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X-Men Reviews 7

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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:31 am

http://www.cine-vue.com/2011/07/theatrical-releases-x-men-first-class.html

Theatrical Releases: 'X-Men: First Class'
‘Fanboys’ and girls alike awaited the release of X-Men: First Class (2011) with both baited breath and nervous apprehension, but as far as I’m concerned, this prequel doesn’t disappoint. Perhaps I found X-Men: First Class so entertaining because I have only a vague knowledge of the X-Men story and no solid basis for a comparison with the original Marvel comic but, as is always the case with this sort of film, the fewer expectations, the better.

Although origin stories can occasionally feel like they are merely box ticking, this particular film manages to effectively tell the tale of how the mutants discovered their abilities, how their relationships developed and how they ultimately came down on the side of good or evil.

Leads James McAvoy (Charles Xavier) and Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto) are excellently cast and both actors do a superb job of filling the incredibly large shoes of Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen, who play their older counterparts in the original franchise.

With films such as this it is often difficult to balance the fictitious nature of the genre with a plot and characters that remain relatable and realistic, particularly to the older viewer. And whilst at times X-Men: First Class feels as though it's verging on the side of a juvenile, 'kiddy’s blockbuster', it manages to avoid, albeit narrowly, going too far into the realms of absurdity. Arguably, what makes these moments easy to forgive is the film’s sense of humour.


X-Men: First Class' reluctance to take itself too seriously was, for me, what ensured that the film appealed to a wide audience. The banter between the young and charismatic Charles and Erik is particularly good, as they reveled in using their new found abilities to round up other mutants and shamelessly flirt with women. The comic highlight has to be Hugh Jackman’s cameo, in which the 12A rated film aptly uses its one permissible ‘F’ word.

I also appreciated the potentially controversial parallel drawn between being a misunderstood mutant and a discriminated racial minority and, though the comparison was perhaps a little heavy handedly conveyed, there is no place for subtlety in X-Men: First Class. The scenes of World War II brutality also provide an uneasy and unexpected opening to the film.

Although X-Men: First Class is not the best film of its kind, it certainly does its genre justice. If you’re an original X-Men fan suffering an internal dilemma about whether it will be engaging or merely disappointing, I’d recommend giving it a watch; you might just find that you are pleasantly surprised.

Maxine Bodicoat
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 1:33 am

http://www.list.co.uk/article/35326-x-men-first-class/

X-Men: First Class (4 stars)

Source: The List (Issue 682)
Date: 30 June 2011
Written by: Miles Fielder

(0)
X-Men: First Class
Latest in franchise makes clever use of Cold War-era setting

(12A) 132min

The novelty of the Hollywood franchise reboot has worn thin, but this re-launch of the initially excellent adaptations of the Marvel comic book benefits from a canny central concept that takes the mutant superhero team back to their beginnings. Rewinding to the early 1960s, the era in which the Stan Lee/Jack Kirby comic book first appeared, First Class tells the origin stories of Professor Xavier and Magneto (now played by James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender) and how they and their super-powered homo-superior brethren made their debut on the world stage. By X-Men: Last Stand, the thrice-told story of the human oppression of mutants, and the split in the latter’s ranks between pacifists and aggressors, was suffering from the law of diminishing returns. Relocating the story in the 1960s, however, re-emphasises what is, essentially, an allegory about race relations with Xavier and Magneto representing Martin Luther King and Malcolm X.

The sixties setting also allows the film’s co-writers Ashley Miller and Zack Stentz (who also penned Thor) and director Matthew Vaughn to give the proceedings a cool retro make-over. Thus, James Bond and Mad Men are the inspiration for the action, style and design of First Class, right down to period-appropriate - but wholly ironic - sexist attitudes towards women. Meanwhile, rebooting the franchise has allowed the filmmakers to further plunder the rich mythology of the 48-year run of the comic. Alongside Xavier and Magneto, we’re treated to early versions of shape-shifter Mystique and animal scientist Beast (Jennifer Lawrence and Nicholas Hoult), and there’s a priceless uncredited cameo from a fan favourite, but otherwise the cast of characters is all new. That’s a good thing in terms of the villains, who are lead by charismatic mastermind Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) and includes bikini-clad mind-reader Emma Frost (January Jones in a nicely knowing piece of casting), though less interesting in terms of the less memorable debuting young mutants.

The film’s new spin on the old plot makes clever use of its Cold War-era historical setting, so that Shaw’s bid to rid mutants of their human nemesis revolves around starting a nuclear war between America and Russia. In keeping with that, the film’s climactic set-piece takes place off the coast of Cuba at the height of the Missile Crisis. The action sequences are well-staged throughout, while the performances by the leads are particularly good, and the humour in general is pitched just right. It’s good enough to make you want more. Perhaps a second prequel will shift from the groovy sixties to the funky seventies?

Out now on general release. Thanks to Omni Vue Cinema, Edinburgh.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:27 pm

http://casuallyfanatic.wordpress.com/2011/07/05/x-men-first-class/

X-Men: First Class

Let’s chat about X-Men: First Class!

Expectations: People said it was better than Origins: Wolverine and Last Stand, so I figured I’d give it a shot.

Boy, did this movie pleasantly surprise me. X-Men has long been one of the most stern and earnest franchises in all mediums, and while this has always served it well, when put in the hands of clumsy film directors at the whim of petty box office goals determined by statistical demographic analysis rather than a mutual respect with the audience, has been an overwhelming failure. This film, however, was a joyful romp, completely uncharacteristic of an X-Men story. Even at its most somber and sobering moments, I still felt the film was having fun with us. It didn’t take itself seriously in the slightest, which allowed for exaggerated performances, corny one liners, and playful training montages to feel totally at home rather than eye rollingly out of place. More importantly, despite always remaining tonally tongue and cheek, the film did still have a decently focused and interesting story that in some ways were quite uncharacteristic of the superhero genre. While on the surface it may have seemed to be just another superhero movie, many of the elements at play surprised and delighted me.

Where to begin! Well, first off just covering the ancillary elements, the film maintained the industry standard of visual effects without any positive or negative surprises, the editing was solid if conventional, and the score did the job. The casting, though, was fantastic. James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender and Jennifer Lawrence did a good job following through on the depth their characters were offered, Kevin Bacon was an ideal over the top cheesy supervillain, and the supporting cast always felt right for the tone of the film (even January Jones, who was atrocious, but appropriate for her character). Overall, Michael Vaughn did a fantastic job balancing the film between its over the top hero cliche side and its more sincere story side.

I appreciated the strong connection the film kept with the prior films (specifically the first two, the Bryan Singer films, which is understandable given his involvement in the project). This was in no way a reboot of the X-Men franchise, but a proper prequel (which is rarely, if ever, accomplished well). It established and maintained the shared universe, both in look and in feel, but was not a slave to it, still freely telling its own story. The opening scene with Eric, used footage from the first X-Men film, but then continued the scene, making it clear from the start what story we are being told this time around. The rest of the tie ins and references (brief cameos by Rebecca Romijn and Hugh Jackman, the appearance of the “Magneto helmet”) felt like playful surprises rather than obligatory acknowledgements. None of these references felt forced or desperate because there weren’t to many of them and because the story was never sacrificed. This film did what a good prequel should do, give us fresh insight into the world of the franchise by exploring that world and its characters in ways that we haven’t seen before. The world of this film is one in which mutants are new to the world and to each other. None of the characters have really figured out yet how to live in this world, how to reconcile how they feel with what they think is right. This gives a depth to the story that is very unlike most superhero stories, and certainly different from the traditional world of X-Men, in which all of our heroes already know how to live in the world as mutants, and their struggle is to uphold the ideals they already have; an external struggle rather than an internal one (not to say that there are no internal struggles in other X-Men stories, but the older Professor X and Magneto are always clear bastions of their respective ideals from minute one, unlike in this film, where their characters are still discovering their place in the world).

The story of X-Men: First Class has two interweaving sides that converge at the end of the film; Eric’s desire for revenge against Sebastian, and Raven’s desire to be accepted by the world. Both plots are brilliantly driven heavily by Xavier’s character; who is a unique primary protagonist in that he never wavers in his desire to achieve peace and understanding between mutants and humans (like his older self), and yet is deeply flawed in his arrogance and idealism (unlike his older self). The tension in both Eric and Raven’s stories come directly from him. This incarnation of Charles Xavier is completely arrogant, cocky, and insensitive; a far cry from the enlightened serenity of the older version of him that we are so accustomed to (using his powers to pick up women would certainly be considered a misuse by his older self). He takes it for granted that Raven will follow him forever, and doesn’t see how much he pushes her away with his lack of understanding. There is a rich and biting irony that our primary protagonist can read minds, and yet he doesn’t understand the one person closest to him. Xavier makes up for this by remaining steadfast and idealistic. He never questions his desire to do what is right, but he’s too young to know the best way to go about it. This is a fantastic contrast with Eric’s character, who is just as flawed in completely different ways. Eric has a righteous anger that he hasn’t mastered yet (opposing the older and calmer nature of his older self). We relate to him immediately because he is tragically victimized from the beginning of the film. It is from his perspective that we yearn for victory over Sebastian, and there is a powerful tension between his personal quest for vengeance, and Xavier’s idealistic quest for unity and justice. We know that these two paths will lead in the same direction for only so long, and the tension builds to the end of the film when they split apart violently. Shaw’s villainy is classic over the top popcorn supervillainy, but it serves its purpose of driving the inevitable split between Charles and Eric efficiently, all the while remaining fun and cliche in the spirit of the film.

There are certainly flaws and eye rolling moments in the film; for example, it is absurd that Shaw’s minions are so willing to drop everything and join Magneto at the end, stuff like that. However, since the film has the tone of a tongue in cheek, over the top, cheesy cliche superhero film, these kinds of moves, while stupid, can be accepted. Ultimately the film succeeds because of its powerful and well balanced story, that keeps us on our toes, rooting for our heroes, while keeping us constantly questioning them. I can definitely say that this is one of the finest super hero films yet made.

A

This entry was posted on July 5, 2011 at 12:37 pm
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:28 pm

http://paleyfilms.net/2011/07/05/review-61-x-men-first-class/

Review #61- X-Men: First Class

X-Men: First Class

X-Men: First Class is the fifth entry in the X-Men film series. Grabbing the reins from the franchise’s previous directors (Bryan Singer, Brett Ratner, and Gavin Hood), Matthew Vaughn creates his own take on our familiar mutant superheroes, focusing specifically on the group’s origin story. This prequel tracks the relationship between a young Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender), and their moral dichotomy. Both want mutants to stop being persecuted; however, they disagree on how to accomplish it.

It is the Cold War, and Xavier and Lehnsherr begin rounding up a team of mutants to save the world from the evil Hellfire Club, led by Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon). The two partners become teachers, and train the “first class” of X-Men, helping the students learn to control their powers and use them for the greater good. The mutants (both good and bad) are played by a huge ensemble cast, including the likes of Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, January Jones, and Jason Flemyng, among others.

Though McAvoy is quite excellent here, Fassbender gives the film’s best performance, as the “soon to be Magneto” Lehnsherr, a Holocaust survivor. Lehnsherr’s spiteful behavior can be seen as the result of scars from his childhood. After being examined by Nazis, who have discovered his magnetic abilities, his mother is brutally murdered and guilt is unfairly showered upon the child. While Xavier is earnest and peaceful, Lehnsherr is more aggressive and upset at society.

Because the main characters are so strong, it is a real shame that the screenplay is as poor as it is. Ridiculous, cliche dialogue is all this film has to offer, and truly suffers as a result. The movie has so many eye rolling lines (e.g. “Mutant and proud”) it often becomes unintentionally funny. On more than one occasion, people are asked to choose where their loyalties lie, and come to decisions laughably fast. Furthermore, there are far too many side characters over-stuffing the film: they are a dime a dozen, and tend to be fairly unmemorable. The mutant training scenes are quite fun to watch, but become silly when characters start giving each other superhero names, clearly in reference to what the viewer already knows from the franchise’s previous entries. As a saving grace, the recruiting sequence itself manages to be witty and clever, and features one of the funniest cameos I’ve seen in recent history.

In addition to Fassbender and McAvoy, what saves the film is the direction and action. For starters, the fight scenes are very tight and have good special effects. Instead of being a series of muddled edits, like so many superhero movies unfortunately do, scenes play out maturely and understandably, due mainly to Vaughn’s direction. Even a weak script suffers less in the hands of good filmmakers and actors, wielding visceral thrills to counter the literary faults.

While certainly not as good as Bryan Singer’s pair of X-Men films, X-Men: First Class is a vast improvement over X-Men Origins: Wolverine. It may stylistically be the most unique entry of the series, but with a better screenplay could have been the best film in the series. This is a mix of quality and wasted potential on a pretty non-offensive level.

3 Stars

This entry was posted on 5. July 2011 at 23:14
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:37 pm

http://meenscene.wordpress.com/2011/07/05/what-to-go-see-in-the-cinema/

What to go see in the Cinema

{ July 5, 2011 @ 6:50 pm } · { Film }
{ Tags: What to go see in the Cinema }

I have finally had a chance to go to the cinema recently after a busy week of job hunting (impossible in the current economy). Here is my verdict on what I saw

X-Men First Class : The best of what is currently at the cinema. Starring James McAvoy as a young Professor X and Michael Fassbender as the ying to his yang (Magneto). The film is a good mix of action and tasty prequel plot which manages to solidly keep your attention for a good 2 hours.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:37 pm

http://shamereview.blogspot.com/2011/07/film-review-roundup-may-june.html

X-Men: First Class

(Directed by Matthew Vaughn, running time 132 minutes)

Michael Fassbender finally has the (star)power in X-Men: First Class.

Following the abysmal X-Men Origins: Wolverine, the X-Men film franchise appeared close to the brink. Director Matthew Vaughn of Kick-Ass fame saves it from going under with what feels more like a reboot than a prequel. With a fresh young cast, First Class goes to the young adult years of Charles Xavier (Professor X) and Erik Lensherr (Magneto) played by James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender respectfully, both being interesting, complex and wholly likable portrayals of the classic Marvel characters. While the side characters may not share the same level of character development, they all do their parts justice with a more three-dimensional Mystique played by Jennifer Lawrence and an effective villian of Sebastian Shaw played by the reliable Kevin Bacon as he attempts to kick start World War Three. With a fresh story-arc and more real drama, First Class is a truly well crafted superhero adventure.

Also staring Rose Bryne, Nicolas Hoult and Oliver Platt.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:39 pm

http://baxojayz.blogspot.com/2011/07/review-tuesday-x-men-first-class.html

Tuesday, July 05, 2011
Review Tuesday: X-Men: First Class

X-Men: First ClassI used to collect and read comic books years ago. While I wasn't a huge fan of The X-Men, I had deep respect for the book and characters especially since a fellow BPMS member and friend, Dave Cockrum (the man who drew the caricature of your humble narrator) invented several of the original team. This movie is called "First Class" but does not have that exact line-up.

This movie is set, mostly in the early 1960s, but it does have scenes explaining the origins of the original leaders of the mutants, Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender), how they meet, how they collected the first groups of mutants with super powers, and how they impacted the world.

I found the movie fun and entertaining. It wasn't burdened down with too much detail. The leaders were given their proper time on screen. The peripheral characters, not so much. The evil villain, Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) did his job well. The story was fluid and moved along well. The worst part of the movie was also some of teh best parts on screen, The White Queen aka Emma Frost (January Jones) was wooden on screen. She was like the hottest mannequin you've ever seen, but sucked the life out of every scene she was in. But, damn, they dressed her up nice!

As long as you aren't a big fan of X-men and know the proper sequences and are a stickler for those sorts of details, you should be okay with this movie. Yes, it's an absurd movie, but it's a SUPERHERO movie, so it should be absurd. Once you get past that hurtle, you should be fine.

It's probably out of theaters already. I bet they will have an extended version of the movie on DVD. It'll be worth it to pick up.

More on IMDB:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1270798/
at 2:15 PM
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:18 pm

http://themovieblog.com/2011/07/x-men-second-class

‘X-Men’ Second Class…

Posted by Darrenon 05. 07. 2011in News Chat

Don’t look surprised. It’s not like the earth just shook and got you off guard. Despite Fox having a mild disappointment with ‘X-Men : First Class’, it’s been decided to have a sequel, which is a prequel to…oh, you know. In any case…the nice folks over at Screenrant have this “news” for us to enjoy:

According to The Geek Files, Fox is “discussing sequels internally” which they undoubtedly have been since opening weekend.

Both Singer and Vaughn have plenty of ideas for X-Men: First Class 2 which would likely keep the series set in the ’60s, but based a few years later, again tied into real historical events. When you think about it, they could go on with many more films before needing to introduce some of the characters we met in Bryan Singer’s first X-Men film (Cyclops, Jean Grey and Storm, etc.).

First Class was a good film and helped keep the franchise alive. It is also the best “hero” film of the summer thus far, and even though people would much rather see a follow up to The Last Stand and a revelation that Cyclops is still alive and kicking, a lot of folks (including myself) would love to see more Michael Fassbender as a younger Magneto. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

In any case, I just got two words for FOX and the producers of The First Class II (or as I call it, ‘The Second Class’)

Mister.
Sinister.

‘Nuff said.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:18 pm

http://themoviebros.com/2011/07/05/x-men-first-class/

X-Men: First Class
Posted on July 5, 2011 by The Movie Brothers| 3 Comments

In this exciting prequel to the X-Men series, Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) — the future Professor X and Magneto — are best friends dedicated to harnessing their powers and promoting the education of fellow mutants during the turbulent 1960s. The duo works together to stop a powerful adversary that threatens mankind, but their ideological differences drive them apart and turn them into ferocious enemies.

Rating: 8 out of 10

It’s amazing how popular and influential the Wolverine character can be. That characters’ inclusion in the original X-Men series caused a lot of the others to be largely ignored. Professor X, Magneto, Cyclops, Iceman, and many others were barely glazed over, much less explored in any satisfying way. In fact, Wolverine was such a popular character that Fox gave the green light to a $150 million budget for his own film and origin story. So, with “X-men First Class,” and no Wolverine to be found (except for maybe the quick funny cameo), how would an X-men film fare?

Well, it turns out to be the best in the entire series. A lot of the credit for that goes to director Matthew Vaughn ( Kick-Ass, Stardust) who makes sure action never comes at the expense of plot and character development. Each of the primary characters in the X-Men First Class are perfectly cast and fleshed out in a way that makes us care what happens to them. I remember when I watched the first 3 flicks in the series that I thought they were all well-made films but none ever engaged me enough to truly care what happened to any of them. The effects were great, the action was great, and the plots were decent. However, many other comic book films made since have caused me to ignore them. The first two Spiderman films, “Batman Begins,” “Dark Knight,” and the Hellboy films are all better. I suppose the difficulty with the X-Men series is that it never truly lended itself to a two hour movie format. There’s just too much back story, too many characters, and too big a world to explore that it’s impossible to explain it all, especially to the non-comic book readers. That’s where “X-Men: First Class” gets it just right. It takes a step back and allows us to slowly get initiated into the world and character relationships to the point where all the other films will make a lot more sense. Is it on par with the greatest comic book films? No, but it’s a lot of fun and works even for those that have never opened a comic book.
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:20 pm

http://sinnerinrepentance.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class.html

Tuesday, 5 July 2011
X-Men First Class
Assalaamu'alaikum wa Rahmatullah!

Peace be upon everyone! Just returned from theater cause I watched the X-Men First Class with lil sister. It's always nice to watch the movie early in the morning. No long ques, no sweat, no exhaustive waiting while looking at people's upset face because waiting for long only for a movie which could be seen in TV or DVD after the screening.

Well, if it's about X-Men then it's about mutants from the Marvel comics. A main character in the movie is portrayed as a poor mutant Jew boy from Dusseldorf who was tortured by a Nazi doctor whose name is Schmidt something in order to get the boy to show off his power. The Jew boy later grown up as Erik (Michael Fassbender) who takes the name Magneto. Another main character is Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) from Britain, a mutant genetic professor candidate in Oxford and he is also a mutant, with telepathic ability. Charles Xavier became Professor X.

The movie revolves around a mutant Nazi medical staff who survives the Second World War because he is different from normal human-kind. he is known as Dr. Schmidt Klaus and he wanted to gain power to rule over the world by making the US and the USSR both fighting among each other and releasing their nuke. So, he would get to absorb the power released by the nuclear bombs and being the ruler of the world. I am not a conspiracy theory fan so I don't really think that every symbols in the movie could be interpreted although I can do that because a character in the movie is a Jew.

I don't believe in any Jewry superiority over other human-being nor eating up those made up craps by paranoid racist Caucasians that these people are powerful than the God. I keep with me Old Testaments and New Testaments that I bought myself when I was a form 6 student. I have acquaintances in both Israel and Palestine territory and at certain stage I talk with them through messengers or live if they are Palestinian friends. Jews are just human being descended from the sons of Adam. They are erroneous just like other human no matter what race we are. The setting took place in 1962 during Cuban Missile Crisis, the origin of the mutant groups, and the relationship between both Magneto and Professor X.

I remember where I had talked about Nazism and Jews with my German teacher and friend whose name is Frau Myer because after Friday prayer I had a meeting with her regarding my problem with German which is a barbaric tongue for me, hahaha. I am not going to continue my German class next semester although I must finish it up to the second level to fulfill my certification requirement. It's a torture to my tongue and throat, lol. Just kidding, I had missed her classes many times due to some problems regarding my research and I couldn't show up my face to her anymore because I feel embarrassed of myself.

I am sorry if my thought is slightly different from other fellow Muslims regarding the people of the books. I talked about Nazism, Hitler, Jews in Europe and Frau Myer frowned her face. She then said: "Why people always and must be talking about this evil thing that happened in the past? Hitler wasn't a German to begin with. He is an Austrian and yes, he speaks in German just like us in Germany but with southern dialect. He was just unhappy with his unfortunate life where the Jews are bunch of business people while Caucasians were lazy. When he went to apply for job, for sure those Jews do not tolerate him as they had stigmas on these people." This is somehow like what happens in our country and everywhere no?

What is the difference on this situation of the Jews in Continental Europe with South Asian Muslims in British Isle? British are also generalized by people like Malaysian ourselves as lazy people where jobless youths receive incentives from their welfare tax system. Immigrants from other part of the world went there in Britain and settling there later have to pay high tax to help those jobless British youngsters. I had read crime news about some Muslim Bangladeshis beaten up a religious education teacher in southern London. If we do not agree with someone, do we have to show violence? Unless if the situation is threatening us, then it would be fine to defend ourselves. Britain has so many private religious schools and even Muslim associations. Why do we have to be so jumud (narrow)?

She further said" "Whatever happened in the past does not reflect our agreement with those people. We are not them although we are Germans. When some Malay kids here looking at me and they know that I am a German, they would show the Nazi sign to me. I would say that I hate that sign and consider it as an insult to me." She is not a Jew but a native German, a Caucasian. And she is married to a Muslim from Penang. She is a Muslim and a muallaf could we say so although she had been a Muslim for more than 16 years? I talked to her about what I had listened in our Friday congregational prayer regarding Valentine day and I just can't understand why do these people have to talk like Jews or Israelites or Christians no matter where they are or what they are like they are some beasts or fallen angels? These people are just normal human and not angels. They are not special as all of the human-being are the same without any special power like what had been proposed in conspiracy theory or in American fantasy movies. A theory is just a framework and it could be wrong or right according to situation and period of time. It is not necessarily a dogma or a faith. This is what we learned in epistemology. If we want everyone to step into His salvation, enmity is not the way but amity and understanding is needed.

I read Israelite prophet stories like Goliath and Talut. I read about prophet of the children of Israel like David peace be upon him who defeated Goliath after Talut had forgotten his responsibility toward the path because of jealousy. This is not from Israeliyat source but from our Quranic tradition itself, surah al-Baqarah verse 246-252. We also know about Israeliyat sources by Ka'ab bin Munabbeh and other exegesis.

I don't think anything negative about these non-Muslims because I was once a disbeliever too who hate Muslims including myself though being born in a Muslim family. Faith is not an inheritance, it is through His guidance, revelation and His Will that we receive the faith. I only believe in whatever is right and wrong. Whatever is commanded by the Lord on every creatures. I don't believe in a paranoid conspiracy and it is a waste of time. When I look at the Jews or Christians, I am actually looking at them as a mirror to myself.

Whatever wrong that those nations in the past had came through could also happen to us. We aren't special and so do they. When we claim that we are special nations, then we are no different to our accusations to those Jews. The God reminds us about that in glorious Quran, but not for us to hate them like they are some kind of satans or beasts. I just can't understand when the Lord says that Muhammad s.a.w is the sign of His Mercy in the Universe but many of us had turn it up to be the sign of His hatred toward other nations.

We came out with the pride of Arabs, the Levantines, the Canaa'nites and whatever ideology founded on the basis of evil over the other who we would say thinking that they could tie "the hand" of the God. I had also experienced racist treatment from northern Arab brothers who think that they are Caucasians while I was in pilgrimage just like what had happened to Imam Hu Songshan although I don't look Chinese. Might be looking a little bit Mongol or Central Asian, haha. I could just generalize others and reforming my mind with worldly political ideology, but I am not that kind of person.

Furthermore, the sin is on individual and it's not inherited or could be hanged on other person. Everyone is responsible for his sin and it is narrow. Whatever happens around us, is because of our own faults. We may choose to avoid minor destruction although the greater one is unavoidable because it is His Will. To avoid minor destruction is through our heart being purified from evil. Not only on our physical appearance. We have so many negativity about this world, I am not excluded from that. I hate this world too, and each time I would pray to God to take me home or please quickly destruct this Universe.

This movie somehow reflects myself. Some of the mutant like the Raven girl who can shift her appearance to other appearances trying to fit in into society because she is embarrassed of her look. I think that I am just like her. This happened due to long psychological process when mingling with people around and that makes us negative toward our selves. And how past experience also forming one self to be the self of this present like what happened to Erik.

Sealed with prayers for peace, mercy and love for brothers and sisters in faith, amin!
Posted by sinner in repentance at 03:27
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:31 pm

http://www.cinemasight.com/2011/07/04/reviews-x-men-first-class-2011/

X-Men: First Class (2011)

X-Men: First Class

Rating

Director
Matthew Vaughn
Screenplay
Ashley Miller, Zack Stentz, Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn, Sheldon Turner, Bryan Singer
Length
132 min.
Starring
James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Kevin Bacon, Rose Byrne, Jennifer Lawrence, Oliver Platt, Alex Gonzalez, Jason Flemyng, Zoe Kravitz, January Jones, Nicholas Hoult, Caleb Landry Jones, Edi Gathetgi, Lucas Till
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Buy on DVD
Buy on Blu-ray

Soundtrack
Poster

Review
When the celeb-laden first X-Men film came out just over a decade ago, audiences were taken aback at how refreshing a superhero film could be when the story was spread across multiple heroes. After three sequels, one of which was a character-centric film about Wolverine, the series needed a fresh start and with First Class, our appreciation for multi-character storytelling is renewed.

The film opens with a re-worked scene from X-Men 2: X-Men United where a young Erik Lensherr is forcibly separated from his parents as they are taken to various concentration camps around Germany during World War II. A mangled iron gate leads a cruel Nazi doctor (Kevin Bacon) to pull Erik into his study where he experimented in an effort to figure out how his mutation worked.

Nearly twenty years later, a group of mutants calling themselves the Hellfire Club have gathered as the United States and Russia are on the brink of nuclear war. Set just before and during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, the Hellfire Club, run by energy-absorbing mutant Sebastian Shaw (Bacon), plans to enhance the tensions and start a new world war in an effort to exert their dominance over homo sapiens. He's supported by January Jones (Mad Men) as Emma Frost, a telepath who can turn herself into living diamond; Alex Gonzalez as Riptide, a wind and tornado controller; and Jason Flemyng (Primeval) as Azazel, a red-skinned devil-faced mutant able to teleport.

After the CIA discovers the Hellfire Club, Agent Moira MacTaggert (Rose Byrne) gets permission to seek advise from mutation expert Charles Xavier (James McAvoy), himself a powerful telepath (a fact he does not reveal to Moira and the CIA until later). Xavier brings with him Raven (Jennifer Lawrence), a naturally-blue-skinned shapeshifter who can impersonate anyone. In their first nautical encounter with the Hellfire Club, they meet up with Erik (Michael Fassbender) who has been seeking revenge against the Nazi doctor for nearly twenty years. Teaming up, the CIA sets up a base of operations where Xavier can help locate and recruit several young mutants. With the help of Dr. Hank McCoy's (Nicholas Hoult) "Cerebro" machine, which augments Xavier's abilities, they find several mutants. They enlist the aide of Angel Salvadore (Zoe Kravitz), a dragonfly-winnged acid-spitter; Sean Cassidy (Caleb Landry Jones), a sonic-voiced kid; Armando Munoz (Edi Gathegi), an environment-adaptive chameleon; and Alex Summers (Lucas Till), who can release a beam of pure red energy from his chest. Inexperienced, Xavier begins training all of them, including Erik, to control their powers and harness them for good.

It may seem like a lot to take in, but director Matthew Vaughn takes his time exploring each character. While Erik has the lion's share of dramatic thrust, Xavier, Raven and Hank each get suitable development. It's one of the reason the X-Men series has succeeded so well. Unlike Marvel's other properties leading up to the new Avengers film, X-Men does not require separate, individual films to explore the various machinations, goals and desires of its players. Developing each as the film moves along allows the audience to fully immerse itself in one of the most varied and accessible comic franchises in film history. These youngsters aren't your average popular kids. They are the misfits who are bullied and abused for being different. They struggle to fit in and go to extreme lengths to do so. The series shows young audiences (and even adult ones) what it means to accept each others' differences.

Having the franchise's first director (he crafted the first two and best films prior to First Class) Bryan Singer as a producer and story co-writer likely helped the effort, enabling a smooth continuity between films. While many of the comic's elements were altered to make the film more marketable at the outset, there is no doubt that the creative team behind the film is committed to moving forward with its well established and exciting world.

Moving the series into the era of 50 years ago was a dangerous move. Many of today's biggest blockbusters are set in the year in which they are released enabling audiences to more closely identify with the characters and situations. Yet, keeping with continuity it was impossible not to go back that far and it was a wise decision regardless of potential the ramifications. The sets and costumes are superb and without feeling antiquated, the film gives us the relevant events like a good history lesson while manipulating them into the plot in a compelling way.

The film's performances are also top-notch, bringing in a number of talented young thespians. Bacon is obviously the most experienced in the cast and he does not disappoint. While some of his actions and dialogue are a bit outlandish, there's a spark of humanity that gives him the depth great villains require. McAvoy and Fassbender have the most difficult tasks, creating younger versions of established characters Professor X (Patrick Stewart) and Magneto (Ian McKellen). Trying to fill the shoes of two brilliant actors was difficult, but both did well. Fassbender nails the meatiest scenes and delivers a nuanced performance that even McKellen would be proud of.

Of the younger stars, Lawrence is obviously the standout. Hot off her Oscar-nominated turn in Winter's Bone, Lawrence makes the most of Raven, giving her several layers of depth. This performance, even in a Summer tentpole film, tells us that she's not just a one-hit wonder. Hoult, who starred in the Oscar-nominated picture About a Boy opposite Hugh Grant and then rose to prominence on the British series Skins, gives a sustainable performance, though there are times when I don't buy that he's really been put upon as a young mutant.

The visual effects aren't the sparkly, look-at-me effects we see frequently in films destined for high box office performance. Instead, we get more subtle, realistic effects. It may not be that original these days to see a massive submarine lifted out of the ocean or many of the other effects presented in the film, but the visual effects artists still manage to impress with their attention to detail and capability to blend them effortlessly with the rest of the film.

You aren't likely to find a better franchise film this summer and, I'd be hard-pressed not to cite this as the best film in the X-Men series, barely surmounting the exceptional X2: X-Men United eight years ago. Matter of fact, I would even suggest that this is the best superhero film to date. While I admire The Dark Knight a great deal, it is a hard decision for me to place X-Men: First Class above it, which I do. First Class simply has more enduring emotional resonance than The Dark Knight, which gives it the slight edge.
Review Written
June 30, 2011
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:32 pm

http://scriptinhand.blogspot.com/2011/07/first-class-first-class.html

Monday, July 4, 2011
First Class, "First Class!"
X-Men: First Class
A review, done in bullet-points

I'll confess - I'm not a huge fan of the X-Men comic book properties. My first real exposure to the mutants was with the first Bryan Singer film, and I moved outward from there, picking up the classic 90s animated series and some trade paperbacks which collected some of the major storylines. I was also a fan of the uncanny series written for a time by Joss Whedon, and I saw the rest of the films in the theatre. So I'm not as fully versed in the X-canon as I am with the Super-canon, so these comments will reflect that quote-unquote bias. I'm also not going to attempt to post a comprehensive review of the film. That territory has already been well-covered by Superhero Hype, The Guardian, The Hollywood Reporter, Pajiba.com, and the New York Times, and I don't really have the time to say all of their comments again. So instead I will focus my thoughts in convenient bullet point format and run quickly through some of my major thoughts on this film.


What I loved:

The design and style. It was like a 1960s James Bond movie done with a budget and scale to rival modern blockbusters. It was a period piece, and they even replicated some of the filmmaking styles of the 60s. A training montage halfway through the film is amazing.
Professor X and Magneto. James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender steal the show. They are great together, and they steal the scenes they are in. Fassbender has a little more to do and a much broader arc, but both of them knock it out of the park.
Flight effects. As a Superman-fan, I am a sharp critic of flying on film. I never think it looks realistic. But the scenes of Banshee flying in this movie are some of the best that have ever been done. Very realistic, yet without obvious use of computer generated imagery.
The scope, but without the "origin-sickness." This one will take a second to explain. In many superhero franchises, the first film suffers from "origin sickness," taking a lot of time to develop and explain the backstory of the hero, showing the process by which the hero develops. But that often means that the first hour of the movie is dedicated to slow-moving development before the more interesting part begins. And First Class avoids that problem really well. I don't know if it's the genius of the screenwriting or the fact that the script banks on knowledge of previous X-films, but it works really well.

What I didn't love as much:

Emma Frost, and to some extent, Mystique. This film continues the tradition of the X-men film franchise of having excellent leading men and adequate leading women. Much has already been written about January Jones, but even Jennifer Lawrence's Mystique isn't compelling. Maybe it's because the majority of her scenes
Comic book tropes. The characters at one point come up with their own code names. Without missing a beat, they automatically pick the ones established by the comic books, including esoteric names like "Professor X." Where did that name come from, other than the fact that the comic books said so? When Hugh Jackman called him "Wheels" in the first movie, that felt authentic. These "code names" just felt forced.
Cameos. Well, one cameo in particular that was set in a bar, featuring a certain mutant that we all know from the previous films. He was played by the same actor as the original films, and I know I am in the minority that this cameo actually took me out of the movie. It was distracting to see the original actor in the new franchise films. It would be like having Leonard Nimoy is a Star Trek movie featuring a brand-new crew. Oh wait...
Confusion over the next step. Is this film a stand-alone prequel, or is it the first step in another trilogy to link up with the original film? If it was the first, then things weren't complex enough for me to jump over the 35-year-gap to get to the next film. Aside from the main characters aging, it seems like it should happen tomorrow. But if we're being set up for a sequel, then things were wrapped up a little too neatly

Overall:

This is one of the best superhero films I've ever seen. Despite having some problems here and there with continuity, it makes me want to see another one. Now I'm just hoping that Captain America is that good.

Posted by Nick at 12:15 PM
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Post by Admin on Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:36 pm

http://atowncalledpanicatthedisco.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class.html

Monday, July 4, 2011
X-Men: First Class


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I don’t like this poster because it’s missing Banshee and Riptide


I wanted to write this as a sort of movie review but I didn’t really know how to start it so it’s just going to be what I liked and didn’t like about the movie. I’m pretty sure my dislikes list will end up being bigger than my likes (they almost always are) but that’s because it’s easier to point out the negatives. No Spoilers

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Things I didn’t like

- I don’t think there was enough character development, I wanted to get to know a bit more about the mutants

- Certain things were too rushed and seemed to sum up too well at the ending

- There wasn’t enough screen time for Charles Xavier, yes I know he was in it quite a bit but the whole film seemed to focus more on Erik/Magneto. I personally find Xavier's character more interesting

- I still have questions about certain things that happened, I don’t understand how it happened or why they didn’t do certain things

- This isn’t necessarily something I didn’t like, more something I found strange. I don’t know if it was just me but Magento’s accent seemed to change into an Irish accent at the end of the film.

- I don’t think I liked Jennifer Lawrence as Raven/Mystique

- The romantic pairing were completely off and seemed to come out of nowhere

- My ship didn’t work out when they clearly had the most chemistry

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Things I liked

- The general plot of the film

- Charles Xavier’s personality

- The “Between rage and serenity” scene but this scene totally should have ended with a kiss

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- James McAvoy

- Michael Fassbender

- Nicholas Haoult in glasses

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- The scenes when Charles and Erik are recruiting

--The training scenes

- Hugh Jackman and Rebecca Romijn cameos

- Michael Fassbender’s pants

- All the Charles/Erik scenes

- Michael Fassbender in a wetsuit

- The sad scene at the end (So damn close to crying but I controlled myself)

- Everything else in the movie

Yes there were a few flaws but overall I think it was a great movie. I was reading imdb boards about it and people keep saying to consider this as a reboot instead of a prequel and that it’s been changed from the comics. I’ve been reading a bit about the comic book characters and it’s really interesting, the films have changed the characters so much but this always happens like with the Spiderman films. I hope they make a sequel to X-Men First Class. I rate it an 8 out of 10. I recommend people to watch it, I’m currently still obsessing over it.

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No banshee or Riptide again

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They're so perfect!



-Scissorhands
Posted by Scissorhands at 8:18 AM
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:37 am

http://www.doctorlawyerpriest.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class-b.html

Tuesday, July 5, 2011
X Men: First Class - B

In theaters. Rated R, 131 minutes. Trailer.

Given the films I review every summer, its obvious that the superhero film is not my favorite genre. But, the positive reviews and directorial pedigree (Matthew Vaughn) put me in the theater. The film traces the origins of each of the X-Men and the current alignment of the mutants. We begin with Magneto's (Michael Fassbender) experiences in the concentration camps during World War 2 and then get on with the others with mixed success. Click below for more on XMFC:

We see Professor X (James McAvoy) and Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) meet as children and then get recruited by the CIA (agents played by Rose Byrne and Oliver Platt). They use Professor X's telepathic powers to recruit the other mutants to battle the bad mutants led by a horribly miscast Kevin Bacon and his wooden sidekicks (they are like something out of the Batman and Robin TV show; except for Emma Frost (ably played by January Jones...). The assembly of the mutants is VERY pedestrian and uninteresting, stylish as it may be put together.

I was very bored by pretty much everything except the relationship between Magneto and Professor X as they semi-wrestle with a few difficult issues. They present the only adult storyline in an otherwise kid-friendly film. The film was a pretty solid B- until the final scene on the beach, which nearly lifted it to B+ because of its existential and Magneto-heavy sequences.

Fassbender is the best thing about the film and, combined with his elegant performance in Inglorious Basterds, has pretty much solidified himself as one of my favorite actors. He conveys intelligence and intensity along with a little panache in both films - he should immediately be handed the 007 franchise, post-haste.

Posted by Lawyer at 11:23 PM
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:38 am

http://brucewood.info/celebritydaily.info/2011/07/05/movie-review-x-men-first-class-2011-2/

Movie Review: X-Men: First Class (2011)
Posted on 2011/07/05 by Gabriella

by Tony Dayoub

Given the decline of the X-Men movie franchise?which peaked fairly early with Bryan Singer’s X2: X-Men United (not just one of the best in this series, but one of the best superhero films, period) before ending up in the execrable X-Men: The Last Stand and the disappointing X-Men Origins: Wolverine?one would be justified in choosing to avoid the latest entry sight unseen. But the anomalous X-Men: First Class turns out to be one of the most surprising summer blockbuster hopefuls in quite a long time. The cheesy comic-book costumes glimpsed in the preview hinted that this may have initially been planned as a slapdash film hastened to the box office for fear that studio distributor 20th Century Fox’s rights to the series would revert back to Marvel. However, director Matthew Vaughn (Kick-Ass) turns the inherent camp quotient into a virtue, giving us a stylized, period look at the secret history of the mutant group and its origins, at times channeling the espionage-laden eccentricities of the early 007 films.

Playing Bond in this one is Michael Fassbender (Jane Eyre) as Magneto, né Erik Lehnsherr, a holocaust survivor who uses his mutant abilities of lethal control over metals to further his globetrotting Nazi-hunting mission. As he gets closer to his nemesis, Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon)?Schmidt, in his days as a sadistic Nazi doctor?Erik meets Charles Xavier (James McAvoy), a powerful telepath recruited by the U.S. government to gather a mutant team dedicated to stopping Shaw from inciting humanity’s armageddon.

Some of the best moments in X-Men: First Class come in the early part of the film, as Vaughn uses the period, early 1960s setting to supercharge the otherwise conventional movie. Erik’s turtlenecks, narrow trousers and short boots, his cutting sense of humor, and confident swagger evoke the Sean Connery of Goldfinger (1964) or From Russia with Love (1963). The wild, sexually provocative costumes which barely cover Shaw’s sidekick, the glittery telepath Emma Frost (January Jones), are easily explained by the front Shaw uses?a Las Vegas swingers’ hot-spot known as the Hellfire Club?as a cover for influencing the global power-brokers on his payroll. Frequent appearances by JFK remind us that this was a time both filled with promise for the future and dread for the nuclear Sword of Damocles which hung over both the U.S. and the Soviet Union and, as a result, the rest of the world.

Now, lest you think my enjoyment of X-Men: First Class was without reservations, here they are: The allegorical aspects of the franchise that equate the shame of mutation with closeted homosexuality float on the surface of the film. Any of the subtlety used to camouflage the topicality of the first two films is absent here. Also, the actresses in the film (perhaps the only exception being the capable Rose Byrne) are in over their heads. Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone) displays none of the talent that garnered her an Oscar nomination last year, reading her dialogue flatly. Zoë Kravitz seems to have been cast mainly to capitalize on the intrinsic promotional angles associated with being Lenny Kravitz and Lisa Bonet’s daughter. As for January Jones, is she a bad actress or what? Cast in the largest of the female roles, one wonders not only how she got away with projecting such a dull persona as a character that should stand out simply for the way she vamps it up as the film’s designated eye candy, but if Jones ever really merited any of the attention she received as Betty Draper on the acclaimed TV series, Mad Men? Kevin Bacon fares marginally better as the movie’s big baddie, but essentially his performance is yet another variation on the same smug asshole he’s played since he made his debut in Animal House.

Flawed as it is, X-Men: First Class has two stellar things going for it?a couple of charismatic leads in McAvoy and Fassbender. Both share the kind of chemistry and easy camaraderie often seen in the best movie duos like Douglas and Lancaster, Lemmon and Matthau, and Newman and Redford. They bring equal parts gravitas and humor to their parts, leavening the juvenile dialogue beyond its obviousness. For Fassbender in particular, who has long toiled in the world of indies but is unknown to most of the general public, this should be a star-making performance. If the producers of X-Men: First Class wish to ensure their franchise’s longevity, they should lock down Fassbender and McAvoy now, and start prodding their screenwriters to find something for the mutant team to fight in the Nixon Era.

Source: http://www.cinemaviewfinder.com/2011/06/movie-review-x-men-first-class-2011.html
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:42 am

http://robotgeekscultcinema.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class.html

7.05.2011
X-Men: First Class
I should warn you right off the bat that I was actually going to the theater to see the new Transformers flick. But, being as it was 4th of July weekend, I should have figured it would be sold out. So this was my secondary choice, which might reflect my overall feeling about it because honestly, I was really in the mood for a mindless action flick with nothing but destruction and mayhem on the mind.
But oh well. I have been wanting to see it though, ever since it first came out a few weeks back. I just never got a chance to get to the theater. And with comic book films, I'm all over them. I'll see them all sooner or later. Thor was a nice surprise. Solid and entertaining throughout with a lead that demands your attention and Kenneth Branagh's sure handed and confidant direction. I'm really sad to hear that Branagh won't be returning to direct Thor 2. I thought he did wonders with the material. Green Lantern is an exception though. I have no desire to see it. It just doesn't look very good to me.

In my feeling this is the best of the series. It has the style of the 1st one, but the grandness of the 2nd. I think setting it in the 60's with all the mod decor and pimpin' suits was a brilliant idea. It gives it a new atmosphere that was seriously lacking after the 1st. In this one, Mathew Vaughn takes over as director. Interestingly enough, he was supposed to direct part 3 but bowed out in the last minute because he didn't want to be so far away for so long from his family. Who knows what kind of 3rd entry we could have gotten had he ended up directing it. We can only guess. To be fair, I think Brett Ratner did the best he could under the circumstances. Part 3 isn't great by a long shot, but I don't think it's the train wreck everyone makes it out to be. I mean hey, it made more money than any of the other X-Men flicks in the franchise. Doesn't that say something? But that's another story.

X-Men: First Class takes place in the 60's during the Cuban missile crisis. We see how Charles Xavier/Professor X and Erik Lehnsherr/Magneto first meet and ultimately become close friends. They realize that they aren't the only mutants on the planet and with help from the government, set out to locate and recruit as many as they can. That's where we meet a band of mutants who in some cases stay with the X-Men and some who ultimately turn to the dark side with Magneto. That's about as simple as I can put it without getting into the whole plot involving a possible World War III started by the villain of the film Sebastian Shaw, played to dry perfection by the always reliable Kevin Bacon. Because this plot ultimately is what drives the story and the movie. You see, Sebastian Shaw wants to wreck havoc on the planet by starting a nuclear war, hoping that the regular humans on the planet perish and the mutants reign supreme. That's the perfect world he envisions. The world where he becomes ruler.

I was surprised at how they changed some of the principle characters of the X-Men. I was never a die hard X-Men comic book fan, as I've been one since the mid 80's. But I do remember that Storm and Cyclops were indeed in the original lineup. There is a scene in the film when Xavier first uses that special helmet designed and created by Hank McCoy/Beast that he so often uses starting with the 1st film when trying to locate other mutants. In this scene if you look closely, you see a 2 second image of a young Storm and Cyclops. So I guess that counts. I think they even might have created a character from scratch with Angel, played by Zoe Kravitz. But I could be wrong. That decision to change the lineup of the X-Men kind of left a lot of people wondering wtf? I will give the casting director props though, because this cast is stellar. Though I never would have imagined James McAvoy as a young Xavier, he plays him with such sincerity that even though he walks and has a full head of hair, you imagine Professor X. He's that good. And Michael Fassbender as Magneto is just brilliant casting. The guy is intense when he's not even trying. He brings such a ferocity to the character that even with just a cold stare, he can cut you in half. Jennifer Lawrence as Raven/Mystique was great, as was Nicholas Hoult as Hank McCoy/Beast and the other mutants. Though I didn't even know it at the time, Jason Flemming plays one of the baddie mutants Azazel and he looked awesome! Like one of the coolest looking devils I've seen on film in a long time. The only real complaint I really had was January Jones as Emma Frost. I just don't get it. Why is this chick so popular? I know she's on Mad Men. But why is she considered a sex symbol? In the entire movie, she's either in a bra and super short mini skirt or a skin tight white leather outfit that leaves nothing to the imagination and I just don't see how she's as popular as she is. And I haven't even gotten into her acting yet. It's as bland as it could possibly be. I suppose her popularity is what helped get her this role, but they could have done so much better.

The setting is what really sets this one apart and makes it it's own. Like I said, the 60's mod setting really makes a big difference here. The decor, the clothes, it gives it all such a refreshing look. The effects are outstanding and Vaughn's direction is solid. It's interesting how he can adapt his style to what material he's working with. With Kickass, it's so much more vibrant and in your face graphic with inventive and hyper-kinetic camera work. Here he's so much more subdued and if I didn't already know before going into this, I could have sworn Bryan Singer directed the thing himself. That's not a knock on Vaughn's ability either. Some of Singer's best camera work is on the 1st X-Men, even with the limited budget constraints. But with Singer doing story and producing duties on this one, it's definitely got his stamp all over it. But Vaughn is really the one who deserves credit for making the thing look classy and for keeping the movie moving along smoothly. It's pretty damn entertaining from the get-go, with hardly ever a moment of dullness. Especially when we've finally met all these other mutants as they start showing off what powers they have as they finally feel comfortable to let there hair down. It's a fun sequence. The last quarter of the film is simply amazing and probably the best sequence from any of the X-Men films. The threat of a war keeps you on the edge of your seat with Magneto really being the only deciding factor of whether this war happens or not. Also in this last quarter Magneto realizes his full potential as a mutant and it's pretty awesome. Another element that makes this one stand out from the others is Henry Jackman's rockin' score. It's got a lot of guitar riffs and believe it or not, really makes the movie pulse. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone younger than 8 because the whole political angle would bore them to death. But for adults it's definitely First Class. Get it?

Posted by robotGEEK at 7:00 PM
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:43 am

http://silverscreeners.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class-2011.html

Tuesday, July 5, 2011
X-Men: First Class (2011)

2011 is indeed the “Year of the Franchise” with a record-setting twenty-seven sequels, prequels and remakes being released in cinemas. Some have been pleasant surprises; others have been awful. I loved the first two X-Men films but disliked the third and fourth. With low expectations I entered the theater to witness the prequel stories of my favorite mutants.

Erik Lehnsherr is separated from his parents as they are hauled to a German concentration camp (an almost shot-for-shot reproduction of the opening scene in the original X-Men). After a display of his mutant abilities, Erik is tortured, experimented on and forced to witness the brutal death of his mother. Years later, Erik plots his revenge on the Nazis and the brute that killed his mother. During his quest, he meets Charles Xavier, a mutant helping the government avert a nuclear holocaust. The two develop a strong friendship and together they train a team of young mutants to prevent the start of World War III. But the differences in ideologies between the friends threaten to destroy not only their friendship but the world itself.

X-Men: First Class is a political film, and it raises some very interesting questions about prejudice, discrimination, evolution and the goodness of man. The treatment of mutants is analogized to the treatment of Jews in World War II. Erik believes that, like Jews, mutants will eventually be considered a threat to the government and thus imprisoned and annihilated. Charles maintains a faith in humanity. The dialogues between Charles and Erik over these issues are thought-provoking and disheartening as the humans confirm Erik’s views. The following exchange in particular stood out to me:

Charles: Erik, you said yourself: we're the better men. This is the time to prove it. There are thousands of men on those ships: good, honest, innocent men. They're just following orders!

Erik: I've been at the mercy of men just following orders...never again!


The plot is excellent. It’s unpredictable and suspenseful. However, since this is a prequel, some of the character development feels a bit rushed, the filmmakers hurrying to put the characters in position for the “first” X-Men film. Though the audience knows that Erik becomes Magneto—villain of the later films—his transformation into the brutal arch-nemesis is devastating. This is a credit to the acting which is outstanding from every single member of the film’s ensemble cast, including James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne, Jennifer Lawrence, and Kevin Bacon.

The drama takes place in the ‘60s and the film’s technical aspects beautifully reflect this era. The cinematography is stylistically antique and the film grain gives the movie a classic look and feel. The special effects, while topnotch, also feel wondrously oldfangled due to an obvious reliance on real stunts and actual explosions rather than constant CGI. The score is loud and orchestral—a throwback to Bernard Herrmann and John Barry—and can be enjoyed off-screen.

There is some strong language in the film, but it is not pervasive. Many shots focus on women in lingerie and Mystique appears fully “nude” in a couple scenes, arrayed only in her blue skin and leaving little to the imagination. Several crude jokes, sexual references and implications of sex are also present. It is also surprisingly violent at times, unusual for a PG-13 film.

X-Men: First Class is the best of the X-Men franchise, featuring a deeper plot, better dialogue and more character than its predecessors. The look and feel are perfectly suited to the period, the acting is outstanding, the visual effects stunning and the themes rich and thought-provoking. These attributes make it not only the best film of the year thus far but also one of the best superhero movies ever made. This is definitely a must-see.

Posted by Michael at 5:20 PM
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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:44 am

http://retrocriticblog.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class-review.html

06/07/2011
X-MEN: FIRST CLASS - REVIEW

The rise and fall of the X-Men films sure went quick and fast. Not that the first two were all that perfect but when the messy third came along that was something of a blow. The lacklustre Wolverine Origins prequel followed and pretty much confirmed that the X magic was well and truly...ex magic,

So how do you follow a lifeless X-Men prequel?

With another of course!

The weird thing is that looking at the reviews the film received so far, people liked it! They lapped it up! And here I was facepalming my way through yet another damp squib X-Men film which not only managed to miss the point entirely but delivered what has to be the least interesting X film so far.

Lets forget for one second the overall quality of the film and its hit-and-miss links to the other films and the comics: is this honestly the X-Men film we want to see? Who was this made for? Who demanded yet another prequel starring mostly uninteresting mutants doing mostly uninteresting things in the 60's? Will we ever get Gambit, Rogue and the gang battling Sentinels or Apocalypse in a Blade Runner-style futuristic city?

No, we want Kevin freakin' Bacon...

For one thing, the cast ranges from plain awful to acceptable with Jennifer Lawrence's Mystique ruining every scene she's in, a wooden January Jones looking decidedly silly and a decent enough Michael Fassbender doing his damndest to bring some energy to the proceedings.

The special effects feel, for the most part, unimpressive and it really looks like the entire budget went towards that submarine scene at the end, which the trailers delighted in spoiling for us. This is a very bland, soulless attempt at an X-Men film to say the least and I for one felt completely underwhelmed by it. The promised Magneto Origins (which essentially this was meant to be) could have been a step up from Wolverine but instead we have this gap-filler.

I'll never understand why X-Men First Class was so well received, perhaps it was Fassbender's charisma that did it or Bacon's cool demeanour, I have no idea. For me, this is a new low for an already sinking series and when you have material this fun, this exciting with about a million colourful characters and creative storylines to choose from, a limp attempt like this one is pretty inexcusable.

Dull.

I'll watch X2 again thank you very much.

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Post by Admin on Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:47 am

http://silverscreen-dontneedroads.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class-2011.html

Tuesday, 5 July 2011
X-Men: First Class (2011)
What's it all about? It is towards the end of WWII and children are emerging with mutations, many of which manifest themselves as special abilities. Raven can change her physical appearance and is taken in by Charles Xavier, a telepath. Eric Lensherr meanwhile has found that he can manipulate metal, but is in the hands of a ruthless and vicious Nazi scientist, Sebastian Shaw, who is preoccupied with mutant abilities. As we fast-forward to the 1960's, the Cold War is escalating, Shaw is gathering a mutant army and Xavier and Lensherr begin to round up those who will go onto become Xavier's X-Men.

*****

What's it like? Having lost its way with X-Men: The Last Stand and the terrible spin-off Wolverine, The X-Men franchise needed a fresh start very badly. In came director Matthew Vaughn and screenwriter Jane Goldman, who had refreshed the genre as a whole with their profane and violent but nonetheless successful and popular Kick-Ass. What they have given us is a reboot of considerable quality and enjoyment, if perhaps not quite as accomplished as its next closest reboot comparison, 2009's Star Trek. The early scenes with Lensherr in a concentration camp are suitably violent and bleak, Vaughn wisely refusing to gloss over the terrifying realities of the Holocaust. It's not trying to be Schindlers List or The Pianist, but it is at least tonally appropriate. We quickly move on to the early 1960's and find Eric Lensherr travelling the globe like 007, fully utilising his considerable powers and tracking Nazi war criminals as he goes. In some ways this sequence is over too soon, so much do we enjoy it, but there are more mutants to meet, teams to be formed and battle-lines to be drawn.

Slotting the Cuban Missile Crisis into the story of the birth of the X-Men is audacious, but it just about works. Xavier starts gathering together his young pupils and we see them develop and control their powers, with a couple of fun but foul-mouthed cameos on the way. Eventually we see how Xavier and Lensherr come to be at odds with each other but it is all very intelligently developed and although a lot of ground is covered fast, the various character arcs are convincingly delivered. Chief credit for that goes to the principals. As Xavier and Lensherr respectively we have James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender who bring real strength and heft to their roles. Both of them are clearly having a lot of fun with their roles, especially McAvoy who gives us a much breezier Xavier than we've known from the previous films. Jennifer Lawrence builds on her Oscar-nominated work in Winter's Bone with an affecting performance as Raven/Mystique, though the rest of the youngsters have insufficient room to breath. Kevin Bacon is no surprise as an excellent villain, being far from one-dimensional, though his cohorts are virtually silent and therefore mostly anonymous, making their motives and intentions hard to divine.

Some have hailed this as the best comic book film since The Dark Knight, which I think is a little generous. Heck, it's not even the best comic book film of the year (take a bow, Thor), but it is excellent, exciting, very funny and a massive improvement on the last couple of films in the franchise. It left me hungry for Second Class, which must be a good sign.

*****

Should I see it? As a general answer, yes. It has a lot to say about identity, self-image, self-acceptance, conformity, forgiveness and self-control and these are themes that we should consider and chew over with each other. Having said that, there is a fair amount of overt sexuality on show and virtually every female character displays an unhelpful and unnecessary amount of cleavage. Scantily clad women abound and so therefore the film's 12A certificate should generally be treated as a recommendation that under 12's not see the film at all. There is some pretty wince-making violence and the now customary "it's a 12A so we can use the f-word once" thing. I'm not sure where this has come from, but it seems to now be the norm, so be warned. Some may find the portrayal of mind-reading and telekinesis unpalatable from a Christian perspective, though this is never presented as occult activity, rather the result of genetic mutation. As in all things, let your conscience guide you. If your 12+ children (i.e. your children over the age of twelve, I assume/hope you don't have more than 12 children) want o see this, try to see it with them. They may not be keen on the idea, so you may have to bribe them by offering to pay, but it will be worth it to be able to open up a conversation about the film's themes and to see what your children think about the film's presentation of its female characters. Worth checking out, though caution is advised.
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:24 pm

http://whatareweseeing.blogspot.com/2011/07/x-men-first-class.html

Friday, 8 July 2011
X Men First Class
Despite enjoying the other three X Men films I’ve always felt they were lacking something but I never knew what, but whatever it is X Men First Class had it and then some! I was on the edge of my seat the whole film!

The film opens in much the same way as the first X Men; with a flashback to Magneto’s childhood as he and his parents are rounded up into concentration camps. The film then skips to a conversation being had between the young Magneto and a Nazi doctor in the form of Kevin Bacon (whom I was not expecting to see at all!) and we discover that Bacon is attempting to force Magneto to unleash his powers. We also see the meeting of a young Professor X and Mystique and the film follows their difficult relationship throughout. Flash forward and an older Magneto is attempting to exact revenge on Bacon and anyone else involved in his past, whilst Professor X is hired by an FBI officer to try and discover what the evil Kevin Bacon and a group of other mutants are planning. Magneto and Xavier get together and hire other mutants, including Mystique, to form an army to battle it out with Bacon and his mutant army as he tries to start WW3. The film ends in a fantastic climax that made my jaw drop and forced tears to well up in my eyes!

The film was non-stop action and had excellent character development. I loved seeing all the ins and outs of Xavier and Magnetos relationship and it broke my heart to remember that they become sworn enemies in the future. That’s a point as well, the film gave those who have seen the earlier trilogy lovely little inside jokes with lines such as this one from Xavier “I’ll be going bald next” and sneak glimpses of a young Storm. (Hugh Jackman’s mini cameo is also excellent!)

All of the actors were perfect for the roles and there was no one that I would have replaced, also if you like eye candy in your films then you will not be disappointed with First Class because almost every actor was simply gorgeous! (Michael Fassbender in particular.) We saw a good amount of new mutants who I desperately wish had been in the earlier films as I preferred them a lot more to characters such as the toad guy from the first X Men or the Juggernaut from X Men The Last Stand. The story was gripping and well-paced so I never wanted to take my eyes off the screen.

All in all a fantastic prequel to a mediocre series! I’m half hoping that they’ll consider remaking the original trilogy but we’ll have to wait and see about that!

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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:38 pm

http://ellensburgfilmfestival.wordpress.com/2011/07/07/x-men-first-class-review/

First Impressions: X-Men: First Class

Review by: Josh Perrault

After finally seeing Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class it reaffirmed that there is no doubt in my mind that X-Men is one of the, if not the greatest comic book movie franchise of our time. Despite the rough first impressions of the last two films in the X-Men franchise (X-Men: The Last Stand and X-Men Origins: Wolverine), X-Men: First Class is just what the franchise needed to give it the justice it needs of this long-loved action hero series. X-Men: First Class takes place in the early 1960s during the Cuban Missile Crisis and focuses on Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Magneto (Michael Fassbender) and the beginning of Xavier’s X-Men and Magneto’s Brotherhood of Mutants. The film has an amazing supporting cast consisting of Kevin Bacon as Sebastian Shaw, a mutant and long time enemy of Magneto plotting to take over the world, Jennifer Lawrence as Mystique, Rose Byrne as Dr. Moira MacTaggert, among many others including a cameo by Hugh Jackman as Wolverine.

James McAvoy portrays a whole new side to Charles Xavier we had never had the chance to see until now. This is the Charles Xavier who drank, womanized, walked, and even had hair. McAvoy’s take on the young version of the beloved old man in the wheelchair is nearly perfect as the film goes on and more and more well-known characteristics of the Xavier we have previously seen on the screen begin to unfold.

On McAvoy’s other side is Michael Fassbender as Erik Lehnsherr, or Magneto. The story of Magneto tends to drive the film overall. The film starts out as a recreation of the opening of the first X-Men film, as Erik as a child in a Nazi concentration camp. As his mother and father are taken away from him, Erik shows his mutation as he bends and tears away at the metal gates before him. Though the scene has been showed before in a previous X-Men film, I believe that it is the perfect setup, as the scene is taken even further creating a more traumatic origin story of Magneto. In this case, all the talk of a Magneto origins film should be out of the picture. The same goes for making another Wolverine origins film, but I digress. Throughout the film we see Erik become more and more infatuated with killing the man who made him who he is, Sebastian Shaw. While on the other hand, Charles Xavier is all about peace and harmony amongst the mutants and the rest of the human race. Despite their differences Erik and Charles form a bond that at one time puts them on the same team, though we see otherwise in the previous films.

The X-Men series, like many action hero franchises, has seen its ups and downs. The first two films, X-Men and X2, were a huge hit in the box office as well as amongst fans and critics. However, though doing very well in the box office, X-Men: The Last Stand and X-Men Origins: Wolverine, did not get the same appreciation. Director Matthew Vaughn had a lot on his shoulders to get the love and appreciation back for this series. And he did just that. Amongst having to bring the franchise back up on its feet, the film needed to be able to tell a very interesting story while not leaving out the crucial elements of the previous films. On top of that, origin stories tend to be a difficult task on their own. However, Vaughn easily pulled it off, and there is no doubt that X-Men: First Class will be listed among J.J. Abram’s Star Trek and Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins as the standard outline of how a fantastic prequel should be made.

The film contains just about everything needed in a prequel to such a well-known series. Though there is a lot to take in as both the Magneto and Charles Xavier characters do a great deal of changing amongst the backdrop of the CIA and actual historic events, while at the same time Sebastian Shaw is doing his own dirty work to cause world panic and ultimately have the world at his own will. The film does justice to truly explain the origin of all the tiny little details we see in the original film series. We learn how Charles Xavier was put in his famous ‘X’ wheel chair. We learn how Beast became, well, a beast. We also learn where Magneto’s infamous helmet came from and its extremely significant history as far as the character of Magneto goes. There is definitely a lot to take in, but the film still drives you into keeping interested and on the edge of your seat.
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:51 pm

http://flagpole.com/Weekly/MovieDope/MovieDope-13Jul11

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) Considering my interest in the X-Men wanes by 90 percent when Wolverine isn’t involved, it’s a good thing the last 10 includes Professor X and Magneto. With Kick-Ass filmmaker Matthew Vaughn in charge, X-Men: First Class is what the third X-movie should have been. A prequel to the preceding cinematic issues, X-Men Zero explains how Professor Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Erik Lehnsherr, AKA Magneto (Michael Fassbender), came to be friends and then mortal enemies. With Hellfire Club members Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) and Emma Frost (January Jones) plotting nuclear war against the backdrop of the Cuban Missile Crisis, Xavier must train his first class of mutants—including series vets Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) and Beast (Nicholas Hoult)—to control their powers. With its early-'60s style (Shaw’s sub has a swank white interior) and Cold War tensions, X-Zero exceeds its predecessors in energy, style and fun. Smart casting decisions (not to mention some sweet cameos) more than make up for some C-list mutants (Darwin?! Riptide?!). No disrespect to X2, but this fourth entry in the superhero franchise is the first X-film to fully live up to the property’s huge potential. Now give Vaughn some cool X-Men to work with already.
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 10:57 pm

http://www.friedeye.com/2011/07/01/x-men-first-class/

X-Men: First Class
Jul 01, 2011 No Comments by Parmita Borah

Director:

Matthew Vaughn
Writers:

Ashley Miller (screenplay), Zack Stentz(screenplay), Jane Goldman (screenplay), Matthew Vaughn (screenplay), Sheldon Turner (story) and Bryan Singer (story)
Stars:

James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender and Jennifer Lawrence


With 3D technology making huge waves in the world of cinema, it is a huge risk for any Hollywood director to make a film from the X-Men franchise in 2D. X-Men First Class dares to take that risk with no 3D and no Wolverine and yet manages to give a new dimension to all the X-Men movies we have seen earlier.

The story is set as a prequel to all the X-Men flicks and takes us to the time when Professor X wasn’t bald, and Magneto didn’t wear that stupid metal headgear on his head. Magneto, as it turns out was quite a treat in his heydays; a tragic anti-hero so to say, much like our Angry Young Bachchan (minus the redundant dialogues). For all those who follow X-Men Comics would get nostalgic to see a teenaged Mystique and a covert Beast. The other characters too are well detailed and contribute to the events that lead to the Dharmayudh and eventually the separation of buddies Professor X and Magneto.

The look and feel of the movie has a mild retro tint to it which is actually nice. The transformation of the young unsure mutants into powerful and confident superheroes is well sketched out and well portrayed. The CGI is not outstanding, but complements the story. Some scenes although would remind you of “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” and “Hancock”. The script manages to evoke the right emotions at the right time and tickle the funny bones a couple of times with some witty dialogues and scenes.

The film did have some unintentionally funny moments and goof ups to. For instance The Beast’s transformation and entry felt like a low budget spoof scene. The irony of his wish to “look better attempt gone wrong” was reflected in the Halloween mask that he was made to wear in all probability by an underpaid makeup man. The scene where Professor X’s gets shot and paralyzed sadly reminded of an “Ooh! Aah! Ouch! moment”, from a pain balm/iodex commercial. Erik Lensherr a.k.a Magneto breaks Emma Frost’s neck and says she can never transform into diamond again, while we see her returning to her diamond form before closing credits.

After a disastrous movie like Woverine (reminiscent of 80’s Bollywood inspired revenge movie), X-Men First Class manages to create a completely fresh feel to the franchise. The script is crisp yet detailed, direction is simply stylish and performances of Kevin Bacon, James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender bring an amazing level of sophistication to the show. Director Matthew Vaughn ‘s deliberate choice to tell a story the old school way was a big risk. Did the risk pay? Well, let me put it this way, I took a friend along to watch this movie and she’s someone who hates superhero and mutant stuff. When the credits rolled, she asked me if there would be a sequel to this movie!
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Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 11:00 pm

http://www.samnmatt.com/2011/07/sams-flog-why-sam-doesnt-like-x-men.html

Friday, July 1, 2011
Sam's Flog: Why Sam Doesn't Like X-Men: First Class (Consists of SPOILERS)

Okay, so episode 38 covered both Matt and mine's opinions of the new X-Men movie. I really shied away from argument on the episode and let Matt say what he wanted to say because I could have carried on the entire episode, and as frustrating as it is to me, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. But if there's something Matt's appreciation of this flick shows, it's that a non-X-Men fan, or a casual X-Men fan will enjoy this film much more than those who love the comics and have loyalty invested in the first two films. 2000's X-Men, which may seem dated by today's standards, is still the first real successful comic book movie adaptation of the new millenium to start a movement of comic book films we're still seeing trend today. And personally I think it still holds up. But even if you have qualms with the rough introductory 1 hour and 40 minute try out that was X-Men, I don't see how 2003's X2: X-Men United doesn't completely deliver almost everything you could ask for in an awesome comic book film and sequel for that matter. It was a solid, character driven, well crafted action packed second installment to what could have been a fantastic trilogy.

That's when Bryan Singer went to do Superman Returns and Fox films, being the whores they are, couldn't wait to get the third film out there. So they brought in the s$#! pile that is Brett Ratner to direct as well as swap writers for a reason I don't know of to make a film that, as my brother sums it up more punctually than I can, basically says to its audience: "Hey, do you like X-Men? Well f&#! YOU!" Basically the third film throws everything it can in a poor pathetic fashion and decides to kill everybody or de-mutant them in a sh*#&%-ass closing to what could have been a great trilogy.

If ruining the solidity and quality of a two part franchise wasn't enough, the solo Wolverine film that was supposed to be the first in a series of individual origin stories for X-Men characters was probably even worse than the third X-Men film. They were going to make a film called X-Men Origins: Magneto but after the reception and box office failure of Wolverine, and I'm guessing some angry chat boards, they decided to give Bryan Singer a call, and see if they couldn't make an origin story with more of a callback to the first two films. Or at least that's what I was told and decieved through advertisement to believe.

Here is a list of all the things I really didn't like about X-Men: First Class. It will contain SPOILERS and it will probably not be in chronological order, but I am going to try and get everything out of my system I can. But do understand, I tried very hard to like this film. I really did.

1. Kevin Bacon as a nazi...
Okay, I can't speak German, he seems to be doing fine (even though two people I know who studied German say different), so fair enough. The opening scene where he shoots Erik's mother in front of him right next to an eerie torture room is a powerful moment. Still though, that's a very distracting casting decision. I seriously considered singing "Footloose" outloud as soon as I saw him on screen, it seemed so out of place. And I like Kevin Bacon. Tremors and Stir of Echoes all the way, but he belongs in comic relief-type parts like his character Jock, in this years much more indie super hero film "Super."

2. Little boy Charles and little girl Mystique... Okay, first off, I hate it when Mystique takes the form of something either way smaller or way bigger than herself. How is little girl mystique taking the form of Charles's mama, who's more than double her size? Just seems to be pushing her abilities a bit far. And yes I understand it's a comic book character, but every world you make needs boundaries, fictional or not.

Second of all, this scene is f#%@#&! retarded. Where did Mystique come from? Where are the g*&^%$# parents? This little boy, no matter how aristocratic, could not be talking like that and making such final decisions and not being freaked out at all by a little blue gremlin in his kitchen. And unless he hid Mystique in a closet or killed the housemaid and took her take her place, how the f&#! did he get her to be his adopted sister for the next ten years or so? These are the kinds of things a movie needs to set up, and I don't care if it would have slowed the film down; when you make decisions like this you need to show more exposition. I wanted to see the parents and understand how Mystique was able to be raised alongside Charles. It would have cemented the otherwise vague backstory and told us more about Xavier's world growing up anyway.

But furthermore, how does this make any connection to the first two films when there was never once any interaction between Mystique and Prof X or any inference to be found of them once being close? We have our first nonesensical continuity discrepency right off the bat. Way to go already.

3. Charles Xavier has walked in the comics before, but I'm fairly certain he's always been bald. Okay, I can live with this one, but it's just one big hit of not following the comics.

4. Kevin Bacon as Sebastian Shaw. Wait... he's going to be the villain for the entire movie? Wait... he has a secret lair in a Las Vegas casino, dresses like a pimp, and has a luxury submarine? He's a mutant, too? So Kevin Bacon is now a pimped out mutant Bond villian... in an X-Men film... What the motherfuck? That's distracting, cheesy, and stupid as all hell.
5. Kevin Bacon's "energy absorbption" power looks stupid special effects wise He basically just shakes around, making a double vison looking effect with his face and hands. I call it "Double Bacon."

6. At one point we're here, now we're there! I hate it when movies don't pace scene transitions right. Charles is all gung ho for finding Sebastian Shaw with the CIA immediately, and the entire shift from being in a parking garage to being on a boat late at night finding Magneto in the water (which Magneto was pretty cool in this scene, I must confess) just felt off, and the music felt overdone and cheesy. Not sure what could have made this work better but it's clearly an issue in scene pacing. On the subject of music:

7. Where the f&#! did the score go? Sure, the music in this movie is okay, Matthew Vaughn does some cool stuff with a few 60's songs and even does a montage featuring an instrumental verson of the Gnarles Barkley song "Run," which is stylized anachronism I don't have a problem with, really. But the theme music, the orchestrated scores, were okay at best, but at times overbearing and silly as a backdrop.

Worst of all, there might, MIGHT, have been one scene to use a motif from the original X-Men score from the Singer films, but aside from that there was none of it. And the score from the first two X-Men films is badass. Tell me it's cheesy and I'll knock your teeth out. It rocks, and if they wanted to get back to the glory days like they made out as though they were trying to do, they would have pulled out that badass score.

But then again, it's almost better they didn't, because this s$#! going on on screen with that music would have felt like sacrilege anyway. Catch 22 I suppose.

Lots of Superhero films suffer sh*#&% background music, and this is why we need Han Zimmer to do everything himself these days, poor bastard.

8. The mutant lineup... Remember in X-Men Origins: Wolverine when they forced Gambit into an origin story just to please all the fans who were pissed that they never once introduced him in the other three films? Remember how lame that was? They kinda do the same thing here, making sure the only X-Men we see here other than Prof X and Magneto are ones not previously introduced, aside from Beast. The "First Class" is comprised of Havoc, Banshee, Darwin (temporarily) Angel, BUT not our Angel, intead it's a bug-winged Zoe Kravitz (yes, Lenny Kravitz's daughter) who is an utter bitch on wings, at early stages Mystique, and of course Beast.

Of course it's impossible to really have the first class from the comics if you're aiming for a prequel, since the original comic lineup is Cyclops, Gene Grey, Iceman, Beast and the real Angel, who according to the other flicks only one of is possibly old enough to join in in 1963, and that's Beast.

But aside from Banshee, Beast and Havoc, who I'm happy to see. What the f&#! are this bug winged c*** and Darwin doing in the lineup?


Oh, wait, apparently they're newer X-men characters introduced in the last 15 years or so that are minor and no one cares about enough, so we can do whatever we want with them. Including kill one off really quick for slapdash dramatic appeal. That's why.

And aside from that, these characters have no real back story other than being snatched up by Charles and Erik for the X-Men. It really felt like a lot of the film had no clue what to do with these characters development-wise other than give them stupid funny lines and show them getting ready to fight.

The Hellfire Club lineup is Azazel (Played by Jason Flemyng, which I never would have known had I not checked the cast list), Emma Frost, Riptide, eventually Angel and Mystique, and of course Sebastian Shaw. Which is also strange, but I'll explain later.

9. Banshee has no Irish accent...


Okay, once again, sounds like a minor complaint. But they went ahead and cast a kid who is utterly red headed, so why not give him an Irish accent? In the comics, Banshee's Irishness was exposed in every talk bubble he ever spoke, and it was supposed to give a wordly feel for mutants. In this, he's just a snotty little teen, whose likeable in a dorky way I suppose.

How hard would it have been to give him a g*&^%$# accent? Hell, most of the cast was probably European! As a matter of fact, I'm fairly certain the two leads are Irish! It's called research!

10. Did Banshee Kill those fish? Did he kill those fish or make them swim away in that aquarium scene? Either way

10.5. Those fish were CGIed awfully.

11. Havoc... Something's just off here. Aside from Havoc being introduced as that badass who "Is the only prisoner who prefers to be in solitary!" who ends up just being an angsty teen instead of some kind of juggernaut, we know nothing about him or his family, including his lil bro Cyclops. He never, to my knowledge, ever shot lazers from his chest but always shot beams directly from his hands. Here he has an almost boomerang type ability he throws out from his arms, which is cool, but why did they even f&#! with the dumb chest thing then? I could be wrong, but for god's sake, just give us the Havoc we know and love from the comics.

12. Angel... (technically it's "Angel Salvadore") I hate this character. She's almost metaphysical in her ability to unfold tattoo wings into little bug wings that make her able to fly, yet look like strips of cellophane that could come nowhere near being able to support her weight.

I did some research on the comic character and she was invented by Grant Morrison, already souring the plate. In the comic she's more like an actual housefly and doesn't have the ability to spit little chunks of hot asteroid-like rocks, instead she vomits acidic gunk that pre-digests her food like that of a fly. So why didn't she just do that? That would have been way cooler. Brundle-Fly style!

Aside from this and the fact that she introduces a whole other bag of confusion being named Angel when the original Angel is a badass bird-winged X-Men, appropriately named Angel, this character's just a whiney bitch. She pisses and moans after an assumably short amount of time that she can't take being seen as a mutant, so she joins the evil mutant league headed by a g*&^%$# ex-Nazi right after seeing her friend be viciously murdered... Bitch!

13. Darwin... Just like the character Morph in the 90's X-Men Cartoon, we have our token "Dead Dude" as my college Hero & Quest teacher would say, whose only purpose is to die to advance the other characters with grief. But we really don't get to know Darwin, therefore it's okay because the audience doesn't care about him, and hey, while we're at it let's revert back to classic horror movie cliches and make him that black guy that always dies!


Yeah we forget Darwin pretty fast. His death was the biggest CG showcase of his powers his character got, that's how much we care about Darwin.

And nobody says a g*&^%$# thing about him during the final battle. Like, Havoc could have said "You let our friend get killed viciously by a nazi you bug-winged whore!" before he clipped her wings with his lazers over the ocean. But no. Sigh.

14. Beast... When we are introduced to Beast being a mutant, it turns out he's been working for a technological division in the CIA unknown as a mutant, know why?


Because he's been wearing shoes. Yes, that's why.


He takes off his shoes to reveal freakish beast feet. Yet all the way through the movie he pisses and moans about not fitting in and being a freak.

Okay, but you can wear shoes, you asshole.

The comic Beast was ape-like all around. He was a big hulking guy with large hands and feet who even ran and walked around with an ape-like hunch. This Beast had weird feet. Put on some g*&^%$# shoes and the f&#! over yourself.

Also, his blue makeup and fur looked stupid as all get out. The 1941 Wolf Man looked more convincing.

15. Beast created Cerebrum In the first two movies it's said that Magneto helped build cerebrum with Xavior.


So, yeah, this prequel does a great job of showing the kind of friendship and technological prowess of Charles and Erik by having Beast build Cerebro in a jiff in 1963 for him. Not congruent with other films.

16. Sebastian Shaw had to bully every military power into pointing nuclear missles at each other to create the missle crisis So we've officially discredited all conflict in history. Nevermind, it was a mutant Bond villain.


My point? From the trailers, it looked as though the origin story was going to put the X-Men to the test by using their powers to intervene in the real missle crisis. Not discredit the entire Cold War American/Russian tension by having Kevin Bacon have everyone try to nuke themselves, which leads to my next point:

17. Nuke the world so that mutants can evolve past humans Yeah, that makes sense you f#%@#&! moron, because nuclear weapons don't discriminate against the genetically mutated.


Sure, he's a villian, he's evil, and probably crazy, so if that is a good enough excuse to you then so be it. But this guy had followers, and at no point did anyone in the film ever stop to say how stupid that idea was. Jesus, how over the top can you get? And the scene where they explain this theory through a toybox-level CGI landscape is just corny, poorly timed, and lacks impact or any eerie subltey. How much more disturbing would it have been had they played this voiceover to a practical set, showing suffering fallout victims? Even on a very small scale that would have been far more effective.

18. Characters in this movie make huge decisions at the drop of a f#%@#&! dime Characters switch teams with such litte consideration as to what they are doing and don't seem to give a s$#! about any of the consequential variables. Like I said before, Angel joins The Hellfire Club (Which is really the orignal Brotherhood of Mutants in this film.) even though she's just seen how viciously murderous they all are; stabbing people with swords and dropping them out of the sky in droves. She knows Sebastion is an ex-Nazi, and she sees him murder Darwin right in front of her, yet she joins their team in a heartbeat.

The same s$#! happens at the very end with Mystique swtiching sides even though she has such little reasoning to do so and, if anything, has just witnessed more evidence that she should stick with her loyal loving step brother Charles who has not done one thing to warrant the loss of her allegience. Instead she leaves him lying on a beach, shot and paralyzed to join the remnants of The Hellfire Club (remember, these are the vicious murdering mutants who sided with the Nazi who wanted to blow up the earth) and Magneto. Just a load of s$#!.

19. When Beast turns blue and fuzzy, nobody really gives a s$#! What's that you've done? Inject yourself with a serum concocted from Mystique's blood to make a cure for looking wierd, but it doesn't effect your powers....??? Wait, if your power is having weird feet, then doesn't that seem kind of impossible? Anyway, are you alright? Are you in pain? Could this kill you? Jesus christ what have you done? You blue freak! Anything in the way of giving a s$#!...

Nothing. Just "You've never looked better." "I think I have a new name for you, Beast." Okay, on to the next scene! Because this is good film making! Fucknuts.

20. Proffessor X never had the Jedi mind trick Knowing Marvel comics I'm sure that they've f&%$#& with his powers all over the place. But the Charles Xavier I know never just put his fingers on his temple and yelled "Sleep!"


21. Emma Frost's diamond skin looked stupid, and poorly CGIed Maybe there's not much to do there in the first place, but s$#! it looked dumb.

22. Why was Mystique cuddling up to Magneto when, if this movie was trying to go with continuity, she should have been getting ready to f&#! Azazel? If there's one thing the original movies failed to do it's show the sexual relationship between Mystique and Magneto, which I never picked up on in the first place. Partly because Ian McKellan's Magneto just seemed so... Well I would say homosexual, but I wouldn't mean it in a bad way. He just seemed preoccupied with other things.

But Bryan Singer did say in the X2 commentary that Mystique and Magneto had a sexual relationship. So okay, we want to see that being setup I guess, since this new movie is a prequel to the first two. But then we have Azazel, who is a scary red Satan-looking, sword-weilding, evil, mercillessly-murderous insane-nazi-following bastard. Yet, he's also the father of Nightcrawler! And guess whose da mamma? You guessed it, Mystique.

f&#! the what? This is just weird, because honestly, aside from Bryan Singer's commentary in which he states that "Mystique appeals to Magneto in some form, we just don't know what," I would never have known they had a sexual relationship, and I sincerely doubt most people would have gathered that either. So why bother with it? It's the one thing this movie could have changed without anyone knowing or caring, but they made a big deal out of it anyway.

23. Erik and Charles have little time to form a legendary friendship that turned to rivalry, therefore overall failing in the entire purpose of this film to begin with Okay so the movie is supposed to show Charles and Erik when they were buddies in the 60's, right? Well we rush through that pretty fast. The course of this movie takes maybe a few months at most, and these characters are just kind of thrown together. Then they separate into their own factions. Nothing shows me that they know each other that well at all. That's it? Okay then...

24. This film falls victim to the obligitory, yet relentlessly irritating and insulting to the audience "name game" "I want to be called Mystique." "Your a proffessor and your last name's Xavior, let's call you Proffessor X!" "He always wreaks havoc, let's call him Havoc!" "I adapt to things, people call me Darwin." "You're blue and hairy and monster-like, cool, Ima call you Beast." "The only thing that wails like Sean is a Banshee." "You should be called Magneto!" "It amplifiies your mental waves, I call it Cerebro." "You're not G-men... you're... X-Men!"

All of these are based on lines very similar, if not exactly, what were said in the movie. And I f#%@#&! GET IT! We know who they are, we came to see the movie, didn't we? I don't need you to spell it out for me. Godamnit.

25. Sebastian Shaw charges up an assload of nuclear energy, but there is no climactic showdown, he just gets a coin driven through his head by Magneto... Nuff said.

26. Magneto's abilities were exaggeratted as well For some majestic reason, Magneto occassionally flies. He does so in the comics and in the cartoons and once or twice in the previous films. It always irked me, but I assumed it had something to do with metal on him because in X2 he requires a flat metal plate to stand on in order to glide over a pit. Here, not only does he inexplicably fly, but he lifts other people and throws them with his powers. They aren't made of metal. Stupid. Unless I didn't notice, and he was using metal on their clothing to move them. If such is the case I will revoke this criticism.

27. Sebastian Shaw had Magneto's telepathy blocking helmet to begin with, once again negating any concept of Erik and Charles's ingenuity It was always implied to me that Erik built the hemlet to block out Cerebro/Charles, because he helped Charles build Cerebro in the first place.


28. That stupid shot where everyone's peering off the edge of the window to watch Havoc... What is this s$#!? Scooby Doo?

29. Decide whether it's going to be a reboot or prequel, don't halfass a lot of both and leave it up to the audience to make sense of the mess. By setting up a prequel to the original films you have alerted the fans of the REAL X-Men movies, therefore when you create all these inconsistencies with the original real X-Men movies expecting fans not to notice your lazy f&#! ups you have insulted the intelligence of your audience. f&#! you, movie. Nuff said.

30. Magneto loses his moral compass, whether it was twisted to begin with or not, by basically confirming all the evil intentions his enemy ever had as righteous

Yes. I mean it. Obviously Erik was tainted apple from the git go, and rightfully so, those nazi bastards deserve every bit of Magneto vengeance they had coming. So naturally we're all waiting to see what he has in store for the evil motherf@#$%! who shot his mom in fornt of him, and according to a quick flash edit, he was tortured and experimented on by as well. So we waited all through this film to see what Erik was going to do with Sebastian Shaw once he gets his magnetic grips on him. All the way through this film, I just kept thinking about that first scene where Shaw kills Erik's mom right next to that torture room. I just kept thinking "THIS GUY IS A NAZI FOR GOD'S SAKE!" Personally, I didn't want Erik to learn anything from Charles, or show mercy. I wanted him to torture and mutilate Kevin Bacon to death. I knew I probably wouldn't get that, and that's most likely not what film makers and audiences everywhere would want. But what I got was worse.

What does he do when he finally does get to Sebastian Shaw? He takes the helmet from his head and puts it on his own (obviously) has him in a position where Shaw is frozen, then looks him in the eye and says "If you can hear me, I want you to know I think you're right, we are the future, but unfortunately you killed my mother," then sends a coin through his head.

...Seriously? The character probably died happy, then. His monster just took his place. He didn't even at least say: "And you slaughtered my people, and tortured me, you nazi pig, go to hell." He just said, "But unfortunately, you killed my mother." The word "unfortunately" even implies that if he hadn't killed his mother he wouldn't want to kill him. How f&%$#& up is that? And after this point in the film, Magneto expresses hatred for all humans anyway, so why should he even care about his mother if he's taking that approach?

I understand the irony in Magneto becoming a genocidal supervillain when his origins were in the holocaust, and in the other films he does completely want to wipe out humans. But here it just doesn't work. It's sick and twisted that he would confirm this evil son of a bitch's intentions as righteous. And then gives us a very anticlimactic murder scene.

In addition, he also took over leading Shaw's minions, when earlier he was content to try and strangle Emma Frost to death. I think he should have slaughtered the entire Hellfire club just for following a nazi around. Especially Azazel. But no, he just fills Sebastian's nazi shoes.

Conclusion...

I wrote this so that I can get all my criticism out of my system. When people ask me why I don't like the film, I feel exhausted already because I have so many answers, and honestly I'm confident there are even more reasons than the ones I just discussed. But at least now I can refer them to this note and feel theraputic for getting it out of my system.

Everyone's welcome to disagree with me as much as they want, but I'm sticking with my guns on this. This is how I feel about the film and the decision's it made.

At the end of the day, it's just a bad movie altogether and it isn't exactly worth this much critique, but X-Men had a huge impact on me, and it really shaped who I am. It made me start reading comics. Those first two films are extrodinarily close to me. And even though I gave up the comics because they were too convoluded, and most likely have jumbled up continuity in every way shape or form, I still am always going to be an X-Men fanboy at heart. The fact that the film doesn't follow through on comic book loyalty isn't that big of a deal to me though. But it's not fair to treat a beloved franchise like this, after two of the biggest blows I've ever seen in sequel/prequel history. It's the equivalent to watching someone beat a dead prized steed mercilessly over and over again screaming "Wake up! Do Something!" So this movie gets 1 & 1/2 stars from me. I'd give it two, because it was somewhat entertaining and better than the last two X-Men films, but the blow it took to the first two films, and the silly and outright poor decisions it made get half a star taken away. Overall I just disapproved.


And who am I kidding? I hate this f#%@#&! movie. The more I think about it the more I just get angry. And I'm tired of one specific person telling me I only disliked this film because I had subconscious expectations and my loyalty to the old films won't let me see past them. Not f#%@#&! true at all. This was just a bad film, and much like Iron Man 2, I'm just shocked by how anyone could really think it's a good movie. I was soft on it for a while, my original rating was 2 & 1/2 stars because going out of it the theater I thought "C-" but that's too good. Just because something is at times nice to look at and has cool people in it, does not make it consist of quality. And this is no exception.


Positives...

1. Michael Fassbender... just, Michael Fassbender

2. Jennifer Lawrence... dear god, Jennifer Lawrence.

3. The scene where Erik's mother is killed in front of him, it's pretty powerful, even with Kevin Bacon

4. Hugh Jackman/Wolverine's cameo

5. Loyalty to the original costumes (and a well pulled off effort I must say)

6. It is better than X-Men 3: The Last Stand and X-Men Origins: Wolverine

Now f&#! this movie, and go see Super 8!!!
Posted by snmshow at 2:43 AM
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X-Men Reviews 7 Empty Re: X-Men Reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 08, 2011 11:58 pm

http://www.mistryofhabs.com/2011/06/29/first-class-is-first-class-2/

First Class is First Class
by realrelio7 on Jun 29, 2011 • 12:01 AM No Comments

X-MEN FIRST CLASS REVIEW

X-Men: First Class takes us to the beginning of the X-Men saga, set in the cold war era, this explosive yet empathetic adventure with breathtaking special effects focuses on the origins of Professor X and Magneto, a fascinating insight into the development and demise of their friendship. We see in the early stages of the movie Xavier as a young man, absent from a wheelchair and with a full set of hair, filled with confidence we witness him trying to pick up girls in a bar, displaying a different side that we perhaps never imagined before. As Professor X and Magneto start off as allies on a mission to save the world from nuclear chaos, we wtiness the conflicts that erupts between the two, as their friendship sours and takes the shape of the formidable rivals we now know them as.

Credit is due to the story development and direction from director Matthew Vaughn and writer Bryan Singer, this complemented by the performances from James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender as Charles Xavier and Magneto seamlessly gives the movie its own identify from previous X-Men movies.

Villain Sebastian Shaw played by Kevin Bacon portrays a somewhat humorous villain but turns out to have very similar objectives to Magneto, and it is these evil intentions that intertwines with the character of Mystique, who we see as Charles Xavier’s best friend. However just like Magneto we see aspects of her dark side seeping through as the plot thickens.

First Class makes a considerable effort to stay loyal to the true comic book characteristics, although some fans may be disappointed from the lack of character development for some of the new roles, the visual aspects and worthy appearances of these new heroes goes some way to cover these small cracks, and considering the primary focus of the movie is on Charles Xavier and Magneto these floors can be forgiven.

Verdict: An impressive addition to the X-Men series, excellent colbaration of lead chracters backed up by attractive visuals. First Class does not need the previous movies to hold its weight, it does this all on its own merit and is no doubt capable of spearing a new franchise collection of movies.

See it – For Rel-io
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