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Jane Eyre reviews 7

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Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 11, 2011 2:27 am

http://www.empireonline.com/reviews/reviewcomplete.asp?FID=137341

Jane Eyre
Plot
A new interpretation of Charlotte Brontë’s classic romance about a self-assured governess (Wasikowska) who falls in love with her new employer, Mr. Rochester (Fassbender) — a man burdened by a terrible secret.

Review
And so anotherr spin about the Brontëan moors: windswept, rain-sodden, winter-chilled. While not intent upon a reboot, Sin Nombre’s Cary Fukunaga certainly aims for a primal climate, shooting Victorian Yorkshire like a nuclear wasteland — the opening scene discovers Mia Wasikowska’s distraught Jane stumbling across what appears to be the outskirts of Mordor. The interiors are, if anything, gloomier. The abiding sensation is one of dampness, a visceral demonstration of what it is to live without central heating. This is Brontë recalibrated by Sergio Leone — meandering chit-chat is out, smouldering glances and lunar landscapes are in. It could double as a horror movie.

As plain, thinky Jane, Wasikowska matches her director’s sullen vibe with impressive restraint. She has that rare knack for slipping out of her good looks for something sterner, inward — a kernel of displeasure at a patriarchal world. How well she embodies Brontë’s proto-feminist ideal: fierce and unflappable, hair pinned tight as a skull cap, mouth pursed equally furiously when supping tea or clambering through the wild. A woman trying to fill mind and soul, to exercise her freedom to choose, trading dialogue with stuck-in-the-mud yokels like Judi Dench (the homespun housekeeper), Jamie Bell (the clergyman whose love is spurned) and Sally Hawkins (the hideously priggish aunt). If the movie had stopped at constructing an emotional treatment for Jane through a modern prism, it would have been a minor triumph.

Opposite stews Michael Fassbender: smile askew, eyes aflame, hair afopping, and tunic Byronically agape. Few of today’s leading men possess the carnal charisma of this Irish Method rogue. There is something untamed about him, as if he might rip off his breeches and howl at the moon — making him a peculiar choice as Rochester. If you stuck to the book’s fustier vision, you’d cast Paul Giamatti. But this being the movies, why not pep up your Rochester with a hefty dose of Heathcliff? Simple: it cheapens Jane’s attraction to cliché — our heroine developing a crush on the handsome grump fetchingly lit by crackling firelight. For all the depth of the visual palate, the romance is starkly black and white.

Strange, too, if playing Rochester as rock star, that the script gives so little emphasis to the book’s darker mysteries. The midnight screams, the secret room, the skeleton in Rochester’s closet — the fun bits — feel like an afterthought. Their discovery holds no impact, no tragedy. The film sets a forceful Jane up against an unforgiving universe then turns its nose up at going full Brontë.

Verdict
There’s no question it’s stunningly mounted, and Wasikowska makes a much stronger Jane than Alice, but the romance is overripe and the climax underdone.

Reviewer: Ian Nathan

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:23 pm

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/270451/Jane-Eyre-film-review

JANE EYRE FILM REVIEW
Bronte Parsonage Museum
 (The Bronte Society)

Sunday September 11,2011
By Sunday Express Reporter

It’s a beautifully bright and sunny day in Haworth. The village’s smart Georgian parsonage wouldn’t look out of place on the cover of Period Living magazine and its perfectly manicured, colourful garden is in full bloom. All in all, the former home of the Brontë family paints an idyllic picture and it’s an image at odds with their legend, one associated with tragedy, isolation and an otherworldly creativity.

The day I visit, the people of Haworth will enjoy an advance screening of the new big-screen version of Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska as a not-so-plain Jane and Michael Fassbender as her brooding employer, Mr Rochester. To celebrate the film’s release, the Sunday Express was given exclusive access to the archives of the family’s former home, now the Brontë Parsonage Museum.

Library and collections officer Sarah Laycock has raided the archives for a selection of treasured artefacts off limits to the public, displayed in plastic folders on tissue-covered lecterns and handled by Sarah wearing surgical gloves. Only about two per cent of the collection is on display at any one time.

The Brontë legend grew up in the wake of Charlotte’s 1847 classic novel Jane Eyre; Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights was published in the same year as was their sister Anne’s Agnes Grey. The novels of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell, their male alter egos, represented an unprecedented outpouring of talent from one household.

The sad story of the Brontës’ short lives holds almost as much eerie power as their literary success. Their mother died aged 38 leaving their father Patrick, a curate, to raise five children. Their eldest sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, died of tuberculosis aged 11 and 10.

Branwell, their alcoholic brother, died of tuberculosis aged 31. Emily died in the same year, 1848, of the same disease, Anne following suit six months later. Charlotte lived long enough to marry Arthur Bell Nichols, only to die of what are now believed to have been pregnancy complications, aged 38.

The most moving piece of memorabilia in the Parsonage collection is the only known letter in which Charlotte refers to the fact that her siblings died in such close succession, written on black-bordered mourning stationery to her friend Letitia Wheelwright. The Brontë Society paid £70,000 for the letter when it came up for auction, its tiny, faded script barely decipherable.

“On the 24th September my only brother, after being long in weak health and latterly consumptive, though we were far from apprehending immediate danger, died quite suddenly as it seemed to us. He had been out two days before. The shock was great.

“Ere he could be interred I fell ill. Although nervous fever fell me very weak, as I was slowly recovering my sister Emily whom you knew, was seized with inflammation of the lungs. Two agonising months… followed and on the 19th December she died.

“She was scarcely cold in her grave when Anne my youngest and last sister who had been delicate all her life exhibited symptoms that struck us with acute alarm. We sent for the first advice that could be procured and she was examined with a stethoscope and the dreadful fact was announced that... tubercular consumption had already made considerable progress.” Anne died within six months of Emily.

Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte’s biographer, heard a poignant story from the Brontës’ servant, Tabby, who explained that Charlotte, Emily, Anne and Branwell would all walk around the dining room table, sharing and discussing their writing and ideas. After they had died, the saddest sound was that of Charlotte doing a solitary circuit around the table.

We are also shown two of the miniscule books, about 1.5ins long, that Charlotte and Branwell made out of sugar bags or wallpaper fragments and hand-bound themselves. Unless you were among the collection of toy soldiers for whom the stories were intended, you would need a magnifying glass to decipher the minute script. Their size serves a dual purpose. “Sometimes the content was a little bit inappropriate, quite gruesome, like children being hanged. They didn’t want their father to be able to read it!”

Charlotte’s talent for drawing and painting is also relatively unknown but evident on a pencil drawing of Bolton Abbey, which was even exhibited in a Leeds art gallery, and a watercolour, Wild Roses From Nature.

A letter written to her best friend Ellen Nussey in 1843 shows a small caricature of them both in which Charlotte portrays herself as an ugly dwarf character.

“She hated people looking at her and she thought she was very ugly,” says Susan Newby, telling the story of how Charlotte was eager to look as smart as possible on a trip to London. “She didn’t know what to do with her hair so she got a friend to buy her a hairpiece but apparently it wasn’t the right colour. In London, she was asked: ‘Where did you get your funny hat?'”

Our tour finished, it’s over to Haworth’s Baptist Church where we squeeze on to the bottom-numbing pews for the film’s local premiere. There have, to date, been 17 big-screen interpretations of Jane Eyre, not to mention the 12 TV adaptations. What made director Cary Fukunaga, also in Haworth for the screening, decide there was room for another one?

“For me, the story is unique,” he says. “Not only is the heroine a very strong woman who makes her own decisions but the early Gothic literature brings in darker elements that were so different from, say, Jane Austen 20 years earlier.” That Gothic element is one he brings to the fore in his version of the film.

Fukunaga’s great coup was persuading Oscar-winning actress Judi Dench to take the part of Rochester’s housekeeper Mrs Fairfax after writing her “a sweet letter telling her how big a fan I was. She said she’d do it which was pretty awesome. On set, she had the energy of someone making their first film”.

Dench has joked that she read Jane Eyre “when Charlotte Brontë had just written it. This story has been done many times but I felt that Cary had quite different, dark ideas about it”.

Right now, the Brontë sisters are, as they say, having a moment. Also imminent is Andrea Arnold’s version of Wuthering Heights while Blake Morrison has adapted a Chekhov play into a Brontë story, We Are Three Sisters.

Fukunaga’s wonderfully atmospheric film is already widely tipped as an Oscar contender. Even if, as its makers hope, this version of Jane Eyre becomes the definitive version, when it comes to a story this potent, it certainly won’t be the last.

Jane Eyre is in cinemas now. Read Henry Fitzherbert’s review on page 56.

Details of the Bronte Parsonage Museum at www.bronte.info; 01535 642 323.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:54 pm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/sep/11/jane-eyre-philip-french-review

Jane Eyre – review

A good-looking, serious and well-acted version of the Brontë classic, but it still can't match a moody Orson Welles

Philip French
The Observer, Sunday 11 September 2011
Article history

Jane Eyre
Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska as Rochester and Jane Eyre in the new film version. Photograph: Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar

Films of Brontë novels have been arriving in pairs at regular intervals these past 70 years, as if a production of Emily's Wuthering Heights demanded an accompanying production of Charlotte's Jane Eyre. The versions, however, that set the bar for this year's pictures are not those made in England in the 1970s and the 1990s but those produced when the Hollywood studio system was at its zenith. Shot in stylish and stylised fashion on Californian sound stages, they largely featured members of the local British colony and took a fairly cavalier attitude to the texts. I refer of course to William Wyler's Wuthering Heights starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon as Heathcliff and Cathy, which opened in 1939, and Robert Stevenson's foggy, gothic Jane Eyre, which appeared after a lengthy period of gestation in 1943, with Joan Fontaine as a beautiful, rather refined Jane, and Orson Welles as a wild, charismatic Rochester. The latter was adapted by Aldous Huxley from an hour-length radio script written in the 1930s by John Houseman for the Mercury Theatre of the Air, in which Welles appeared. This Brontë celebration was accompanied by Hitchcock's classic treatment of Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier's homage to Jane Eyre, starring Joan Fontaine as an unnamed narrator, and we tend to conflate her two performances in our mind. There was also at that time Jacques Tourneur's remarkable horror film I Walked With a Zombie (1943), a transposition of Jane Eyre to the modern Caribbean where the Rochester character's mad wife becomes a victim of voodoo. It stands in relation to the original the way Amy Heckerling's Beverly Hills comedy Clueless does to Jane Austen's Emma. I intend that as a compliment.

Jane Eyre
Production year: 2011
Countries: Rest of the world, UK
Cert (UK): PG
Runtime: 121 mins
Directors: Cary Fukunaga, Cary Joji Fukunaga
Cast: Amelia Clarkson, Craig Roberts, Dame Judi Dench, Holliday Grainger, Imogen Poots, Jamie Bell, Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Sally Hawkins, Su Elliot, Tamzin Merchant
More on this film

Will Andrea Arnold's Wuthering Heights (her third feature after the realistic contemporary dramas Red Road and Fish Tank) and Cary Joji Fukunaga's Jane Eyre (his second movie after his impressive debut with Sin Nombre, a harrowing account of the experiences of Hispanic emigrants heading for the States) take their place alongside Wyler and Stevenson's monochrome classics of seven decades ago? Time will tell. Arnold's picture opens here in November, and reports from its premiere in Venice this week suggest that the casting of a black actor as Heathcliff is the least of the innovations and shocks that are in store. Fukunaga's Jane Eyre is an altogether more respectful affair, but it is in all aspects superior to the previous adaptations, starring Susannah York and Charlotte Gainsbourg as Jane and George C Scott and William Hurt as Rochester.
Watch the trailer for Cary Fukunaga's adaptation of Jane Eyre Link to this video

The novel is adapted by the playwright Moira Buffini (whose previous film, the immensely enjoyable Tamara Drewe, was a parodic modern treatment of Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd), and she has taken the bold decision to have Jane (Mia Wasikowska) begin the narrative of her life from her late teens. The film starts three-quarters of the way through the novel when she seeks refuge at the remote home of the kindly vicar St John Rivers (Jamie Bell). We first see her stranded at a crossroads on a moor, disoriented and penniless, at the point where – as those acquainted with the book will know – she has fled from the enchantments of Thornfield Hall, her rewarding job as governess to the little Adele and her love for the rich Byronic Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender), who has led her to the altar under false pretences. This reorganisation of the book makes a great deal of sense as it brings out one of the novel's great themes: the way the orphaned Jane is searching for a home, and the defining of what that home might be for her, an intelligent, independent-minded Christian woman fuelled by ideas of romantic love, sexual fulfilment and equality within the constraints imposed on her by 19th-century society. In flashback we see Jane at the age of nine in open rebellion at Gateshead, the grand house where she's bullied and rejected by her insensitive aunt, Mrs Reed, and her family. She's next sent to Lowood, the chilly charity school run by the hypocritical cleric Mr Brocklehurst, where she gradually comes to learn the meaning of forbearance, tolerance and Christian charity. Later, as governess at Thornfield, we see her grow intellectually and blossom emotionally in that magical, sinister place. The film brings out well the contrast between the dark gothic secrets concealed in the attic by the troubled, libertine Rochester, and the kindly, blinkered domestic world of the housekeeper Miss Fairfax (Judi Dench), oblivious to the horrors and dangers around her.

During her lengthy sojourn at the Rivers's, Jane discovers that a simple place to sleep above the country schoolroom she commands can be a satisfying home. But she also eventually recognises that a marriage to the zealous godly Rivers as his missionary partner in India might be sensible as a vocation though unsatisfactory as a truly fulfilling romantic relationship. Of course she's rescued from dependency by two old fictional devices, the fortuitous inheritance and the fortunate accident, leading to the reconciliation with Rochester when he is redeemed by penitence, pain and affliction bravely borne. The end is somewhat perfunctory, with the "Reader I married him" dropped as well as the review of the following decade of marriage and her final reflections on St John Rivers and his holy mission. The Christian themes are not ignored but neither are they properly dramatised.

This Jane Eyre is a good-looking film, serious, thought through and well acted. Yet it ends up rather shallow, lacking the cinematic intensity of the Orson Welles version, though that was widely patronised and sneered at in its day. Some would argue that only a five-hour TV mini-series could do justice to the tone, detail and character development of Brontë's triple-decker Victorian novel, and I think they're probably right.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sat Sep 17, 2011 10:50 pm

http://www.birminghammail.net/what-is-on-in-birmingham/2011/09/16/film-review-jane-eyre-pg-97319-29431015/

FILM REVIEW: Jane Eyre (PG) ***

by Graham Young, Birmingham Mail
Sep 16 2011

MUCH has been made of the pressure Gary Oldman must have felt following Sir Alec Guinness in the remake of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.

But come on. Oldman is one of Britain’s finest, proven actors with nothing to lose.

On the other hand, rising German-Irish star Michael Fassbender comes to Charlotte Brontë’s novel after a score of previous screen interpretations.

Actors who have preceded him as Thornfield Hall master Edward Rochester include top stars like William Hurt (in Franco Zeffirelli’s 1996 version), Timothy Dalton (TV, 1983), George C Scott (TV, 1970, shortly before rejecting his best actor Oscar win for Patton the following year), Charlton Heston (TV, 1949) and Orson Welles (1943).

So no pressure there, then, for Fassbender. Or even little known Californian Cary Fukunaga directing him.

Having made the excellent Honduran world cinema movie Sin Nombre two years ago, Cary fearlessly plunges himself into the deep end with a relatively faithful bonnet bonanza shot on location in beautiful Derbyshire.

Australian-born Mia Wasikowska gives Jane enough mettle to want to determine her own future in the right way.

The cast is rounded out with Jamie Bell as St John Rivers, who would also like Jane’s hand, and Sally Hawkins as Jane’s abusive aunt Mrs Reed.

Judi Dench is deliciously subtle as housekeeper Mrs Fairfax, who wishes she could have been of more help to Jane.

If anything, Fukunaga seems to be almost too in awe of the book since a few more cinematic flourishes would not have gone amiss.

But this is still a welcome change from Horrible Bosses etc which will have been long forgotten in 164 years’ time.

In an age of instant gratification, lessons about the value of solitude for long term benefit still ring true.

Verdict: Three stars
GRAHAM YOUNG

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 18, 2011 11:50 pm

http://www.sundayworld.com/entertainment/index.php?aid=8744

It's a life of pain for Jane

JANE EYRE (12A) starstarstarstar

THE STORY: Upon turning 18 and completing her education, Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska) finds work as a governess for Adle Varens (Romy Settbon Moore), the ward of Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender), master of Thornfield Hall.

THE STARS: Sally Hawkins, Amelia Clarkson, Mia Wasikowska, Romy Settbon Moore, Michael Fassbender, Dame Judi Dench

FIERY PASSION: Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska

FIERY PASSION: Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska
JANE EYRE (Wasikowska) who has left a troubled past behind and has accepted a job as a governess at the beautiful Thornfield Hall.

The film begins with 10-year old Jane Eyre (Amelia Clarkson) an orphan who has been cast out of her childhood home Gateshead by her detestable guardian Aunt Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins) and into a Christian charity school.

Jane makes one classmate friend in the rigid dogmatic Loman School, Helen (Freya Parks), but her gritty friend dies of consumption.

As a teenager she leaves the school and is sent to Thornfield Hall to become a governess to a young French girl who has been assigned to the master of the house Edward Rochester (Fassbender).

There is an instant connection between Edward and Jane but both are unsure about how to deal with the situation.

However Edward - who has a dark secret - is much clearer with his desires and has become entranced by Jane's simple beauty and honesty.

Unfortunately, he can't find a way through to her well-guarded heart.

THE VERDICT:

This film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's book Jane Eyre draws you into the solitary world of the young governess. With its striking set decoration and costumes, director Cary Fukunaga has crafted a worthy adaptation of the novel.

Those with a fondness for period piece romances and for the book itself will enjoy this. With strong leads, gloomy atmosphere and fantastic script, this film is well worth a trip to the cinema.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:02 am

http://mythoughtsandotherrubbish.wordpress.com/2011/09/18/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

I went and saw Jane Eyre last week, with Michael Fassbender and Mia Wassisomething (OK, I’ll stop being lazy, I’ll look it up – Wasikowska – well that’s not easy to spell from memory). I didn’t actually see it with them, they were in it. It was good in a lot of ways; beautifully shot, good acting blah blah blah, but somehow, it left me feeling vaguely unsatisfied. It ended too quickly and easily for my liking.

Warning: the following contains spoilers unless you’ve read the book in which case none of this will be a surprise.

Jane’s all broken hearted after Rochester tried to commit bigamy with her and almost dies in a desperate attempt to escape him. She gives it a year whereby she manages to survive and get a job in a village school as a teacher, has a bit of a non-romance with Jamie Bell’s character, St John, (although from the way the cast say his name I thought it was Sinjin) and then one day hears Rochester’s voice calling her across the moors. She says adios to Jamie Bell’s character whose a bit annoyed because he thought he was in with a chance, and Jane goes back to find Rochester. He’s now blind but she forgives him for what he did and they presumably live happily ever after although you don’t really get to see that bit because that’s where the film ends.

To me, it just feels like the ending was too abrupt and swift considering all the torment she went through. It was almost like, Jane Eyre has done her independent woman bit in a Destiny-Child-19th-century-style-type-way and Mrs Rochester is dead so we can be happy now. Well as much as one can after being blind and losing one’s hand (Rochester not Jane), although they didn’t include the latter part in the film.

I’m not sure what could have made it better. They’d both suffered enough so you think I’d be pleased they got back together, it just felt a bit rushed like the director realized he had used 2 hours portraying how awful her life was and “Oh gosh is that the time? Well I’ve got 2 minutes left to give Jane (and the audience) the happy after she’s been waiting for.”

Another slight irritant with the film is that whilst I think Michael Fassbander is a handsome chap and played Rochester with the required magnetism and charasima required, I thought he seemed a bit of a d-ck at times. Like when he was mocking Jane. I think he was supposed to come across as being sardonic and cynical, but Jane had zero tolerance for it (good woman) and in her own way let him know he was being an arse. Of course he’d fall in love with Jane, how could he not? I just wish I could have fallen a bit in love with him, like I did with the book, but sadly that wasn’t too be the case with Fass’s version of him. (That’s what I’m calling Michael Fassbender from now on, I’m sure he won’t mind)

I hope none of the above puts you off if you were considering going to see the film. No doubt there are people out there who love it. And whilst I liked it, sadly I can’t say that I loved it.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:03 am

http://www.chokingonpopcorn.com/popcorn/2011/09/jane-eyre-2011/

Jane Eyre (2011)
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Reviews

— Helen on September 18th, 2011 08:09:41 pm

Of all the Bronte Sisters novels, Jane Eyre is the one that has been adapted to film and television the most times. I think its popularity is due to the fact that although it is set in the 1840s and contains tragic elements, as well as comments about society’s class divisons; it is at heart a compelling love story and a good romance tale will always attract audiences.

Of the countless adaptations there have been, the one that sticks out for me is the BBC’s recent stunning TV version of Jane Eyre, which I reviewed only last year. Having given the BBC’s adaptation a five star rating, it was inevitable that I was going to make comparisons between that and this new adaptation. Whereas the BBC version had about four hours to make use of the novel material, this film had to condense the story into about ninety minutes, so it was never going to able to show as much. As expected, I found myself constantly finding fault with the new film because it didn’t deal with elements of the plot as well as the other adaptation had done.

Instead of going straight into criticisms though, i’ll start with the few positives of this Jane Eyre adaptation. If you don’t know the story, Jane Eyre is a plain looking girl who has never experienced much kindness, but is stong willed and knows her own mind. When she takes up the post of governess at Thornfield Hall, she finds herself a subject of interest to the master of the house, Mr Rochester. He unexpectedly sees an equal in her to himself, though they are of different classes and he finds she challenges him and his beliefs. Mia Wasikowska does portray Jane accurately, even on the aesthetic level. The make-up team did a good job of making the pretty actress appear plain and ordinary in order to make a more convincing Jane. Michael Fassbender is also rightly cast as Mr Rochester, successfully capturing the character’s dark humour and wit. Looks wise, he’s definitely rugged enough to draw in female viewers. I heard one fellow cinemagoer say “he’s so hot he set the bed on fire”, referring to a particular scene.

What’s lacking in the film is the chemistry between the two actors. The passion between Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester is just not convincing, and that for me is essential to my enjoyment of the story. You have to understand how strong the link between the characters is in order to grasp and understand the agony they both go through when they are torn apart from each other by circumstances. The lack of chemistry between Fassbender and Wasikowsa made the central relationship seem farcical and unreal in places where it should have been powerfully moving. This was not helped by the screenplay either. During vital scenes, the screenwriter seems to have taken great liberties with original novel’s material and added entirely new dialogue to make the lines sound cheesy and less authentic. I found myself rolling my eyes at some of the lines, which is never a good sign.

This Jane Eyre is a credible effort but it’s not even close to being the best adaptation of the novel around. If you’ve never read the novel though and are able to judge the movie entirely on its own merits, then you’re much more likely to enjoy this film. It’s a great love story with tragic elements and dark twists that keep you gripped and stop the story straying into cliché .

Dir: Cary Fukunaga

Starring: Michael Fassbender, Mia Wasikowska, Judi Dench, Jamie Bell

rating: 4

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:37 am

http://popcornandcandy.wordpress.com/2011/09/18/jane-eyre/

Jane Eyre

In a nutshell: Not so plain Jane falls in love with foxy Fassbender

Popcorn rating: 4.5/5

With the new Wuthering Heights adaptation just around the corner (complete with – gasp – a black Heathcliff) it’s timely for a revamp of the fairest Brontë of them all – Charlotte’s Jane Eyre. Cary Fukunaga, who impressed with Sundance winning Mexican gang feature debut Sin Nombre, may seem a strange choice as director for what at first glance (and especially when Judi Dench turns up) looks a super-expensive BBC costume piece – indeed the Beeb also co-produce – but the result is something quite special, to rival even the quintessential Orson Welles/ Jane Fontaine pairing in Robert Stevenson’s 1943 film.

No one does Gothic romance quite like the Brontës and Fukunaga and scriptwriter Moira Buffini (who penned Tamara Drewe) wisely stay true to the source material. Why bother attempting to create brilliant dialogue when Charlotte Brontë got there before you over 160 years ago? The most notable shift however is our introduction, transporting us to the latter quarter of the novel with Jane (Mia Wasikowska) fleeing from Thornfield across the bleak moors, before efficiently returning to childhood and the destiny-shaping position as governess for Mr Rochester’s (Michael Fassbender) ward in flashback.

Famously, Brontë described Rochester as ugly and the narrator herself as plain, but our two leads could never achieve this. Wasikowska is brilliant as a severe Jane, but Michael Fassbender – all Byronic sex appeal, piercing glances and filling out those breeches in a very healthy manner – is absolutely mesmerising. Okay, perving over, but if you caught his turn as Bobby Sands in Hunger, or even his magnetic Magneto in the new X-Men, you’ll know how the German-Irish actor can ignite a screen and the exchanges between Rochester and Jane are sizzling with tension.

Fukunaga also plays up the Gothic elements of the novel for some great suspense – for the four people left in the world who don’t know the reasons behind the strange events at Thornfield, Popcorn won’t spoil the surprise – but the atmosphere and mystery is brilliantly played and Adriano Goldman’s excellent cinematography captures the harsh landscape as an almost alien landscape, far from the rolling English fields of similar adaptations.

While much of the male section of the audience may roll their eyes at the aching romance, this is far from a Brontë-snorus, Jane Eyre is a brilliant adaptation, which is faithful but also brings something new. If you’re a fan of the novel – or my future husband Michael Fassbender – this is a must-see.

Reviewer: AoifeWantonMovieLover

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:38 am

http://www.khoirunisa.com/2011/09/jane-eyre-movie.html

Sunday, September 18, 2011
Jane Eyre movie

i don t know how she does it
Cool, temperate, wrought iron, this new adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre locked in a crinoline tasteful intelligent. Twenty years of Australian origin Mia Wasikowska gives a restrained performance with: Jane turns to his public and his employer with the same crystal clear, even look. Wasikowska makes the cover and references to mid-review and fiercely self-derogatory to his ugliness, which is only a movie star stunning beautiful as possible. North Country accent, however, is much better than Anne Hathaway. But as the stars of Hollywood as to which Britspeak is not the mother tongue, this is achieved with the slow and control.

The plot unfolds in flashback form. Orphan, cruelly treated like a child, beaten and humiliated, Jane endured a boarding school run by Christian fanaticism brutal rich, and possibly pick up Thor as a governess at Hall Field, an isolated house in Yorkshire, the Peak District, teach a little early French, a position that shows Jane is fluent and idiomatic command of the language. But it is not to be the mistress, but the student, such as the master of the house. That's terrible, charismatic and secretly tortured Mr. Rochester, that the creation of extraordinary is an ancestor of Daphne Du Maurier Maxim de Winter and his cousin to Count Dracula.

Michael Fassbender plays in Rochester with a degree, which reflects the strength of professionals Wasikowska is Jane. It simmers and meditate and smile like a crocodile, sometimes sexy, but never does anything as banal as flirting. The warnings are clogging bad mood Fassbender proudly polished presentation Jane, a defense, but also up against terrible confession of affection. Wasikowska shows how Jane is suspicious of his softness and emotion that is released into it. His jokes can be a sincere love, or maybe it's just stroking and petting distracted, give him a much loved horse who is still considering selling or throwing. And when the arrogance Rochester wants to know what his "tale of woe" is - because all governments are - cold Wasikowska shows how stupid, condescending and Jane sees miscalculated this comment. It may be time you get your way, and everything else stems from there.

In a sense, the first meeting with Jane and Rochester, and their next meeting when Jane finally realizes that this is the man, could be the most successful phase of their relationship. Jane is a walk in the woods, a mysterious man on horseback will fall when he installed the courage to see the damage that requires some physical closeness: he has to put her hand around him and helps him return to his horse. Later, in a house in Rochester to be with her and capriciously accuse Jane of his injuries. Fassbender and Wasikowska to make this moment does not meet a cute-but-is responsible for the fatal encounter-important and, indeed, meet-erotic.

This meeting is stimulated exactly right, I think. But I found the management of two other well-known dramatic episodes - the wedding scene, Bertha Mason, and the result - very strong, especially compared to the rest of the film unhurried way of life in rural areas, and Jane is very lonely and frustrated with it. There are some great pictures. Often, the desire for Jane and the passion for the dramatic change in the orchestral score a keening violin Maria Dario Nelli. But, to my eye, marriage, and Bertha in order, however, made a run, especially compared to the melodrama to underscore that the adjustments to these traditional moments.

Fukunaga and writer Moira Buffini have undoubtedly done a great job in this truly elegant Jane Eyre, I can not criticize, but I can not get excited. Others may find the key factor in the memory of the brain that distinguishes the withdrawal from all the other buttons and bows at teatime drama versions of Jane Eyre, and this is definitely a good thing. But I liked to wait Blaze of feeling between Jane and Rochester, and it is not enough in some way has come. Temporal, and the book, and the scene of an emotional storm in the proposal itself: all these are subtle and muted.

Judi Dench convincing support for the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax, Simon McBurney is appalling that the teacher was reliably hostile to Mr. Brocklehurst, and Sally Hawkins is very effective as a heartless, two sides and Jane aunt, Mrs. Reed. All these supporting actors, of course, must distinguish himself has overshadowed the central love story, but interesting, Jamie Bell Jane says proud patron of St John Rivers. His screen presence is far Fassbender mutton chopped the alpha male of Bell St. John is a powerful, if a minor presence in the film. Falling in love in secret, is a sensitive topic and proud of Jane Jane Rochester. This adaptation is a well-balanced, crafted, well acted, but I do not thunder and lightning of passion.

• This article was amended Thursday, September 8. The first condition wrongly said Emily Bronte is the author of Jane Eyre. This has been fixed.


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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 3:16 pm

http://www.film-news.co.uk/show-review.asp?H=Jane-Eyre&nItemID=365

Jane Eyre

added: 22 Sep 2011 // release date: 9 Sep 2011
certificate: PG // director: Cary Fukunaga
studio: BBC Studios // film length 121
reviewer: Amanda Hall-Davis
Jane-Eyre Email this review Printable version
British classic, period drama ‘Jane Eyre’ directed by Cary Fukunaga is delivered with such refined artistry that it brings a true sense of authenticity to the 19th century adaptation.


Eyre struggles as an orphan through her difficult childhood and becomes governess at Thornfield Hall. Against her judgement and position in society she falls in love with her master, the haunted Edward Rochester. Eyre’s strong sense of values does not permit her to continue the strong love she feels when she discovers his secret.

Mia Wasikowska portrays Eyre with a raw intensity, intelligence and innocence which compliments Mr Rochester’s (Michael Fassbender) dark, playful arrogance. Dame Judi Dench plays the motherly housekeeper who commands her scenes with a superb performance.

Cary Fukunaga successfully brings Bronte’s tale to the screen developing Eyre's maturation, whilst capturing the emotions and experiences that accompany her growth to adulthood...beautifully executed

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:09 pm

http://littlebearsinlondon.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/jane-eyre-as-envisioned-by-cary-fukunaga/

Jane Eyre as envisioned by Cary Fukunaga

Last night we (littlebears) went to see Jane Eyre.

So much for delayed gratification (although that is what the film was all about), I am going to just blurt out my opinion right away rather than make you wait until the end of the post: I loved it!

It was spectacular, and moving and gentle but intense and the music, courtesy of one of my absolute favourite composers Dario Marianelli, was perfect. It fitted the film like a well-tailored suit, or, more prosaically, like a good pair of knickers – my point being you should not really notice the music so much; it should not distract, it should compliment the scenes and the mood of the film. If you don’t recognise Mr Marianelli by name, try watching (and listening to) Atonement and Pride & Prejudice which, I think, sample his finest work.

Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender were both brilliant in it. Us little bears both agree than Michael Fassbender is, and most certainly, will be, a force to be reckoned with and are greatly looking forward to A Dangerous Method set for release in February 2012. Wasikowska and Fassbender had a wonderful, and intense, chemistry and that, along with the beautiful cinematography and wonderful score made the film irresistible and eminently watchable.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:18 pm

http://www.radiocinema.it/web/blog/jane-eyre-2

Jane Eyre

22/09/11 - Yet another transposition of the novel by Charlotte Bronte that not even the talent of Michael Fassbender raises uncertainty.

The novels of the Bronte sisters look back in fashion, at least at the cinema: after Wuthering Heights by Emily, seen in Venice, directed by Andrea Arnold, Jane Eyre comes to dining, transposition of the famous novel of his sister Charlotte, over and over again brought the film (the famous '43 version with Orson Welles), this time by the young Cary Joji Fukunaga. But the result, on this occasion, it never takes any consistent direction. The plot is very well known: Jane is mistreated orphan, grew up in a very strict boarding school that, when it comes out, gets a job as governess to Rochester's home grumpy. But the relationship of mistrust between the two soon become a passion unbecoming. Moira Buffini adapts the novel of gothic melodrama and noir, trying to bring a certain spirit of Dickens, but fails to make the film little more than an illustration.

Initially, in fact, the story begins displaying some "modernization" of touch, with flashbacks bold and dry, deadlifts and elliptical style furniture, nervous, dirty, out of focus and played on the machine by hand. But even after twenty minutes, and we do not really understand why, either as a narrative settles down, flatter, traditional and not particularly exciting, both in style, which is becoming closer to the correct transpositions BBC (who produces here), elegant, but also cold. And this indecision and inconsistency off the tremors of the film: the theme of social equality and non-affective emerges, the director loses the ability to have its own peculiar form and the black heart of the story seems entrusted only to photography, among other things a lot beautiful, Adriano Goldman. Not even the players can warm the heart of the viewer, and if Mia Wasikowska gets along with sufficient impetus, Michael Fassbender (after Shame , the actor of the moment) does not make the passion of Rochester as would be required. And off the pathos and obsession of the novel, is a kind of mortal sin against the very idea of ​​romance, and romance.

EMANUELE RAUCH

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:19 pm

http://alasthai.livejournal.com/100615.html

23 September 2011 @ 06:01 am
Brontë 1, Fukunaga 0
Cary Fukunaga's adaptation of Jane Eyre is not a bad one, but it is hardly the novel itself.

All of the best parts of the film are Charlotte Brontë's, the greatest part of Fukunaga's contribution being not screwing it up too badly.

The most significant alteration, the analeptic process in which two thirds of the story is narrated whilst Jane is at the Rivers', is pointless. Brontë structured the novel in a linear fashion for good reason, and it is hard not to suspect that Fukunaga was altering the sequence merely to put his own stamp on it. This is hardly a Peter-Jacksonesque mutilation of the source material, but it is wantonly unnecessary.

The casting is generally good, and one feels particularly sorry for Jamie Bell, who effectively incarnates that most useless of twits, St John Rivers. For his own sake, he had better play something very different very soon. Michael Fassbender makes a very apt Rochester, and Mia Wasikowska a creditable Jane, even if not overendowed with emotion. The only real problem with the casting is Pilot, Rochester's dog, who ought to be "a lion-like creature with long hair and a huge head", not a soppy lap dog. My Beloved also speculated that Fassbender might not be a dog person, since Pilot is absent from a number of scenes wherein he ought to be present, and his appearances generally involve him sitting motionless some distance from Rochester.

The lighting is very good, and Fukunaga does a great job with the candlelight. In fact, the cinematography is generally expert. If only Jane Campion, had studied with Fukunaga, Bright Star might not have been such a travesty.

So why, in a technically-competent film, is St John Rivers made out to be a domineering jerk at home, when he is not so in the novel? Why is the gypsy scene entirely absent? Most importantly of all, why is Jane's internment at Lowood left to appear as if it were positively beneficial to her manners?

At least the film does manage to tell the story of Jane Eyre, and is thus destined to function as an aide-mémoire for literature students over the next few years. That, however, is its likely lifespan, since this is but yet another adaptation of the one, lasting novel.

In short, the film's greatest virtue is as an advertisement for the novel, which will still be around in 200 more years. The film will not, but is at least worth seeing if one has not read the book recently.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:21 pm

http://www.prechlapa.sk/nesmrtelna-romanticka-drama-jana-eyrova-sa-vo-filmovej-podobe-vracia-do-kin/

English romantic drama Jane Eyre returns to cinemas

By Dominic Benusova.

film Jana Eyrova

Jane Eyre, the heroine of the eponymous novel by Charlotte Brontë hit his uneasy fate of many readers and viewers worldwide. After about 24 adaptations of this story, we will be able to see how the director said, "and the darker strašidelnejšiu version. Jane Eyre presented only as a romantic story. I'm sure has many more layers. And I wanted to show those. "This new treatment of classical story proclaiming, through the life story of the main character emancipation, equality and undoubtedly self-esteem can be a valuable inspiration for new generations. Tatrafilm indicate this film in Slovak cinemas 20th October 2011. Bontonfilm, however, was faster in the Czech Republic to play from the 28th July 2011.
Basic information about the film Jane Eyre

Original title: Jane Eyre
Slovak title: Jane Eyre
Czech title: Jane Eyre
Mia Wasikowska ako Jana Eyrová

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre

Country: England / USA
Genre: Romantic Drama
Accessibility: Not for 12 years
Length: 120 min.
First shot: 2011

Directed by Cary Fukunaga
Writer: Moira Buffini (novel by Charlotte Brontë)
Camera: Adriano Goldman
Music: Dario Marianelli
Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Holliday Grainger, Judi Dench, Craig Roberts, Sally Hawkins, Imogen Poots, Sophie Ward, Tamzin Merchant, Jayne Wisener, Simon McBurney, Valentina Cervi

Give the film Jane Eyre

Jane orphaned as a little girl and took her aunt, Mrs. Reed (Sally Hawkins), who treat with her as with a cloth. When she was ten years, blew it out of the house. More steps led Jane to Lowood charity school, where they were not behave much better. But even so, this phase of life had two advantages, smart Jane also received a good education and, moreover, the first time in my life found a soulmate in the form of Helen friend Mr. Burns (Freya Park).
Judi Dench a Mia Wasikowska

Judi Dench and Mia Wasikowska

Her incurable illness forcing Jane to burn bridges and make the relative safety of the boarding school to meet the uncertain fate. Coincidentally, finds himself in a remote Thornfield estate, which the government a strong hand, Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender). Here you can get a job girl governess to Mr Rochester is in custody. Modest and intelligent Jane becomes obľúbenkyňou housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfaxovej (Judi Dench) and surprisingly the house of the Lord himself, who finds her soul mate. Unfortunately, neither her happiness at Thornfield nepokvitne may be a seemingly inexplicable and rather spooky phenomena, which occurs here and also becoming darker mood Rochester. Scary night, after which nothing will be as before, made her escape to the next. They suspect, however, that abandons forever Thornfield. The attraction's owner is a magical city that is in Jane awoke, are stronger than his dark nature.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 4:24 pm

http://www.allisonandbusby.com/info/blog/reader-i-saw-the-film%E2%80%A6/

‘Reader, I saw the film…’

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

In the next few weeks I will be making a point of visiting my local cinema to see the latest adaptation of Jane Eyre starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender. What I’ve heard of it so far, particularly how it has been structured, with much of the early portion of the story told in flashbacks, sounds very promising. But when I pause a moment I can honestly say that it was a film that didn’t have to be made - I thought the recent-ish BBC version with Toby Stephens ticked all the right boxes. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. By my reckoning (with a bit of help from Google) there have been six major productions in the past sixty-odd years.

Is Jane a character that every generation needs to see afresh?

Are there any neglected books that you think more than deserve an adaptation, or which, indeed, should have been left well enough alone?

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Fri Sep 23, 2011 5:21 pm

http://reneesweet.livejournal.com/191536.html

Previous Entry
Jane Eyre

Sep. 22nd, 2011 at 7:26 PM

aragorn worn out
I recently watched the 2011 version of Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland), Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Basterds), and Jamie Bell (Billy Elliot). It was excellent. Mia Wasikowska brought the same sense of presence and understated passion (if that makes any sense at all) as she did to her phenomenal performance of Alice in Alice in Wonderland. And Michael Fassbender was FANTASTIC as Rochester: volatile, passionate, tortured, soulful.

The screenplay adaptation was well done. I brought out my highly scribbled-upon copy of the book and, as I flipped through, was impressed with how much of the dialogue and narrative description were carried out verbatim on the screen. There were a few choices that I thought could have been made a little differently to portray Rochester in a slightly more balanced light--there are a few scenes where he is absolutely irredeemable and every time Jane (and I) fell in love with him in subsequent scenes, I found myself thinking back and wondering how we could fall for someone who could be such an asshole at times (pardon my candor).

Also? The score, by Dario Marianelli, is divine. I've been listening to it both at work and at home. It features British violin virtuoso Jack Liebeck, whose solos haunt my mind hours after I turn off my iPod. The Jane Eyre score just might be the theme music to my new book. Very Happy

I would definitely recommend the movie to any fans of the novel.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:25 pm

http://www.realmovienews.com/reviews/movies/4178

25th September 2011 Red square
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jamiekelwick's score:
4 out of 5

Jane Eyre (2011) Directed by:

Cary Fukunaga
Jane Eyre (2011) Written by:

Jane Eyre (2011) Cast:

Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judy Dench, Sally Hawkins, Jamie Bell
Jane Eyre (2011) U.S. Distributor:

Focus Features
Jane Eyre (2011) U.K. Distributor:

Universal Pictures
Jane Eyre (2011) U.S. Cinema Release Date:

11th Mar 2011
Jane Eyre (2011) U.K. Cinema Release Date:

9th Sep 2011

Visit our Movie Information Page for Jane Eyre (2011)!
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Jane Eyre (2011) Synopsis:

Mia Wasikowska ("Alice in Wonderland") and Michael Fassbender ("Inglourious Basterds") star in the romantic drama based on Charlotte Bronte's classic novel, from acclaimed director Cary Fukunaga ("Sin Nombre"). In the story, Jane Eyre flees Thornfield House, where she works as a governess for wealthy Edward Rochester. As she reflects upon the people and emotions that have defined her, it is clear that the isolated and imposing residence - and Mr. Rochester's coldness - have sorely tested the young woman's resilience, forged years earlier when she was orphaned. She must now act decisively to secure her own future and come to terms with the past that haunts her - and the terrible secret that Mr. Rochester is hiding and that she has uncovered...
Jane Eyre (2011) Review:

After a bleak childhood, Jane Eyre goes out into the world to become a governess. As she lives happily in her new position at Thornfield Hall, she meets the dark, cold, and abrupt master of the house, Mr. Rochester. Jane and her employer grow close in friendship and she soon finds herself falling in love with him. Happiness seems to have found Jane at last, but could Mr. Rochester's terrible secret be about to destroy it forever?

A vivid adaptation of the Charlotte Bronte beloved novel, Jane Eyre is a timeless love story.

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska are stunning and with good support from Jamie Bell and Dame Judy Dench, this is a must watch for all Bronte and period drama fans.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:39 pm

http://www.odt.co.nz/entertainment/film/179219/film-review-jane-eyre

FILM REVIEW: 'Jane Eyre'

Sat, 24 Sep 2011
> Jane Eyre
5 stars (out of 5)

Director: Cary Fukunaga
Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Amelia Clarkson, Sally Hawkins, Simon McBurney, Freya Parks, Georgia Bourke, Imogen Poots
Rating: (M)


Jane Eyre is my favourite novel. I read it in one delirious gulp in my early 20s and have never since had the courage to reread it in case it no longer cast the same spell on me.

This latest filmed Jane Eyre (Rialto) astonished and delighted me by summing up the fever that reading induced. Instead of following the novel's order and starting with Jane's horror childhood, the movie begins at fever pitch as a distraught Jane (Mia Wasikowska) flees into the wild moors.

The rest of the story leading to her escape is told in flashback.

As my dominant memory of the novel is an orgy of barely suppressed emotions, this movie suits me fine. It actually has many faults.

Michael Fassbender is a superlative Rochester but only gets a fraction of the screen time he deserves. It is to his credit that we realise why Jane loves his character so, because he certainly gets no help from the script.

The delicious Gothic cliche that Charlotte Bronte invented of the mad woman locked in the attic is also underplayed. But none of the faults matter, because it plunges you immediately into Jane's despair and that heightened emotion carries the entire film.


Best thing: The Derbyshire moors standing in for the more famous Yorkshire ones. They are real eerie country.

Worst thing: I loved this so much that I would only be truly happy with the same cast doing a line-by-line reading that went for at least eight hours.

See it with: A lace-trimmed handkerchief and some smelling salts in your reticule.

- Christine Powely

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:02 pm

http://www.whitbygazette.co.uk/lifestyle/entertainment/bronte_s_tale_gets_a_good_eyre_ing_1_3848492

Monday 10 October 2011

Bronte’s tale gets a good Eyre-ing ...
Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre.

Published on Friday 7 October 2011 02:47

A BOLD, atmospheric, stunningly filmed new adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s classic love story is coming to Whitby.

After fleeing the imposing Thornfield Hall, Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska) runs across the eerie, foggy moor until she arrives at the door of young clergyman St John Rivers (Jamie Bell).

While recuperating, Jane reflects on the experiences that formed her, from a Dickensian childhood to her employment as governess for the cruel, cold Edward Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

Anyone who’s familiar with Charlotte Bronte’s much-filmed classic will recognise that this is a brave departure from the text.

Director Cary Fukanaga (‘Sin Nombre’) frames the story as a series of flashbacks, underlining how Jane is haunted by her past.

He also gets the best out of a to-die-for cast.

There’s a stand-out central performance by ‘Alice in Wonderland’ star Mia Wasikowska. Michael Fassbender makes a memorable Rochester.

And the great Judi Dench is on excellent form as Thornfield’s all-knowing housekeeper, Mrs Fairfax.

Screenings take place Saturday 15 October and Sunday 16 October at 2.30pm, and on Monday 17 October at 7.30pm.

Tickets are £6 for adults and £5 for children.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:19 pm

http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/entertainment/5742999/Finding-beauty-within

Finding beauty within
DAVID MANNING
Last updated 12:31 06/10/2011

With Charlotte Bronte's 1847 novel Jane Eyre having more adaptations in film and TV than any other novel, the latest version begs the question, why so many and why another?

The answer is partly that Jane Eyre provides the quintessential feminist heroine, particularly notable for being so in the context of a Victorian patriarchal society.

Jane is a young woman who may be as plain-looking as she is plain-spoken but is also intelligent and independent, honest and humble, spirited and soulful – and, despite being "poor and obscure" and alone in the world, has an instinctive sense of self-respect and self-reliance.

Jane Eyre is also a novel blending romance, drama and suspense in a Gothic setting, and features a brooding, Byronic character in the form of Edward Fairfax Rochester, the master of Thornfield Hall, where young Jane becomes governess to his ward.

Jane's story is well-conceived and well-told – and despite becoming well-known still prompts new interpretations and renderings of it. There are reportedly nearly 30 previous film and TV versions, more than the novels of Jane Austen or even Charles Dickens have inspired.

Director Cary Joji Fukunaga ensconces this Jane Eyre in a shadowy, foreboding setting and moodily emphasises the repressed emotions in Jane's developing liaison with Rochester as well as her sense of equality and freedom in their relationship.

There's little light, colour or sunshine in this dark telling, more creeping nightmare in its mystery than swoony dream in its love story from which to awaken.

Screenwriter Moira Buffini (Tamara Drewe) is innovative in her re-construction and necessary streamlining of Bronte's novel. It opens with a distraught adult Jane on the moors on a stormy night and eventually finding refuge with a clergyman (Jamie Bell) and his two sisters.

From this present, the film briefly flashes back to Jane's "tale of woe", her maltreatment as an orphan child (Amelia Clarkson) at the hands of a cruel aunt (Sally Hawkins) and then in a cruel Dickensian charity school before the story proper begins with her arrival at Thornfield Hall (where Judi Dench shows up as the housekeeper).

Here is the heart of the tale and where the burden falls on Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender to make a familiar story still engage, move and satisfy.

Australian Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, The Kids Are All Right) arguably brings to life the most genuine and convincing screen portrayal of Jane. For starters, she's the right age – 19 when making the film, the age of Jane in the novel – and looks the part. But in her countenance is a steely belief in her self-worth which, allied to an innate morality in her behaviour and a compassion that allows forgiveness, illuminates the captivating beauty inside her.
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Fassbender's Rochester is initially a sardonic, cynical, depressed man harbouring a dark secret inside his house and whose inner torment is both eased and exacerbated by his attraction to Jane.

No doubt Jane Eyre will be made again; the challenge then will be to not only be as accomplished as Fukunaga's film but achieve the unexpected freshness he instills in such a familiar classic tale.

- Nelson

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:24 pm

bowmanvillefilmsociety:

What is up with this movie? Everything’s so pretty and muted.

Anyway, let me tell you something silly. You may or may not have noticed that I’m pretty on top of watching the movies for this club. It’s partly because I’m just plain excited to watch them, and partly because I’m crazy and take too much pleasure in checking things off my to-do list. I have, however, been putting off watching Jane Eyre.

I loved it so much the first time that I’ve been worried that I must’ve been mistaken, that this time the awesome script and acting wouldn’t be enough for me to forgive the choppiness.

But, guess what! I enjoyed it all the same this time.

I still hate the opening montage of Jane running around the rainy English countryside lost and crying. I’m just like, what are you doing? Your best impression of Frodo Baggins in the Dead Marshes? Give it a rest!

Otherwise though, Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender still blew my socks off. They’re wearing so many layers of uncomfortable clothing, but this s$#! is so sexy! How is this happening? (Expert eye contact, that’s how!)

Jane and Rochester don’t have one lame filler scene in this entire movie. It’s like they only have two modes with each other: Clever and flirty or intellectual and anguished. Either way, it’s pushing all my romance buttons.

And then just look at Rochester in that last screenshot… doing his best unhinged Billy Chenowith impersonation up there… I’m powerless to fight it. Damn you, Fassbender!

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:21 pm

fobsfilmspot:
Jane Eyre

I’d call it a pretty effective interpretation of Jane Eyre, except I was just so disappointed in the ending performances were great, it was a refreshing way to tell the story by starting when Jane arrives at St John’s doorstep - my whole experience was just diminished by an ineffective ending.

As Mr Rochester, Michael Fassbender was pretty awesome - he managed to play him hard, but you see the small smiles and softer personality in the nuance of his expression - the character can so easily become unlikeable, but Fassbender allows you to still connect with him. I wasn’t quite as impressed with Mia Wasikowska as Jane - she was good, and plained up and all, it just - she was too sure of herself, maybe, too sure of her opinions. Maybe I need to read the book again, but she just didn’t quite fit my persona for Jane.

Their relationship, however, was told really effectively - Carly Fukunaga (the director) and Moira Buffini (the screenwriter) have done a great job at ensuring the audience understand fully what they are both thinking, and can then comfortably just wait for Jane and Rochester to catch up. I thought, from watching the trailers, that the scary parts of the book would be so much worse - the flashes of shadow, and silhouette of a woman sitting on Jane’s bed - I was terrified seeing them on the trailer, but I wasn’t at all scared watching here. It has to be said, I saw it on a plane, so possibly the atmosphere wasn’t quite right.

So it was, genuinely, a very well done version of Jane eyre. Is just that they didn’t want it to become too melodramatic, or maybe they thought a subtle ending suited the small story better. But after the drama you get sent through, no matter that it’s not any major tragedy - you just want a decent pay off, and I just don’t think they quite delivered. Worth seeing, definitely, I just wouldn’t hang out for the ending.

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 18, 2012 12:39 am

pipsdaspixie:
Jane Eyre

I watched it finally, and I liked it I read the book about eight years ago. So, my memories on all the details was rather sketchy at times but I did remember most of the important things.

This is also the movie that had me searching out Michael Fassbender. I was curious to know who was going to play Mr. Rochester in the newest movie, I saw the name and had to go to the handy dandy IMDB, and realized that I’ve seen Michael Fassbender in a lot of movies. So while I can’t say I’ve been a fan of him for a long time knowingly, I have always enjoyed every time I’ve seen him in a movie.

Back to the actual overview of the movie. I liked the feel of it, it really got the creepy moments down from the book and those creepy moments were done really well. I enjoyed Mia Wasikowska’s Jane very much she wasn’t exactly what I imagined when I read the book (though that image is somewhat fuzzy over the years) but she fits into the mold fairly well.

Of course, Michael’s Rochester was done well, the physicality he used with the character was done well too. However, every moment they used the lines that referred to how not attractive Rochester is, I couldn’t help but smirk. Mia pulled of the semi-plain better (despite her being a gorgeous girl) than Michael pulled off not being attractive (then again I am a biased person).

Still I enjoyed the movie very much I loved the fact that it went over her staying with the Rivers and I did enjoy the love montage of Jane and Rochester (Something I didn’t remember in the book). Of course anytime anything went wrong I shook my hand in the air and called out “Bertha”.

Movie score: 8.5/10

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Re: Jane Eyre reviews 7

Post by Admin on Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:52 pm

resasreviews:
Jane Eyre (2011)

image

Reader, I watched it.

I know I’m a little bit late, but last week I finally made it and immediately fell in love with it.

I’ve read the novel about two years ago so I knew most of the plot, which din’t make it less interesting I think. I can remember that while reading the book, I was a little bit bored, when Jane was in Lowood. I know it’s an important part of the book, but when you read it for the first time you don’t know that it will become so much more exciting. But this movie made it exactly right:

1) The adaption

The movie uses a flashback. At the beginning the audience sees a depressive and desperate woman, who seems to flee from something. Jane is being rescued by nice people and the viewers (together with the Rivers family) get to know the story behind the disillusionesed woman. Via flashbacks we travel to Jane’s life at her aunts, at Lowood and finally at Thornfield. And I have to say, I really liked that point of view. I didn’t feel like a biography of a girl in the middle of the 19th century, but much more like a story of how Jane became the person she is now. While her early years always felt like flashbacks, her life at Thornfield was potrayed in a different way. Since you didn’t see any scenes from the “present”, you lost the feeling that you were in a flashback more and more. The audience begins to settle in at Thornfield and to feel comfortable. Especially after the engagement, we’ve already forgotten that Jane will come to a point, where she wants to die. Consequently, the revelation that Mrs Rochester is living in the attics comes as a great suprise. (Especially, if you haven’t read the book.) If you already knew that this was going to happen, then you’ve been dreading this part from the first moment you saw Mr Rochester. When you see once again the scenes from the beginning you realize that Jane’s situation is REALLY bad.

I have to say that they stayed very true to the book and tried everything they could to leave as much conversations from the book in the movie as possible. And though they added some scenes (Jane’s daydream of Mr Rochester), they only stress Jane’s emotion in order to convey them to the audience. (And I have to confess that this actually was one of my favourite scenes! I so much wished that Mr Rochester was real at that moment and both actors were so great in that scene!)

All in all, a great adaption!

2) The actors

This movie was the first with Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowsa that I saw, so I didn’t know their acting. But I must say that I was swept away by their perfomances.

image

Mia Wasikowska hardly moves an eyebrow in the movie, but when she does move her face, you get blown away by all the feelings the movement expresses. Jane Eyre is supposed to be an earnest and, well, plain woman and Mia’s perfomance fit to my “interpretation” of Jane’s character. Just remember the scene after Mr Mason’s departure! In my opinion, you could just see it perfectly in her eyes how she tries to understand what Mr Rochester is saying. You can see that longing for him. So just perfect! Another great scene was the proposal scene, where every emotion that Jane carried deep down in her soul, suddenly broke out of her. Her desperation and agony and after that her hope and bliss were perfect! The last scene to mention is of course Jane’s break down. All I wanted to do is go to Mia and hug her and tell her that everything will be fine!

image

Michael Fassbender on the other hand potrayed the byronic hero as none other actor could do. The sudden changes of his mood, his mysteriousness and at some times his self-contempt were pictured all in Michael Fassbender’s face. Especially in his conversations with Jane at the beginning, the playfullness and on the other hand his arrogance were all in Fassbender’s perfomance. The little smiles he let break through… Who wouldn’t want to live with such a Mr Rochester? And after that facade broke down and Rochester feared to lose his dearest Jane forever, Rochester’s pain and his longing for Jane were conveyed in a perfect way. Fassbender showed great emotions that suited the byronic character of Mr Rochester.

All in all, perfect actors!

3) The pictures

What I especially like about this adaption was these pretty “pictures” of landscapes, flowers, and houses in the background. While the Reed’s manor is held in comically bright colours, Jane’s school is much darker and held in browner colours. These colours don’t change when Jane comes to Thornfield, which underlines the gothic atmosphere of the manor very well. But from the moment of the engagement Jane’s spring begins and all the flowers begin to bloom. In my opinion these colours are a great way to show that Jane is finally(!) really happy with her life.

image

Of course this changes again, when Jane escapes and finds the Rivers family. The colours become “earthier” (not sure if this is a word) and again darker.

All in all, I really liked the “symbolic” character of the colours and the pictures in the movie. And even if you don’t like the story (but who does that?), you can enjoy the beautiful landscapes of Yorkshire.

4) Summary

This movie has become one of my favourites very fast. Highly remmonded, especially if you like the book or any other literary adaption (Pride and Prejudice).

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