's very sweet. Just in the experience of working with her, she sort of gets up and gets on with it, and I think she'll probably do the same in motherhood."

PHOTOS: The Hollywood baby boom

And while her co-stars Byrne, Fassbender, James McAvoy, Kevin Bacon, and Lucas Till were positive for the mom-to-be, they also kept mum on who the father is.

"You know you can't ask me that!" laughed Bacon, who plays Sebastian Shaw.

The Mad Men actress, who plays Emma Frost in X-Men: First Class, is keeping the details of her pregnancy private, including the identify of her unborn baby's father. This will be her first child.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 2:43 am

http://screenrant.com/xmen-first-class-cast-interviews-benm-117326/

‘X-Men: First Class’ Cast on Rushed Schedules, Comic Book Research & Bad Posters
May 26, 2011 by Ben Moore

The cast of ‘X-Men: First Class’ sat down to talk about all things X-Men – including comic book source material, worries about the rushed X-prequel and those terrible photoshopped posters.

The Cast of X-Men First Class Discusses the Movie

X-Men: First Class hits theaters in a little over a week and it’s already experiencing overwhelmingly positive buzz and reviews from those who’ve seen it. Unless the public has an entirely different reaction to it (which, as always, is 100% possible), it’s starting to look like the X-prequel will be a huge success.

It was obvious in the twenty-five minute press conference yesterday that the First Class cast got along extremely well, as they were making lighthearted jokes at everyone’s expense and generally having a great time together.

“Everyone on [X-Men: First Class] was so cool,” said Zoe Kravitz, whose dad Lenny will star in The Hunger Games next year along with First Class co-star Jennifer Lawrence. “Honestly, I think if I was here with a bunch of Hollywood – excuse my French – ass*****, it would’ve been intimidating and [an] awful experience, but if everyone’s there to make a good film, and everyone’s down to Earth, and everyone’s there for the right reasons, [the scale of the film] doesn’t really matter.”

Kevin Bacon was flabbergasted that he’d even been offered a role on First Class. “I don’t know if this says something about my self-esteem, but the first thing I said when I was offered [the role of Sebastian Shaw] was, ‘Who fell out?’”

To which everyone within earshot bellowed a half-minute-long “Awww,” followed by Michael Fassbender saying, “It was Brian Dennehy.”

Asked if she had ‘power-envy’ playing the totally human CIA agent Moira MacTaggart, Rose Byrne said, “At the time it was – it was good, because I didn’t have to go to makeup so early. I’d be like, ‘Oh, I have to get up at six,’ and Nicholas Hoult [who plays the heavily make-uped Beast] would be like, ‘I got here at 2 o’clock in the morning.’ That’s – you win, [Nicholas]! You win.”

Beast X-Men First Class movie trailer

Hoult as Beast in 'X-Men: First Class'

James McAvoy immediately interjected to say, “Your character does have the mutant power of immaculate hair at all times.”

McAvoy and Fassbender even brainstormed names for January Jones’ unborn baby, including Little Magneto, Magneto Jr., Little Banshee, and Riptide. “Riptide needs his nappy changed!” said McAvoy.

This sort of comradery was apparent in the film, as well, especially with regard to James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender. We’ve heard tell of Professor X and Magneto’s initial friendship ad nauseum – in the comic books, in the cartoons, in the previous films, and so forth – but rarely have we seen it depicted; or, for that matter, depicted so well.

The strength of First Class rests squarely on McAvoy, Fassbender, and their effortless chemistry together as two great friends with diametrically opposed views.

It’s interesting that, despite the fact that X-Men: First Class is in many ways a departure from the canon of the comic books, some of the actors researched their roles based specifically on the comic books. Though Michael Fassbender initially considered studying the physicality and speech patterns of a young Ian McKellan, director Matthew Vaughn immediately nixed that idea – so Fassbender instead relied upon the “biography” and “well-rounded character” information from the comic books.

Michael Fassbender Hanging Onto Jet in X-Men: First Class

McAvoy and Fassbender as Xavier and Magneto in 'First Class'

So, too, did Kevin Bacon, who realized that he looked nothing like his comic book counterpart:

“[Sebastian Shaw] is a gigantic, muscle-bound guy with a ponytail, and he dresses like George Washington – with britches and all this kind of stuff. […] That being said, it was from the comic books, as Michael mentioned earlier, that most of the research came. I learned […] about where he grew up, his relationship to his father, his relationship to his wife, who died, who got killed, and all this kind of stuff was extremely helpful […] in terms of creating the character.”

James McAvoy spoke rather bluntly about how worried he was that the film would be a mess – due to the rushed production and the extended shoot – that he immediately phoned Michael Fassbender to let him how good it was once he saw it.

“I phoned Michael within about half an hour [of watching First Class] just to go, ‘Dude, you just – you’ve got to just see it quick because you’re going to be relieved. You’re going to be able to go to the toilet again properly.’ You know, we were worried, man. These things – sometimes they’re a nightmare to make. And it’s well-documented that [First Class] was, there’s no point in hiding it. But, uh – it’s turned out really good. I think we always thought it could be really different and really brilliant, or really bad and really … different.”

The cast even made fun of the universally mocked posters that have been released by Fox Marketing in anticipation of the film’s release. “One thing I sort of saw on the blog,” said Fassbender, “one fan wrote that the poster looks like a Sears catalogue. I thought that was pretty funny.”

X-Men First Class Poster Looks Like a Sears Catalog

One of the posters we'd like to forget.

James McAvoy had a similar experience. “One fan actually said we had pigeon feet, and then I looked at the poster and went, ‘****, we really [do] have pigeon feet.’”

When asked if the cast is up for a possible sequel to First Class, McAvoy said, “Yeah, you never want to pass up on a chance to make money. So if we make money on this one, I’m sure we’ll be back,” [in his sarcastic 'movie trailer guy' voice] “next summer!”

X-Men: First Class hits theaters June 3rd, 2011.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 3:17 am

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/05/27/PK7I1JGT3R.DTL

'X-Men' shows how 'First Class' friendship mutates

Michael Ordoña, Special to The Chronicle

Friday, May 27, 2011

Photo: Murray Close

"First Class" tracks Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender, front left) and Charles Xavier (James McAvoy).

"First Class" tracks Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender, ...Michael Fassbender's Magneto envisions a new world order. View Larger Images

There are scheming supergeniuses and impossibly ripped dudes in colorful tights - and then there are complex antagonists who make you reconsider even the good guys' positions. The uninitiated probably think of comic-book bad guys as the hypermuscular mustache twirlers who must have all the money or rule the world, mwah ha ha ha, because they're so very, very evil.

And then there's Magneto. Until Bryan Singer's "X-Men" movies, most people who don't buy comics had probably never heard of him. Even Paul McCartney fans might not have been aware of whom the heck his song "Magneto and Titanium Man" was about. But in the Marvel Universe, he's a major attraction.

At the opposite pole from X-Men leader Charles Xavier, he is one of the world's most powerful mutants - considering his name, he unsurprisingly harnesses the power of magnetism - but one with a bona fide vision of a new world order: Mutants, or Homo superior, taking their rightful place atop the hierarchy after years of being oppressed by inferior humans with homo-superior phobia.

This doesn't come out of some random megalomania; before he became Magneto, Erik Lehnsherr was just a person of prodigious, burgeoning gifts whose worldview was permanently altered by tragedies. In this way, he bears comparison to none other than Hannibal Lecter - like him a Holocaust survivor - in his devaluation of human life. Eventually Magneto will choose war with Homo sapiens to defend the very existence of mutantkind.

"I suppose in some ways there are heroic elements within him. There is a decent individual at the core of it all," says Michael Fassbender, who for "X-Men: First Class" takes over the role originated in the Singer films by Ian McKellen. The new movie is set about 40 years before those others, when Erik and Charles first meet and become close friends - until their divergent views of mutant-human relations cause an unfixable rift between them.

"There was so much history in the character, so much reference material, that I could definitely have a picture in mind. Right from the first scene, I know what his very strong, clear objective is. It's quite easy to make choices because of that," says Fassbender.

"The fact that he is a Holocaust survivor, that he did try to live a normal life and there was the death of his child and his subsequent revenge and therefore, essentially, his mistrust of the human race; you can see where it's coming from. It's justified to some point. A lot of what he says makes sense. A lot of (his dire predictions of human treatment of mutants) happen. He's more of a realist than Charles, even if he is a cynic."

The new film, directed by Matthew Vaughn ("Kick-Ass"), boasts established stars Kevin Bacon, Rose Byrne and January Jones, along with rising talents Nicholas Hoult, Zoë Kravitz, Oscar nominee Jennifer Lawrence and Bill Milner. James McAvoy plays telepath Charles Xavier/Professor X as the headstrong young man he was before he became the ultra-calm, shiny-pated, wheelchair-using father figure to nascent superheroes such as Cyclops and Rogue.

"First Class" has the cool factor for fans of an origin story featuring favorites not previously captured onscreen (the Hellfire Club, Banshee and Havok among them) and the cool factor for everyone else of its 1962 setting - the clothes, the Cold War and Cuban missile crisis, and just a little bit of retro-Bond flavor.

"Yeah, that was something Matthew said early on when we met up, the sort of tone he had in mind," says Fassbender when told of his director's description of the actor's performance as having a little bit of young Connery in it.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 3:25 am

http://uk.movies.yahoo.com/blog/article/177226/the-x-men-speak-out-which-mutant-power-would-you-have.html

The X-Men speak out: Which mutant power would you have?

Mon May 09 12:39PM by Joe Utichi

Putting the cast of 'X-Men: First Class' to the test, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne, Jason Flemyng, Nicholas Hoult, Jennifer Lawrence, Alex Gonzalez, Edi Gathegi, Zoe Kravitz, Lucas Till and Caleb Landry Jones pick the mutant powers they’d have if they could.

James McAvoy (Charles Xavier/Professor X) – "Erik’s is such a good power, but at the same time I’m not that impressed with a man that can bend metal. It doesn’t speak to me of drama. I’d love, love, love anything that was to do with flying. There’s not much else you can wish for in life if you can pop down to the shops and not get stopped by the traffic. And I’d quite like to be able to heal people as well, like Elixir. We nearly had Elixir in this film, but ultimately we chose not to. I think it made everything quite hard to have real drama and sense of impending fatality if somebody could just heal people."

Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto) – "I think the power to speak different languages. Is that a superpower? A tail would be kind of cool. You can balance and stuff with a tail. Be like a monkey. Or just for climbing, you know. Flying’s pretty amazing, but you could fly with a tail… From tree to tree, like spider monkeys. Tail Man. Tail-linguist. Flying’s the obvious one - it’s like that thing of what animal you’d be if you could be any animal. It would be a bird, because flight is the one thing we can't do."

Rose Byrne (Moira MacTaggart) – "I’d like a combination. I’d like Charles's power to read and to block people’s minds, but then I’d also love Angel Salvadore’s power to acid vomit! I think that’d be useful. You’re saying to the AD, "Where’s my cup of tea?" Boom! Your reputation might be a bit ruined. You might burn a few bridges. Literally. Maybe just the threat of it – just a side spew so they could see what you’ve got… But yeah, I think a combination of a few of them would be really cool."

Jason Flemyng (Azazel) – "It would be Maestro – which means I can charge up anyone’s credit card with the power of my mind. Or Oystro, for the tube. Or Alphabetico, which means it could be books or DVDs or music libraries, and I can just alphabetize them like that. Oystro – the lamest X-Men of all time. I just love the idea of lame superpowers. People can do amazing things like teleport and stuff, but with something like this it’s still a power, it’s just rubbish."

Nicholas Hoult (Hank McCoy/Beast) – "The one I have in the film's pretty cool. Even just to be able to have an opposable big toe and to be able to do things with your feet would be great. But this is a really difficult question. Obviously being invisible would be great. Flying would be great. But there are better ones, probably, than that. I’d like to be able to control people’s destinies… That kind of sounds like I want to be God, doesn’t it? I want to be God! There we go. I just spit that out and realised in hindsight that was a ridiculous thing to say! I’d quite like morphing – Mystique’s one – actually. That’s quite cool."

Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkholme/Mystique) - "Don’t I have to say shape shifting? I would love to be able to run up stairs without falling, but I don’t think that’s a superhero power. Every time I run up stairs I fall, it’s the weirdest thing ever. Basic human balance. Well, Zoe can fly. Flying would be awesome. But it has to be cooler than flying… Well, if I could fly it would solve my running up the stairs and tripping problem, because I could just fly up the stairs… So I’m sticking with that. And sharpening pencils with my eyes."

Edi Gathegi (Armando Muñoz/Darwin) – "I’ll tell you a story – I was an 'X-Men' fan growing up. I woke up every Saturday morning and I was glued to the TV when the 'X-Men' cartoon was on. And when the movie came out I loved it. It was the best superhero reimagining that I’d ever seen. I loved the 'X-Men' series. But Wolverine was the guy I loved when I was a kid. For some reason – the adamantium, the swagger, it was all about Wolverine. My character’s relatively new – he was created maybe five years ago – and if my character were around when I was a kid, he’d definitely be my favourite character. I tell you what the powers are and you go, ‘Wait a minute, that’s awesome.’ He wasn’t around when I was a kid, but if he were it’d be all about Darwin."

Zoe Kravitz (Angel Salvadore/Tempest) – "I think it’d be flying. I really think I have the best power. Doesn’t everyone want to fly? It’s like the coolest thing ever. And I projectile vomit acid!"

Lucas Till (Alex Summers/Havok) – "It’s a tossup. I think you would want something like Shaw’s power, where he can absorb kinetic energy and throw it back at something. That’s all-powerful. But you also want a little style with it, like Magneto. It’s not just all-powerful - he can bend metal and that’s it - but there’s a lot of things you can manipulate with that. I’ve always loved Magneto’s power."

Caleb Landry Jones (Sean Cassidy/Banshee) – "I wonder how many people have said teleportation… That’s probably the best, I think. I’d be rich; I’d have travelled the world, possibly space. I could do all sorts of things with it."

What superpower would you like to have?
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 3:42 am

http://willbertine.blogspot.com/2011/05/x-men-first-class-press-conference.html

Friday, 27 May 2011
'X-Men: First Class' Press Conference 23rd May 2011

Written for Screenjabber Magazine.

Attending the X-Men First Class press conference was a great chance for Screenjabber to see the main draws of Marvel’s latest blockbuster, where James McAvoy, Kevin Bacon, Michael Fassbender, Jason Flemyng, Zoe Kravitz, Alex Gonzalez and writer Jane Goldman patiently answered the questions most on the mind of the press. The conference allowed the actors to let their jovial banter really shine through, and it’s clear to hear the friendships forged whilst making the movie. The topic of discussion lends towards the possibility of making a trilogy out of Matthew Vaughn’s first major foray into Hollywood territory, and the lengths of research each actor went through to truly understand their character. Kevin Bacon noted that he “didn’t grow up so much with comics”, but “knew the films” and like the rest of the cast, was given a bible of research to wade through. James McAvoy however was a “big fan” and “really aware of the cartoon growing up” having seen many of the episodes via the BBC’s Saturday morning children’s show Live and Kicking. He even patiently waited for each half of the cartoon to air throughout the rest of the show. Clearly comfortable to joke with friends, comically Zoe Kravitz was apparently not aware of the comic prior to the shoot.

With a grasp of who was and was not aware of the movie’s origins, the latest X-Men is based predominantly on the Marvel comics, but with a conscious approach to how this prequel will fit into the pre-existing X Men movie franchise. The latest movie develops heavier themes to the forefront of blockbuster cinema, including race, war, discrimination and prejudice. Whilst many of these themes have been touched on before, X-Men First Class has a weight of quality to it, establishing and really developing the human unity between the two lead characters, Professor X and Magneto, which we already know to be a fractured relationship from the previous instalments, played by Sir Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen respectfully.

Jason Flemyng, considered by many to be Matthew Vaughn’s lucky charm, having appeared in the majority of his movies, became the go to man for the comic relief both on set and at the conference, having originally thought to audition for the beast when Vaughn “flirted with doing one of the other X-Men films” prior to First Class, but as Michael Fassbender added, he “didn’t look so good in blue” as he does in red, so rather then being blue and hairy, Flemyng is “bright red and slightly out of focus”.

A strong cast and an equally strong movie to match, X-Men: First Class is definitely one to check out for a number of reasons. The great character development takes you deeper into the realms of mutants not yet explored by the previous movies, along with the visuals completely capturing a time of war and social change not long forgotten. There’s also an emotional pull that is neither contrived nor forced. It’s an undeniable fact that although Matthew Vaughn has dabbled in a number of genres, his latest is definitely one of his, and Jane Goldman’s, greatest assault at the box office yet.
Posted by Willemyn at Friday, May 27, 2011
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 6:34 pm

http://www.bostonherald.com/blogs/entertainment/hollywood_mine/?p=558

The goofy guys of ‘First Class’

Forget the fighting, the rivalry, the special effects of X-Men: First Class. The franchise’s new stars James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender would make a great comedy team.

The two actors, the Scots McAvoy and the German-born, Irish raised Fassbender play younger versions of, respectively, Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellan in First Class, a prequel. They were goofily endearing as they sat next to each at a press conference yesterday at the Ritz Carlton Central Park in Manhattan, surrounded by castmates January Jones, Kevin Bacon, Zoe Kravitz, Rose Byrne and Lucas Till.
Q: IT’S A BIG CAST TO KIND OF ALL FEEL THAT KIND OF (WARM) RELATIONSHP. I’M WONDERING IF IT WAS AN INSTANT CONNECTION OR JUST FROM WORKING TOGETHER YOU JUST KIND OF FELL INTO EACH OTHER?
McAVOY: I fell into Michael the first day and the rest was beautiful. It just happened, I didn’t mean it. It just felt right.

Q: HOW DID YOU DEVELOP THAT RAPPORT IS WHAT I MEANT?
FASSBENDER: Oh, it just happened. We didn’t mean it. We ended up changing helmets, you know. And rubbing helmets a lot and you get to know one another on a very intimate level.
McAVOY: You do. You do. And then that bond is broken and suddenly he’s not calling me anymore. He’s doing Prometheus. Man, we shared something.
FASSBENDER: Come over later and fall into my helmet.

Q: I’M JUST CURIOUS IF YOU GUYS HAVE HAD ANY FAN INTERACTION YET? ANY FUN STORIES OR CRAZY ENCOUNTERS OR ANYTHING?
JONES: With the comic? No.
McAVOY: No.
FASSBENDER: I remember the one thing I sort of saw on the blog was one fan wrote the poster looks like a Sears catalog. I thought it was pretty funny.
McAVOY: Yeah, one fan actually said we had pigeon feet and then I looked at the poster and it made me think, ‘I have pigeon feet.’

Since First Class is set in the early ‘60s, there’s a bit of humor in not doing the high tech trappings of most superhero movies. Kevin Bacon’s high tech lair has a black and white television. McAvoy particularly enjoyed their version of, he said, “Cerebro, that thing that’s always in the X-Men movies as kind of like the Death Star of the X-Men. We have our own version of Cerebro in this movie. Whereas in the other movies it’s all very sleek and shiny and it looks like you got it at IKEA, this one looks like it’s got lollipops sticking out of it.”

He smiled, “One of the good things about the film is the designers- it’s kind of kitsch.”

As for the cast’s reaction, McAvoy saw First Class first and “within a half hour” phoned Fassbender. “I said, ‘Dude, you’ve got to just see it quick because you’re going to be relieved. You’re going to be able to go to the toilet again.’”

Features on the X-Men: First Class stars will run in the Herald next week prior to its June 3 opening.

This entry was posted on Thursday, May 26th, 2011 at 1:21 pm
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sat May 28, 2011 7:12 pm

http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Article/x-men-first-class-interviews-021243023561833

20th Century Fox
Hanging with the X-Men
by Glen Ferris on May 28, 2011

While the last two X-Men flicks – Wolverine and The Last Stand – failed to set fans’ pulses racing, the franchise is now back in safe hands thanks to British director Matthew Vaughn, as he takes the saga to the 60s to chronicle the first time future enemies Charles Xavier (aka Professor X) and Erik Lehnsherr (aka Magneto) met.

Drawing inspiration from the early Bond films (and a little bit of Austin Powers), this shot-in-the-arm for the series is pure blockbuster gold as the Cuban Missile Crisis provides the perfect setting for our heroic mutants to team up for the first time as they attempt defeat a common enemy with genocide on his mind.

Glen Ferris sat down for a chat with the film’s stars, James McAvoy, (Professor Charles Xavier), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lensherr) and the big baddie of the piece, Kevin Bacon (Sebastian Shaw).

James and Michael, you’re both playing an iconic character who’s been played by an iconic actor, Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen respectively. How did you approach the character?
James McAvoy: “I tried to assassinate the icon, I suppose. I tried to change him on purpose. He was slightly different in the script anyway and I said to Matthew [Vaughn], ‘Can we push this even further? Because otherwise there’s very little for me to do than to just ape previous performances from a great actor.’ For me there was no point in doing a prequel if the character is just the same. So showing him as a different person was my whole thing I guess. If we make more movies, if we get that far, we will probably see me playing something much closer to Sir Patrick.”

Michael Fassbender: “Obviously, there is the pressure that the character has such a huge following and Ian McKellen did such a fine job in the first trilogy, but you just have to sort of forget about that and get stuck into the work. I had so much in the comic-book source material to formulate my performance that there was more than enough material for me to be getting on with. You just have to try and do something that’s honest to the material, but also your own take on it, and hope that fans will be happy with it.”

Michael, Magneto is much more of a badass here than we’ve seen in later incarnations. There’s a touch of Connery-era Bond in there too. Was it fun to get involved in that?
MF: “Matthew said to me at the start of filming that he really liked the idea of those early Bond films. While I didn’t have the Bond theme going around my head in my trailer, I concentrated on the comic books and the severe childhood that Erik had that allowed me to develop this bad-ass character, as you put it. It was very clear to me what objective he had at the start; he’s got a mission and he’s uncompromising in his journey to achieve that. He’s a very Machiavellian character who truly believes that the end justifies the means.”

James, you do get to have a lot more fun in this movie than we’re used to seeing from Professor X…
JM: “Well, you’d have to ask Sir Patrick, I don’t know what floats his boat. I personally had a lot of fun making this film. I enjoy playing people who think they’re funny and who think they’re good at flirting – in this incarnation, Professor Charles Xavier thinks he’s good at both. He’s got some decent chat-up lines but he’s also got an unfair advantage, he’s like (illusionist) Derren Brown using all his tricks to get someone into bed – Derren Brown’s really cool by the way.”

Kevin, your character is new to the X-Men movies. Tell us about him…
Kevin Bacon: “I play Sebastian Shaw and he’s a billionaire and a very powerful guy both in terms of his influence on the world and his mutant powers. He’s trying to create a utopian society where mutants rule the world without the problems of having humans hanging around.”

How was it playing the bad guy?
KB: “I think the thing about any bad guy that I would like to play is that they don’t think of themselves as bad guys. If you start out with a performance where you choose to play someone as just plain bad, I think it could all go wrong. He’s charming and manipulative and at the same time he really does love mutants. Yes he wants to be the leader but he does so because he believes they’re threatened by humanity and they’re special. When approaching it, you have to go in there with all your guns blazing and feel like what you’re doing is right.”

James, although you’ve dipped your toes into the world of comic-book movies before with Wanted, you’re best known for your independent films. Were you surprised when you were approached for this film?
James McAvoy: “Yeah, I’m generally surprised when anybody offers me more work!”

Kevin, we don’t get to see you in too many genre films these days. What was it about this movie that made you want to get involved?
Kevin Bacon: “Well, it’s the same thing that would draw me to any film, I just really liked the character and found him fascinating and complex. I was a fan of the other X-Men films and I thought the way they chose to go back and think about the genesis of this group of people was really kind of brilliant and I loved Matthew Vaughn’s previous films.”

Michael, there’s a scene in the film set in an Argentinian pub spoken in German that very reminiscent of the bar scene in Inglorious Basterds. Was that a bit of an in-joke?
MF: “I was aware of it when we were doing it but that’s down to Matthew and the way that he played the scene out. I think we just wanted to find the fun element in that scene and that was a way of drawing tension out before it all kicked off. I think Tarantino’s a master at doing that and I had to have a giggle to myself about it when I first heard about the scene.”

Are you comic-book fans?
James McAvoy: “Erm, I don’t think they’re a bad thing, but I’ve never actually sat down and read a comic book. Actually, that’s a lie, I read the Dan Dare Christmas annual in maybe 1990 and I had a few Teenage Ninja Mutant Ninja Turtles comics when I was a kid but that was it. There weren’t that many comics around when I was growing up.”

Kevin Bacon: “I understand where they’re coming from 100% but I’m not a comic-book fan. I didn’t really grow up reading comic books, well I guess I did but it didn’t last beyond the age of 10. But I really do understand it and I appreciate that both the film-makers and the studio feels the need to deliver something that would be cool for that kind of core audience.”

Michael Fassbender: “I am, after getting involved in this film but I never really was as a child or through my adult life either. But because I did 300 I was introduced to the work of Frank Miller and then I delved into the X-Men comic books for this film and I really liked the themes they explore.”
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Sun May 29, 2011 10:38 pm

http://www.3news.co.nz/X-Men-team-is-First-Class/tabid/418/articleID/213198/Default.aspx

X-Men team is First Class
Mon, 30 May 2011 1:59p.m.

James McAvoy stars alongside Michael Fassbender and Kevin Bacon in X-Men: First Class - one of this year's biggest superhero blockbusters.

The action adventure unveils in more depth the beginnings of the X-Men saga - with a secret history of the Cold War.

As the first rate team discover and come to terms with their considerable powers, alliances are formed that will shape the never-ending battle between the heroes and villains of the X-Men universe.

It is during this period that the world's most capable psychic, Charles Xavier (McAvoy), first meets Erik Lehnsherr (Fassbender), a man with the ability to master magnetism.

Before they took the names Professor X and Magneto, the characters portrayed in the later movies, set in a latter day time scale, by Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen respectively, they were two young men struggling to control their powers.

Michael Fassbender describes the relationship between the two characters: "The fact that Charles is such a gifted mutant in terms of his understanding of the powers, the potential of the various powers within each mutant. I think you know the very fact that Eric wouldn't have reach his full potential if it wasn't for Charles and Magneto might have never been born, his full sort of glory, if it wasn't down to Charles, just you know showing him the true power and potential of his gift."

Directed and co-written by British film-maker Matthew Vaughan, X-Men: First Class features a cast from both sides of the Atlantic.

Kevin Bacon stars as nefarious mutant Sebastian Shaw who, he says, is pretty interesting.

"I like the character in that because he's evil. I like the character because he's fascinating and complex and you know I never really look at something and go 'oh this is going to be great because he's the bad guy.' It's more about 'is there something there for me to do?' "

James McAvoy says the prequel is a world away from the previous X-Men films.

"Our purpose was to not fit in a way, it was to be something different. Not just because it was set you know I think what 35 years, 40 years before the first movie happens but also because if it's the same then there is no point in doing it, it would be the same movie but with sixties costumes and that would be dumb wouldn't it?"

Although it may appear that he put in load of training for the film, Fassbender says looks can be deceptive: "Everybody thinks I have worked out, I don't know where that came from, I didn't really work out that much for this film there was no need to and because Magneto sort of fighting abilities aren't that great and it's actually one of his less effective sort of power if you like. I did a little bit of training just because there are some stunts work involved and you don't want to pull a muscle or anything but outside of that I didn't really have to."

Meanwhile McAvoy was pretty much jumping for joy when he found out there was no training necessary for his role: "What was the first thing I did when I knew I didn't have to work out for this role? Prayed to Jehovah, Buddha, Allah and the lot of them because it's not the most fun part of the day whenever I have to do that. Finding out that he was a 30 years old mature student who spent a lot of time down at the pub eating pickled eggs and drinking lots of ale I thought excellent man I don't need to get down to the gym, so yeah I thanked the many many gods of this land."

X-Men: First Class hits the big screen in New Zealand on Thursday.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Mon May 30, 2011 3:30 pm

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13719218

New 'X-Men' Film to Explore the Mutants' Origins

By GREGORY KATZ Associated Press
LONDON May 30, 2011 (AP)

They are a merry band of mutants, at least when the director is away and the hard work is done.

They've been given a task — concoct a "prequel" that will satisfy longtime fans of the "X-Men" series and bring in new moviegoers as well — and, with global release just a few days away, they think they've nailed it.

Much of the cast gathered in London recently to boast about the film — tastefully of course — at a round-table discussion that focused on the challenge of creating a credible early life for comic strip characters already portrayed successfully in four films by such masters as Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen, venerable English actors who carry the title "Sir" in front of their names.

This time, it's a much younger cast playing the mutants in their formative years, when they were still discovering and honing the special powers that set them apart from what they view as the rather drab human race. As a result, "X-Men: First Class" is filled with soul-searching identity crises as the mutants wrestle with a central dilemma: To downplay their differences in order to be accepted by humanity, or to celebrate what makes them unique, humanity be damned.

Instead of McKellen and Stewart in the key mutant roles of Magneto and Professor X, it's Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy, starting off as allies but ending up as bitter foes. The closest thing the cast has to eminence is Hollywood veteran Kevin Bacon, who plays evil mutant Sebastian Shaw with villainous glee.

Fassbender, a talented actor of German and Irish descent, said he did not feel hemmed in by earlier portrayals of Magneto, even if his approach doesn't appeal to fans of the earlier movies, which turned the old Marvel comic into a lucrative international film franchise that started with "X-Men" in 2000.

"I think we all realize there's a massive fan base out there and we definitely want them to like it," said Fassbender, seen in 2009's "Inglourious Basterds." ''They are the first sort of go-to audience, but there has to be a certain amount of disrespect for them as well, because you're trying to do something new. You're trying to make decisions that you think are justifiable and you have to forget about that or you can end up not making any bold choices. And I think we all made bold choices and took risks."

McAvoy, his voice still carrying a heavy hint of his native Scotland, said that means the new cast is to blame if the movie bombs — a fate that would sink plans for two additional "X-Men" prequels and a chance for the franchise to continue a few more years at least.

"It is intimidating because the four films made a lot of money, so clearly people like the characters enough to go and see them," said McAvoy, who starred in "The Last King of Scotland" and "Atonement." ''If it doesn't work, we take full blame."

He said his approach to Professor X was to show how different the character was as a very young man just discovering the range of his phenomenal telepathic powers. Director Matthew Vaughn had made it clear at the start of filming that he did not want McAvoy and Fassbender to simply portray younger versions of Stewart and McKellen.

Vaughn's approach meant developing an inner life and a back story for the characters, and playing them in the turmoil of youth, when their personalities are still being forged.

Fine, but isn't it a bit absurd working out a complex inner life for comic strip characters? A case of overkill in the motivation department?

No way, said Bacon, who handled Sebastian Shaw's sociopathic tendencies with care.

"You can never have too much back story," he said. "For me at least, if there's no back story in the movie then you look for some kind of source material, and if there's no source material, you make it up. You sit there and you write it: 'I was born in this town and this is what my daddy did, and here's my playlist of songs I like to listen to.' For me, that's what it's gotta be."

The film takes place in the 1960s — the height of the original Marvel comics era — and gives Bacon's character a key role in a highly fictionalized version of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. The plot device gives the director a chance to use actual footage of President Kennedy and Soviet hothead Nikita Krushchev, remembered for banging his shoe on a table during a spirited United Nations debate.

The '60s setting is exploited by the set and costume designers — the cleavage-boosting outfits worn by January Jones as Emma Frost are the most obvious examples — but they also provide a wistful quality to the mutants as they search for themselves.

"A lot of the characters are more innocent," said McAvoy. "Certainly my character is much more innocent, he's not tainted."

The youthful rebellion of that era is mirrored to some degree by the mutants, who can't decide whether to trust or obliterate the humans who seek their help.

Fassbender said the fans identify with the mutants' struggle for identity and respect. The new film shows how the young mutants find one another — and bond out of deep relief that they are not alone.

"It gives them hope to find other people are experiencing the same thing as they are," he said. "You know, it's a horrible feeling to think, oh my God, I'm on my own. I'm going through this by myself. But no, there are actually other people going through the same thing."

He said the genetic mutations are "the handicap that can actually become a special quality."

McAvoy's take is that the mutants all have terrible lives, full of angst and rage, but also find they are terribly special because of their secret abilities.

"That's the thing about every mutant, isn't it?" he said.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Mon May 30, 2011 3:51 pm

http://www.metronews.ca/edmonton/scene/article/874256--back-to-the-beginning-with-x-men-first-class

Back to the beginning with X-Men: First Class

X-Men: First Class, which opens Friday, tells the story of how Magneto (played by Michael Fassbender), right, turned against his friend Charles Xavier (James McAvoy).

METRO CANADA
Published: May 30, 2011 5:22 p.m.
Last modified: May 29, 2011 5:26 p.m.

It’s curious that while Hollywood seems to be making less movies in general, we are entering a summer that features no less than four big-budget superhero blockbusters — including this Friday’s release of X-Men: First Class.

“It’s probably down to the fact that maybe less people are going to the cinema and so they make films that are large in scale where you would want to go see it on a big screen,” offered star Michael Fassbender recently from New York.

“Genres take hold and they run for a while — I would say that’s one of the reasons (superhero movies hold up).”
It probably doesn’t hurt that X-Men: First Class is also the prequel to a very successful franchise that began as pulp fiction in 1963.

The beginning of the saga, X-Men: First Class features the original mutant superheroes and how the once-upright Magneto (Fassbender) turned against his friend Charles Xavier (James McAvoy).

“There’s such an incredible history there,” said McAvoy of the franchise’s legacy. “But the main thing that runs through all the X-Men saga — whether it’s the comic books, cartoon-form or movies — is that sense of the outsider being the character that you’re exploring ... that has to be one reason why it’s stuck around for so long.”

The previous films surely added fans to the franchise, as well.

However, McAvoy and Fassbender weren’t intimidated by expectations of portraying the respective roles that Ian McKellan and Patrick Stewart defined in the movies.

“I definitely watched the films,” said Fassbender.

“I was going to study Ian McKellan, perhaps as a young man and his movements, nuances, voice and then decided not to do that and just use the source material available in the comic books — to just take a totally fresh look at it, wipe the slate clean and go for something new.”
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:18 pm

http://www.moviefone.co.uk/2011/06/01/x-men-first-class-james-mcavoy-kevin-bacon-and-michael-fassbe/

X-Men: First Class: James McAvoy, Kevin Bacon and Michael Fassbender Interview
June 1, 2011 By: Sarah Dean

X-Men: First Class (in cinemas from today) is a fantastic, action-packed - but character-driven - origins story, that takes us back to the 60s, where the young Professor X and Magneto were friends, not enemies.

James McAvoy takes on the role immortalised by Sir Patrick Stewart, but with a more playful twist, while Michael Fassbender takes on the role played by Sir Ian McKellen, with almost a rogue James Bond-type quality.

Elsewhere, Kevin Bacon relishes the part of villainous Sebastian Shaw - a man determined to start WWIII.

We met up with the three actors - along with writer Jane Goldman and fellow mutants Alex Gonzalez (Riptide), Zoe Kravitz (who plays Angel) and the highly amusing Jason Flemyng (who is unrecognisable as Azazel) - at the London press conference for X-Men: First Class.

Here's what they had to say...

X Men First ClassHow familiar were you with the X-Men world before you started this film?

Kevin: I didn't grow up so much with the comics. I had a few, but it wasn't a big part of my childhood. I knew the films. One of the great things about working on the film was the day I got to Pinewood, the guys from Marvel came out with this gigantic bible of everything that had been drawn and written about Sebastian Shaw. That was about 75% of my research.

James: I was really aware of the cartoon when I was growing up. When I was 12-years-old they started showing it on Live and Kicking. They would do the thing where you'd watch the first half of the cartoon then they'd make you wait an hour and fifteen minutes before they'd show you the second half. I was a big fan of that, and the first couple of films.

Jason: Matt flirted with doing one of the other X-Men films earlier on, so I was aware of them. I was considered for Beast, but that didn't happen. So instead of being big, blue and hairy, I'm red and slightly out of focus!

Were you inspired by the film actors, or did you take it from the comic books?

James: The comic book history is really different from all the X-Men movies that have come before, and even the cartoon to a certain extent. In the comic books, my character is American, and fortunately, they decided to make that character English when they cast Sir Patrick Stewart, which was a masterstroke of casting. So I watched the films, with the knowledge it was going to be a prequel, so it had to be different. The franchise needed something new. There's no point having the same character played the same way, in a different suit, because it just doesn't validate the movie. I took a lot of notes on Sir Patrick's performance, but it was more about seeing how I could make it different. So where Patrick was wise, I'd be foolhardy, where he was chaste, I'd be randy. If we make any money, and make three films, I'll end up doing something much more like Sir Patrick. It was really important to start in a different place, but taking the cues from his performance.
X-MEN: FIRST CLASSMichael: In the beginning, I started studying Ian McKellen, getting my hands on anything I could where he was a young man on screen, studying his physicality and voice and whatnot. Then I sat down with with Matthew, and we decided that wasn't the way he wanted to go. So at that point I ditched that idea completely and used the comic book material that was available. I was spoilt as there was so much there in the character's biography.

Jane, how hard was it to get a seamless history for an origins story?

Jane: I think it would be impossible to write any story that fits in with every single part of the X-Men universe, because even the comics have different timelines, and each artist did their own take. The films have their own world as well. I don't think there's any storyline I could write that could fit in seamlessly with the movie world and every iteration of the comic world. The aim was to tell a good story but be respectful of the material and be true to the spirit of it.

James: One of the things that always runs through the X-Men movies is that they're about us - people who feel like outsiders, who have a certain amount of self-loathing perhaps. People who are afraid of themselves, don't like themselves, want to be normal, or rejoice in the fact that they aren't normal. That's one of the key elements you managed to put in there.

James, there's a nice moment when you hint that you might go bald. How do you think that may be addressed?

James: He either shaves it or he loses it, we don't know how. In the source material, he loses it the day his powers activate themselves when he was quite young. We decided not to do that. When spend time in this movie explaining why he can't walk, so maybe we'll see how he loses his hair in another movie. Because we haven't taken the explanation given in the comic books, we need to come up with a really good character-driven, narrative-essential reason. We can't just start a new movie with a new look. We need to embrace the change.

Kevin, you're already a superhero to your many fans - what was it like playing a mutant?

Kevin: It was great. It's great to be a mutant. It's the first time I've played a mutant. If you look at this movie, aside from the power and the mutations, compared to many other comic book characters, they are extremely human in the way that they feel things, they get jealous, they feel hate and fear, and get drunk together. I think that was the challenge from an acting standpoint - to forget about your powers, as that will be taken care of. To constantly bring it back to "who am I on the human side?" For me, I've never played a billionaire playboy megalomaniac, so that was cool!

How relieved were you that you didn't have Sebastian Shaw's sideburns?

Kevin: A lot of people asked me about the responsibility to fans of the comic books, and there is one. I hope there won't be too much disappointment about the fact I don't look anything like Sebastian Shaw. When I first read the script, I went online and googled it. I saw this Lou Ferrigno-type guy with a ponytail dressed like George Washington. I thought, I just don't know how I'm going to do that! Luckily, for Matt, that wasn't the direction he wanted to go with. A lot of the things I've read about him was applicable whether or not he looks the way he does in the comics.

Can you talk about the physicality of the roles and the superpowers?

Kevin: Yeah, I mean, someone said to me today when I was talking about the look, the voice, the hair and the walk - they went "you make a decision about the walk?" of course I do - it's an integral part of who a person is, the way they move through this life. He's a very, very confident man.

Michael: I just thought, how can I physically represent constipation through my hand? That was my inspiration really. I didn't really know what to do. There was an element of me that felt like a bit of an idiot as a grown man trying to bend metal things with my hands. I wasn't even sure if I should physicalise it with my hands. The safety net was that Erik, at this point in his life, wasn't really sure how to harness these powers. So it is a little bit haphazard and random. It's only through meeting Charles that he unleashes his full potential. I was really happy when I watched the film, because I'd seen some of what Bill [Milner] had done with young Erik, which was amazing, but I hadn't seen any of the metal stuff. I was happy to see in the film how I was echoing what he had started off.

James: I saw what everyone else was doing and they got to do cool ninja stuff, really cool action, I don't get to do anything. So I thought I have to physicalise my power in some way, so I came up with the masterstroke of touching my temple. [laughter] I went through three months of intensive training with temple ninjas based in Dagenham. What I really like in films is that everybody is working on full power trying to get into the intensity of the emotions, but that the powers in the beginning are quite offhand - they're quite flippant. It wasn't like every time someone used a power, there was this "woosh" close-up special shot. It's much more part of their everyday life.

Jason: He's just trying to justify why his looks more like Carphone Warehouse than ninja.

Alex: Riptide can control the wind. It was helpful comparing him to a tornado. I don't know what I'm doing, talking in English for the first time in seven months... When you look at the tornado from afar, it's calm and lovely, but inside of the tornado is very fast. Riptide is the same thing - he looks very elegant, and he's calm in his suit, but inside of him everything is going very fast, and he's very aggressive. As violent as a tornado. Yes, I was about to throw up!

Zoe Kravitz Zoe: [The harnesses] were good. It does hurt after a while - it becomes painful around the crotch area. The happy parts were not so happy.

This film has attracted a more quality actor than other superhero films, why is that?

Michael: I dunno, Robert Downey Jr's a good actor.

Kevin: The Dark Knight? There was some good acting in that movie! This is the way I'll answer - for me, the chance to work with some of the finest young actors working today, who are either blowing up or about to blow up, was a thrill. It's just a kick-ass cast - no pun intended!

There are dual ideologies in this film, belonging to Charles and Erik - who's right?

Michael: That's your call. That's what interests me as an actor and as an audience member. Especially with big, commercial films, the audience is spoonfed the entire experience, and they don't have to do any work. I believe when you see a film, you should have to invest some of yourself in it as audience member. So when you leave the cinema, you should be having those conversations with either yourself, if you're crazy like me, or your friends afterwards. There should be an ambiguity - the grey area is what's interesting.

When you were younger was there anything you wanted to change about yourselves?

Michael: I had really bad acne when I was a teenager, so that was something I desperately wanted to get rid of.

Jason: This film is about prejudice and how people are perceived. Being in the minority of ginger-haired people - it's faded as I've got older, which is depressing - but my wife said that when she was asked about me when we got together, she said "he's ginger but he's really lovely." That's an indication of how people judge people without realising they're doing it.

Michael: Touching on what James said earlier, that idea of alienation is very prevalent in our society, and most people deal with it at some point in their life, unless they're a golden child. That's something we all need to address. Our race remains very tribal, and we haven't moved away from that over hundreds of years.

There's subtle Bond and 60s imagery. Michael and James, are you aware that you're the frontrunners for the next Bond?

James: I'll take myself out of the running for that immediately. I think this guy [Michael] does a great job in this film. It was never really my remit.

Michael: It's very flattering, and Matthew had mentioned in his meetings that it was the intention. For me, approaching the character of Erik, I didn't really go down that route. They dressed me up in bespoke suits that hark back to the early Bond films, but I really just approached it through the material in the comics.

What would be the worst superpower to have?

James: The power to control lead pencils.

Jason: Oystero! You can charge up your Oyster card by looking at it. Alphabetico! Look at your DVD collection and automatically alphabeticise it.

James and Michael, do you worry about how fame is going to affect your life?

James: I don't. People have been saying that to me since I did Narnia. What can you do? *I was lucky enough to work with Viggo Mortensen last year, and we walked all around Vienna wiyhout being noticed. *My guess this would be from Michael and there are the typos*

Michael: He was part of one of the biggest franchises in the world.

How distracting was January Jones' cleavage?

James: I had to rugby tackle January Jones' cleavage.

Michael: You try not to make her feel uncomfortable. It's a difficult scenario for her. She's dressed in skimpy clothes, and there are a plethora of fans that are all excited about the prospect of it. You're there working with her as a professional, and it wouldn't do well if you bought that kind of giddiness into the room.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

Post by Admin on Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:22 pm

http://collider.com/x-men-first-class-interview-january-jones-michael-fassbender-james-mcavoy/93884/

January Jones, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Kevin Bacon, Zoë Kravitz, Rose Byrne & Lucas Till Talk X-MEN: FIRST CLASS
by Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub Posted:June 1st, 2011 at 10:12 am

With director Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class opening this weekend, I recently attended a press conference in New York City with January Jones, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Kevin Bacon, Zoë Kravitz, Lucas Till and Rose Byrne. While some press conferences are filled with awful questions and boring answers, the cast was in great spirits and I found the almost thirty minute conversation quite interesting. They talked about why they wanted to be in the film, how they prepared to play their characters, what it was like to go back to the 60′s, the costumes, what they first thought when they found out they’d been cast, their reaction to seeing the finished film for the first time, what have the fans been telling them, and so much more. You can either read the transcript or listen to the audio after the jump.

And if you missed my thoughts on X-Men: First Class, here’s part of my mini-review:

“If you were nervous the latest chapter in the X-Men franchise might disappoint, I’m happy to report it’s a huge home-run. Everything from the great script to the awesome performances by the entire cast (with special mention to James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender) makes this X-Men film my favorite in the franchise. Also, the film is loaded with incredible action and a ton of Easter Eggs for the fans. Even the sets and costumes are great. Trust me, as soon as the movie is over, you’re going to wish the next chapter was coming out next week.”

As usual, I’m offering the interview two ways: you can either click here for the audio, or the full transcript is below. X-Men: First Class opens this weekend and it’s definitely recommended.

x-men-first-class-poster-logo-02Question: To start off, Michael and James, can you talk about taking these roles that were created previously, what your preparation was, whether you talked to Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen, etcetera.

Michael Fassbender: Obviously Sir Ian McKellen has done such a great job, and I was aware that fans of the X-Men comic book were very pleased with what he did. Initially I thought to myself, should I study a young Ian McKellen, study his voice and physicality. So I talked to Matthew about it, the first day or second day, and he wasn’t so keen on the idea. He wanted me to use my own voice and take it from there. We wiped the slate clean of that idea and I really delved into the comic books. There’s so much material there, and I was spoiled in terms of biography and putting together a complicated, well-rounded character.

James McAvoy: I felt a lot of ways the same. We talked for a brief couple of minutes in rehearsal about mimicking the voices and all that, and we had a good laugh about that, but it didn’t stay too long. I looked really closely at Sir Patrick’s performance, which I really enjoyed, but to validate just making these movies you have to make the characters different, otherwise it’s just the same performances with sexy suits. I tried to take the key points of his character and flip them. He’s a good guy, I couldn’t make him a bad guy, but where he was wise I was unwise, where he was chaste I was randy, and so on.

Were there any particular scenes in the movie in terms of going back to the 60s that you really enjoyed, and if you could go back to the 60s what would you have wanted to do. And for anyone who’s a comic aficionado, are there any in particular that you’re a fan of?

McAvoy: You’re a fan of the comic books, aren’t you Lucas?

Lucas Till: I wasn’t listening to the question. (There’s a lot of laughter, chatter and repeating the question here) I was a big fan of the animated series, because that’s what I grew up with. I like this movie because it showed me something I always wanted to see, which is Xavier and Magneto coming together as friends at the beginning. I wanted to see that history there, and that was cool for me. Also this new generation of new characters that they brought, which is something I want to see, I wanted to see new. I haven’t seen the movie yet guys, but I think it’s pretty good, right?

zoe-kravitz-x-men-first-class-movie-imageMcAvoy: Bang on, bang on. That’s the party line.

Were there any scenes specific to the 60s that you really enjoyed? You looked great in the white cap, January.

January Jones: Are you referring to the ere, the costumes? I enjoyed being a mutant. I never felt like I was in the 60s so much, and I think that’s something we were trying not to– you feel it in a stylized way but you weren’t overly conscious of it, at least the parts I was in. I had fun with the costumes and the sets and the vibe. I noticed it a lot in Zoe’s character, you incorporated it into your dialogue.

Zoe Kravitz: Like daddy-o. And you [gesturing to McAvoy] say groovy.

McAvoy: I say groovy twice. We did punch it in that scene.

Jones: That probably felt the most 60s.

Kevin Bacon: On the submarine, where there’s the little tiny black and white television you know. My pad is obviously going to be state of the art, and my sound system is like great vinyl–

Jones: And your lady.

Bacon: And my lady is state of the art. Until I trade her in for a younger model. [gestures to Kravitz] And my television is state of the art and it’s about this big [gestures about a foot]. I thought that was really fun. To me it was a big playground.

McAvoy: Cerebro,that things that’s always in the X-Men movies, it’s kind of like the Death Star of the X-Men. Our version of Cerebro, in this movie. In the other movie’s it’s very sleek and shiny, looks like you go to Ikea, this one it looks like it’s got lollipop sticking out of it. One of the good things about the film is the design is kind of kitsch. I don’t think we ever felt that we had to play it that much. it was all around us.

x-men-first-class-movie-poster-04Bacon: Matthew, one of the things that he screamed at me from the monitor one day, that I was going a little too 60s. And it’s interesting, because you kind of go– what kind of direction is that? How do I handle that? in fact, he was right. And it made a lot of sense to me. I got it. I don’t know, like I said I was starting to play some kind of idea rather than just being there and living it.

Hopefully you won’t playing William Shatner while you were doing it.

McAvoy: You know what? It makes sense. Shatner, Shaw. Shatner, Patrick Stewart, Sir Ian McKellen– the triumvirate!

There’s a gray area between good and bad throughout the movie. How does that gray area come to play with your characters, Kevin and Michael, to justify everything they do?

Fassbender: As an audience member and as an actor I much prefer to find ambiguity in that gray area. Nowadays, especially in big commercial films it’s much easier for the audience, and they tend to get spoonfed. It’s much more interesting to me, people leave the theater and they start asking themselves questions and find their own moral compass about what these characters have been doing. In terms of justification for what he does, I could see where the motivation was, and where the motivation came from. For me, Erik is a Machiavellian character– the end justifies the means. That really sums him up best in one line.

Bacon: I think it’s also important to remember– people ask what’s it like playing the villain, playing the bad guy. Most people, I don’t think that what I’m doing is bad. If I’m really in the skin of who I’m playing, I don’t think of myself as a bad guy, I don’t think of myself as a good guy. Obviousl, my perception of the world is one where humans are a threat to our survival. As Michael said, the ends can justify the means. The ways he goes awe about it, and the misguided nature of it, and the power-hungry egomaniacal aspect of it is there, but he’s not thinking, “I’m going to do something evil now.”

Fassbender: That was really evil! I just upped my evilness!

Who has the coolest mutant power?

McAvoy: Vomit acid? That’s pretty cool.

Fassbender: Caleb’s is pretty good, to represent him.

McAvoy: Caleb is like a rock star for humanity. We never really picked up on that did we.

Fassbender: Later to become a themed metal, spandex. Glam rock.

January, you were going to say something?

Jones: Yeah, I loved my character the best I think.

x-men-first-class-magneto-character-poster-01To each of you, what was your initial reaction when you found out you’d be in the film?

Rose Byrne: Oh, when I got the gig. I was nervous! It was so last minute, and it had all begun, but I was very excited to work with the cast.

Fassbender: Which member of the cast were you most excited to work with? If you had to choose..

Jones: I was a bit nervous, to be honest. It’s a big responsibility to take on a character that’s so beloved by the fans, and I wanted to do a good job. It happened very quickly for me as well, and I was just a bit nervous, physically how it would come to play that I, in a day, would look amazing. That didn’t really work out.

McAvoy: I was a little bit surprised. I didn’t see myself as the archetypal Sir Patrick Stewart, bald, Jean Luc Picard professor of the Starship Enterprise. That was quite difficult to get my head around. I read the script, or the first 40 pages that existed at the time, and I realized we could take the character in a whole different direction.Have a lot more fun with him, make him a little bit more silly, a little bit more drunk, a little bit more randy. And that was good fun.

Fassbender: I was intrigued.

Bacon: I don’t know if this says something about my self-esteem, but the first thing I thought when they said they’re offering you X-Men I was “Who fell out?”

Fassbender: It was Brian Dennehy.

McAvoy: I think it was Bryan Brown!

Kravitz: I was f#%@#&! excited.

Till: I guess in a few words, “Holy s$#!!” Awesome. That was actually my reaction.

For Rose, while you were filming, did you ever suffer from power envy? Or was it a blessing in disguise that you didn’t have to go through the powers and special effects.

x-men-first-class-professor-x-character-poster-01Byrne: At the time it was good, because I didn’t have to go to makeup. I would be like, “Oh, I had to come in at 6,” and Nicholas Hoult would be like, “I got here at 2 o’clock in the morning.” You win! I haven’t seen the film yet, but I’m sure I’ll have mutant envy.

McAvoy: Your character does have the mutant power of immaculate hair at all times.

For both January and Zoe, in addition to mutant powers, you both kind of use your sexuality as a weapon.

Kravitz: No we don’t.

Misread, misread on the screening. So I’d love to know if it was the direction, if you did research on the character, if it’s something that comes naturally.

Jones: My sexuality comes easily to me. I thought for the character it’s a huge part of Emma Frost’s character. Maybe unlike some of the younger characters that are developing or honing their powers, I’ve had time to perfect that, so I use that to my advantage. I think Emma’s vanity plays a huge part of her powers, just her makeup. The way she looks is very important to her.

Kravitz: I did research on the Wonderbra.

Can you talk about why you think this particular franchise is so successful at the box office? How much was that a factor when you signed on to the film?

Jones: I think it’s the fans.

Fassbender: Yeah. I think the whole concept of the X-Men is a mature idea. As opposed to superhero comics in general, there is a sort of alter ego that makes up for the geek inside. I think that idea of alienation is a universal thing. Whether it be for religious beliefs, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. I think everybody experiences it somewhat on a smaller school when you are going to secondary school and you want to be accepted. So I think it obviously touches on a nerve that people can relate to.

This question is for January Jones. Congratulations on all of your success on Mad Men and on the news that you are going to be a first time mom. How has this experience been going for you?

Jones: I feel great. I haven’t had any weird physical side effects or anything. I feel pretty lucky.

Have you experienced any interesting or fun food cravings?

Jones: Everyone asks that, but I haven’t yet. It’s a bummer. I wish I had something weird to tell you, but I don’t.

x-men-first-class-movie-image-january-jones-kevin-bacon-01Are you going to name your child after one of the X-Men?

Fassbender: Like Little Magneto or Magneto Jr. Little Xavier or Little Banshee.

McAvoy: or Riptide.

Fassbender: Riptide needs his nappy changed. [laughter]

McAvoy: Riptide just ripped a new one.

What kind of mom do you hope to be?

Jones: A good one.

It seems obvious from just being up here that you have a great rapport. Was that an instant connection or did you fall into that?

McAvoy: I fell into Michael on the first day. It just happened. We didn’t mean it. One thing lead to another.

Fassbender: Kevin and I exchanging helmets. We were rubbing helmets a lot and getting to know one another on a very intimate level.

McAvoy: That bond was broken and suddenly he is not calling me any more. He is doing Prometheus. Whatever, man. We shared something.

Bacon: Come over later and polish my helmet. [laughter]

X-Men-First-Class-movie-image-Michael-FassbenderMcAvoy: I’ll spit polish it. The answer to that question is that we did get on very well, which is good. One of the things about the X-Men movies is that there is always 5,000 characters that you have to get to in 2 hours. It can be a real task. I think Matthew did a good job of telling everybody’s story well. Part of that is that there is a rapport among everyone and that connection and that chemistry somehow translates on screen as well.

Fassbender: And the support I think. That was the one thing. Everybody sort of came. It was tough. We were under pressure and there wasn’t a lot of time to prepare things. WE kind of did have to dive into things immediately. I have to say that I was really impressed by the younger cast who were coming into something that is so high profile. They are starting off with maybe not that many films under their belt, but they have a real sort of openness and a lack of an attitude or a security that can lead to bad behavior or what ever else. There was a superb talent at the base of it, but there was a real openness. I have to say that I was very impressed by that.

This is for Michael. There is a lot of James Bond stuff going on in this movie. Would you be interested in taking over Daniel Craig after his tenure with Bond is over?

Fassbender: I don’t know. I don’t like to plan anything ever because it never seems to work. I’m just really…let’s just get this film out and see how this one does. I’m sort of in the middle of doing another one. You know, Dan is doing a great job We will see what happens. I’m very flattered that people made that leap, but I don’t know. We will see.

This film left me in a very different place than the other 3 X-Men films. As the credits were rolling I thought to myself, “Well, Magneto really has a point there.”

Fassbender: Yeah. I agree with you, man. His actions are one thing, but his philosophy stands true. Everything he says comes to fruition. This idea of the human race. As we all know, history teaches us that we are an incredibly destructive race and the fact that whenever a fear element comes into something that is unknown or different we tend to destroy it. So all of those discussions that Charles and Erik have, in the end, the human beings prove Erik right.

X-Men-First-Class-movie-image-James-McAvoy-Michael-FassbenderMcAvoy: I think the other things we realized in the other X-Men movies is that quite often the forces of humanity are lead by Machiavellian humans also. In this movie, I feel like the humans decide to take out all of the mutants because they are scared. It is a very human reaction, which makes them less of a bad guy, but it also makes you go, “Well, he is right because they aren’t even trying to be bad guys and they are still going to wipe us out.” They are just reacting. It makes it more real I think.

We’ve heard about the long extended shoot and how quickly everything came together. Sometimes when movies have these things happen, the final turn out is not a good film. This film is fantastic. Can you talk about your reactions after your first time seeing it?

McAvoy: I phoned Michael within half an hour to just go, “Dude, you just have to just see it quick because you are going to be relieved. You’re going to be able to go to the toilet again.” [laughter] We were worried because sometimes these things are a nightmare when you make it. It’s well documented that it was and there is no point in hiding it. It has turned out really good. We always thought that it could be really different and really brilliant or really bad and different. [laughter]

Does anyone else have any thoughts on the first time they saw it?

Bacon: I was completely knocked out. I really was. Many people that I contacted said to me, “You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard you react to one of your movies like that.” It was also super cool for me because there is so much that I am not in and that I wasn’t really seeing or being shot in that I didn’t know. I didn’t know the relationships between all of these guys and I didn’t see all of the sets that they were on. So a lot of this stuff I was seeing for the first time. Even though we had seen some of the mock ups of the effects, they are jaw dropping. They are so well done. Even scenes that we are in, we don’t know how exactly that is going to pan out. For instance, I had no idea what my own power was going to look like. It was really great. I was thrilled.

jennifer-lawrence-nicholas-hoult-x-men-first-class-imageThis question is for Zoë Kravitz. How is like working on a big film after working on smaller films?

Kravitz: It was fancier. Honestly, it wasn’t that different just because everyone was so cool. I feel like if I was here with a bunch of Hollywood assholes it would have been intimidating and an awful experience. If everyone is there to make a good film, everyone is down to earth, and everyone is there for the right reasons – the scale doesn’t really matter I think.

How popular are the X-Men comics in Europe and England where you guys grew up? Was it something that you knew as kids?

Fassbender: I didn’t. I certainly didn’t. Since getting the job and speaking with various people, they are everywhere. The waiter is like, “I’m a X-Men fan. You better not mess it up.” or whatever. That is what I was sort of saying earlier. I think the themes involved are so universal that they are X-Men and mutants everywhere and amongst us. That I found really surprising actually. To realize just how widespread that audience was.

McAvoy: I was aware of the cartoon. I don’t know if it was the same incarnation of the cartoon, but I was about 10-12 years old and my friend and I used to watch the cartoon all the time. So I was aware of that, but never of the comics. Comics weren’t really a big deal where I grew up.

Are you guys signed up to come back again now that people seem to love this movie?

Fassbender: They never want to pass up a chance to make money. So if we make money on this one, I’m sure we will be back next summer! [laughter]

Bacon: I’m signed up, but if you’ve seen the movie it doesn’t look good to me. [laughter]

michael-fassbender-x-men-first-class-movie-imageHave you guys had any fan interactions yet? Any fun stories or crazy encounters with fans?

Fassbender: I remember the one thing that I saw on a blog was that one of the fans said that the poster looked like a Sear’s catalog, which I thought was pretty funny. [laughter]

Bacon: I will tell you that the only thing I am maybe a little concerned about is that I don’t look anything like the comic book character. He is like a gigantic muscle bound guy with a pony tail and he dresses like George Washington. He has britches and all of this kind of stuff. When I saw it I thought, “Okay. I am kind of a weird choice to embody him.” Obviously, Matthew was going in a different direction. That being said, it was from the comic books. As Michael mentioned earlier, most of the research came…all of a sudden you realize people have been writing…one of the things that are great about comic books is that they really are into talking about backstory. I would learn all this stuff about him like where he grew up, his relationship to his father, his relationship to his wife who died and was killed. It was all of this kind of stuff. It was all extremely helpful to me in terms of creating the character. So I hope that I was true to the essence of him even though I don’t look like him.
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Re: X-men Cast Interviews with Michael

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