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Jane Eyre thoughts

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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:11 am

http://wegotthiscovered.com/movies/jane-eyre/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=jane-eyre

Looking Forward To Jane Eyre?
Posted 15 February 2011 | Author: Amy Curtis

jane eyre movie photo 02 550x366 Looking Forward To Jane Eyre?

In yet another remake of the classic novel of gothic romance and intrigue, Focus Features’ Jane Eyre is the newest installment in a growing oeuvre. If the trailers and teasers are any indication, this version may be the best yet. The film can boast of a great ensemble cast including Alice in Wonderland’s Mia Wasikowska as titular character Jane, and Michael Fassbender (of upcoming Prometheus) as the tortured Mr. Rochester.

This film’s trailers seems to indicate some good things. The cinematography, costuming, scenery; everything has that gothic period drama feel. It’s 19th century England, and we can only expect the best as far as accurate representations from production companies Focus Features and BBC Films.

According to published synopsis, the script stays true to the source material. No “re-imagining” or modernizations here. Jane Eyre will be a plain, morally upstanding woman who uses her intelligence and honesty to navigate the tricky waters of life and love. Mr. Rochester (and I can’t think of a better Mr. Rochester than Fassbender, who always looks a little broody to me) is a temperamental, brooding aristocrat with some dangerous secrets.

In the novel written by Charlotte Bronte, audiences experience a sad and lonely childhood with Jane. After graduating from a strict charitable institution, Jane becomes a governess under the dark and forbidding towers of Thornfield Hall. The master of Thornfield is the mysterious Mr. Rochester. Against the norms of the time, Jane and Mr. Rochester fall into a forbidden love. Before things can be set to right, a few skeletons in the closet doom their relationship.

The great cast led by Fassbender and Wasikowska includes Judi Dench, Jamie Bell (most recently of The Eagle) and Imogen Poots (also in upcoming Fright Night remake). Cary Fukanaga directs this Jane Eyre. Both he and screenwriter Moira Buffini are relatively unknown quantities. Despite this question mark, I think the look and feel of what I’ve seen so far is hopeful. In the end, this version will have to be not only true to the original classic novel, but must capture the dark intensity of the relationships and the virtue of Jane (without making her pretentious, or boring). Joining a pool of about 20 film and/or TV versions already out there, this Jane Eyre must stand out in a big way.

Jane Eyre will be released on March 11th.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:16 pm

http://bookishmagpie.blogspot.com/2011/02/new-jane-eyre-movie-out-this-year.html

Wednesday, February 16, 2011
New "Jane Eyre" movie out this year!

This latest movie version of Jane Eyre looks like it will be very good! It stars Michael Fassbender as Edward Rochester, Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre, Jamie Bell as St John Rivers, and Judi Dench as Mrs. Fairfax.

The movie is due to be released in the USA on 11 March 2011 (lucky them!). We have to wait until 9 September 2011 for it to be released in the UK. I'm looking forward to seeing it!

'Jane Eyre' Theatrical Trailer (via Yahoo! Movies):

If you haven't yet read Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, I suggest you do. It's one of the great literary classics and a wonderful (and suspenseful) love story.

Posted by Bookish Magpie at 5:02 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:19 pm

http://kaitlinhanger.blogspot.com/2011/02/cant-wait-for-jane-eyre.html

Sunday, February 20, 2011
Jane Eyre, MY HERO, Coming to Town
Charlotte Brontes' Jane Eyre was a favorite book when I was a kid. I must have read it 8 times between the age of 8 and before I finished college, and have returned to it 3 or 4 times since. I guess it was Jane's habit of going off into the corners of her aunt's house to hide behind the curtains with a book that hooked me! Or maybe it was the voice in her head that was so defiant, my favorite quote from the book being, "If all the world hated you, and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved you, and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends."

Some other favorite lines:

* "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will."
* "Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last."

I am on pins and needles waiting for the new film release coming out March1...Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, and the incomparable Dame JUDI DENCH, whom I (obviously) love. It's being directed by Cary Fukunaga--a great break for a talented guy. I will probably download and watch it 20 times after seeing it in the theater.

Check out the official movie website at http://focusfeatures.com/jane_eyre if you too are a fan of the Brontes!

Posted by Kaitlin Hanger, Ph.D. at 10:05 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Feb 25, 2011 4:10 am

http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2011/02/24/134029161/your-2011-books-into-films-lineup-from-eyre-to-water-to-desert

Your 2011 Books-Into-Films Lineup, From 'Eyre' To 'Water' To 'Desert'

06:20 pm

February 24, 2011

by Rachel Syme

The official poster for Lone Scherfig's adaptation of David Nicholls' One Day.

Ever since the days of Gone With The Wind, Hollywood producers have been optioning bestselling books and whipping them into celluloid hits. At the Oscars this year, several books-and-now-they're-films will get nods, from The Social Network (loosely based on Ben Mezrich's The Accidental Billionaires, which was loosely based on the lives of the smooth-cheeked geniuses behind Facebook) to True Grit (read Charles Portis' novel! Really, just do it), to 127 Hours (nee Between a Rock and a Hard Place), because some people prefer reading about a person slicing his own arm off to watching it happen.

But as the Oscars are almost here and will soon be over, and we have a long year ahead of us, I've decided to focus on (and give you a little preview of) the bumper crop of upcoming films based on books coming out in 2011. Some of them are based on masterpieces (I never met a Bronte sister I didn't like), and some, well...some are based on Something Borrowed. But they are all worth bringing up at your next dinner party when there's an uncomfortable lull in the conversation — because nothing can fill that space like debating whether or not the source material is better than the film, and so on. It's small talk gold.

Jane Eyre (March 11)
JaneEyre

The Book: You read it in seventh grade, if you'll recall. But to jog your memory: Charlotte Bronte wrote her most famous work in 1847, inventing the original plain Jane. "Poor and little" Jane works in a drafty old house for the handsome (if not abjectly creepy) Mr. Rochester, who definitely keeps his crazy wife in the attic. It's a Gothic thriller with strong female characters, and if you haven't read it yet, do get on that.

The Film: It actually looks good! Director Cary Fukunaga's debut, Sin Nombre, was a gorgeous film, and his remake of Eyre has the blessing of BBC Films behind it. Mia Wasikowska is earning a name for herself in the literary movie genre (she played Alice in last year's Burton adaptation of the Lewis Carroll story), and looks as if she can hold her own against Michael Fassbender's imposing Rochester. The trailer is here.

See It With: Your period-drama (and possibly collectible doll?) loving aunt.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 26, 2011 2:52 am

http://staging-site.focusfeatures.com/editorblog/npr_tunes_into_upcoming_novel_adaptations_including_jane_eyre_/view

NPR tunes into upcoming novel adaptations including Jane Eyre and One Day

By Peter Bowen February 25, 2011

Rachel Syme at NPR looks at the recent parade of books into film in her piece “Your 2011 Books-Into-Films Lineup, From Eyre To Water To Desert.” She looks in on two Focus films: Jane Eyre and One Day. Although she has not seen One Day, she does note: “the movie poster has emerged, and it is steamy.” Top on her list is Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre. After giving a quick summary of the novel–– “drafty old house,” “semi-handsome (if not abjectly creepy) Mr. Rochester”––she gives the good news:

It actually looks good! Director Cary Fukunaga's debut, Sin Nombre, was a gorgeous film, and his remake of Eyre has the blessing of BBC Films behind it. Mia Wasikowska is earning a name for herself in the literary movie genre (she played Alice in last year's Burton adaptation of the Lewis Carroll story), and looks as if she can hold her own against Michael Fassbender's imposing Rochester.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:33 am

http://riskyregencies.blogspot.com/2011/02/jane-eyre.html

Jane Eyre

Maybe I'm still living under a rock, so apologies if this has been discussed here before. I just found out about this new version of JANE EYRE, starring Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska and due out in theatres on March 11.

But I won't get my hopes up too much. I’ve had a rough relationship with JANE EYRE on film. I have liked all the actresses who've played Jane but too often the casting of Mr. Rochester or some other factor don't quite work for me.

The 1943 version (Orson Welles, Joan Fontaine) version captured some of the feeling of the book but tampered too much with the plot and dialogue for my taste.

I have not seen the 1970 (George C. Scott, Susannah York) version. How did that happen? Should I look for a copy?

The 1983 (Timothy Dalton, Zelah Clarke) miniseries was pretty good, I thought, but he came off a bit too handsome for Rochester. I find this cover amusing, relegating the title character to the background!

As for the 1996 (William Hurt, Charlotte Gainsbourg) version, all I can say is I like Hurt much better in other roles.

I had high hopes for the 1997 movie with Ciaran Hinds and Samantha Morton, but I was disappointed. I like both the actors but felt the film felt rushed to fit a target length.

Finally, I loved the 2006 miniseries with Toby Stephens and Ruth Wilson. It is easily my favorite adaptation.

Hopefully this new version will be at least as good. Check out the trailer. What do you think? Which versions will it have to contend for to be your Favorite Jane Eyre Adaptation?

Elena

Posted by Elena Greene on Saturday, February 26, 2011
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 01, 2011 3:46 pm

http://sdcountylib.wordpress.com/2011/03/01/2011-books-into-films-from-eyre-to-water-to-desert/

Jane Eyre (March 11)

The Book: You read it in seventh grade, if you’ll recall. But to jog your memory: Charlotte Bronte wrote her most famous work in 1847, inventing the original plain Jane. “Poor and little” Jane works in a drafty old house for the semi-handsome (if not abjectly creepy) Mr. Rochester, who definitely keeps his crazy wife in the attic. It’s a Gothic thriller with strong female characters, and if you haven’t read it yet, do get on that.

The Film: It actually looks good! Director Cary Fukunaga’s debut, Sin Nombre, was a gorgeous film, and his remake of Eyre has the blessing of BBC Films behind it. Mia Wasikowska is earning a name for herself in the literary movie genre (she played Alice in last year’s Burton adaptation of the Lewis Carroll story), and looks as if she can hold her own against Michael Fassbender’s imposing Rochester. The trailer is here.

See It With: Your period-drama (and possibly collectible doll?) loving aunt.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 03, 2011 6:35 am

http://artsfuse.org/?p=23981

Coming Attractions in Film: March 2011
Coming Attractions, Film Add comments
Feb 272011

March is shaping up to be the month for strong, female leads. Hollywood has its eye turned toward the classics, with Jane Eyre, Red Riding Hood, and a modern, stylized take on Alice in Wonderland in Sucker Punch. In addition, Boston hosts several film festivals including Jewishfilm.2011, the Irish Film Festival, and Wild & Scenic Film Festival.

Jane Eyre. Wide release, March 11. Finally, a film in a style worthy of the book. This eerie take follows orphan Jane Eyre as she makes her way through an unhappy childhood and schooling to become governess at Thornfield Hall. There, Jane meets her brooding employer Edward Rochester and unravels the mysteries hidden in the man and the house itself. The two stars Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Basterds) look poised to give stellar, subdued performances in this dark remake.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 03, 2011 6:35 am

http://themarginalian.blogspot.com/2011/02/rochester.html

February 27, 2011
Rochester

I have never been a fan of the Brontes - I find their novels too dark and moody. I appreciate their art but I never actively reread their novels (unlike Austen or Montgomery). And I never really enjoy movies made based on their novels. Until now. They remade Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska as Jane and the ruggedly handsome Michael Fassbender as Mr. Rochester. Check out their electric chemistry in the clip above. I have read a few articles on this movie and I think the director used a different kind of treatment that I am excited to see. And of course, to see Fassbender smoulder as Rochester.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 03, 2011 8:29 pm

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/popcornprejudiceamovieblog/2014391809_off_for_the_weekend_with_jane.html

March 3, 2011 at 3:41 PM

Posted by Moira Macdonald

I'm off tomorrow, making up for Oscar night. But tonight (Thursday), when some of you are at "North by Northwest," I'll be at a screening of "Jane Eyre." Looking forward to it; the Charlotte Bronte novel is one of my all-time favorites, and I'm curious what Cary Fukunaga can bring to it. And I wonder if it'll measure to a truly excellent version of "Jane Eyre" made by the BBC a few years back, starring Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens (who is, for the record, the son of Dame Maggie Smith). It's not fair to compare the two -- the BBC "Jane Eyre" was a four-hour television version, whereas Fukunaga's will be half the length -- but it's intriguing to consider the casting. In this scene, early on, Stephens seems to have just the right mixture of dreamboat and brooding misanthrope, and Wilson nicely plays Jane's smart but not yet wise innocence.

Mia Wasikowska (of "Alice in Wonderland" and "The Kids Are All Right") plays Jane in the new film, opposite Michael Fassbender ("Fish Bowl") as Rochester, and I can see how it just might work. (Plus Judi Dench as the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax.) (And plus that the screenwriter is named Moira Buffini, a name I find inexplicably charming.) Have a lovely weekend, at Thornfield Hall or otherwise, and we'll talk "Jane Eyre" soon.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Sat Mar 05, 2011 6:47 pm

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/03/04/951329/-Books-That-Changed-My-Life-Jane-Eyre

Fri Mar 04, 2011 at 08:20 AM EST
Books That Changed My Life-Jane Eyre

by coquiero for Readers and Book Lovers

Books That Changed My Life is a new diary series that began last week with a stirring diary by Aravir. If you missed it, you may and should read it here.

It was difficult to choose which single book or groups of books have changed me most. I've been an avid reader since I was very young, to the point where I would neglect pretty much everything to read--I used to get yelled at by my Mom for reading when I should have been doing homework.

If I'm honest with myself, however, I can't deny the impact that Jane Eyre has had on my life. I feel like I grew up with her, like she's a friend that I lost contact with many years ago, but then met up with again, our relationship re-kindled in the blink of an eye.

The first time i read Jane Eyre was in 1983. I was thirteen years old, and was captivated by the BBC mini-series that had played on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre. What a concrete argument for keeping funding for PBS--it brings young people to literature in a way that can't be measured. The old copy I first read from my mother's shelves was lost to history, as they say, until I ran into it again years later on the shelves of my sister's summer home. Like my mother, she just likes to have the books around, she never actually reads them. It was like finding a treasure, opening up the green cloth cover to find my youthful signature on the inside. I had marked it as my own even back then, and after discovering my signature I insisted that I was taking it home with me.

Back then, Jane Eyre was was a melodramatic romance to me, pure and simple. On one hand it was a classic damsel in distress story where the princess-who-didn't-really-know-she's-a-princess is rescued by the rich hero who recognizes her nobility despite her shabby appearance. That thrilled me on a very Disney level, but I think what seeped into my subconscious was the much more powerful idea that Jane Eyre was a manifesto for young, not-so-attractive, smart girls (me!). We, too, could win the heart of the hero, if only we could find the right hero. I didn't know back then what a Byronic Hero was, or that I was setting myself up to search for a man as unrealistic as the teen heart-throbs of the age (personally I was a Ricky Schroeder groupie). All I knew was that I loved the idea of winning over a man with one's brain and wit and goodness.

What I didn't realize at the time but now can see clearly was that I was also obsessed with books about orphans. I didn't have a very good family situation, with a clinically depressed mother and a philandering father who wasn't around much. I devoured books about children on their own, books about self-reliance and childish internal resources. Jane's early years, raised by relatives who didn't care for her, then later cast off into an abusive boarding school, gave me backbone and courage. I didn't need the approval of my chronically withdrawn mother, I would make my own way in the world, I was smart and self-reliant, just like Jane. I would study hard and find my way out into the wide world. And so I did. If I met a swarthy, broad-chested, rich man who loved mye for my wit and goodness along the way, all the better!

As I made my way along the path of Young Adulthood, Jane stuck by my side, all through the relationship with the Boy Who Always Had His Eye Out For Something Better, through the Dreadful Philandering Boyfriend and through the Ominously Clingy Boyfriend. She whispered in my ear that she understood why, with my background, I would be attracted to such men. She told me that eventually I would be rid of them and move on to normalcy, while they would be cast off into the bin of my life, a lesson learned and never forgotten. She was right, of course.

Jane always, always believed in herself, despite whatever authority was telling her she was a liar, or ungrateful, or ugly; even when that authority was Rochester, the man she loved more than anything, trying to love her into submission. She stayed true to herself. She thought things through with her heart and her logical brain, checking her passionate feelings and remaining faithful to the lessons taught to her by her hard early life. She cast off the hypocrisy of religion, relying instead on her own innate sense of the morality that God asks of us. It was a revolutionary thought, that people could look upon their pastors and priests with skepticism and judge them as men.

Jane's ability to check her passionate side came back to lend a hand later in life, once I married a man that I can now see bears a remarkable resemblance to Mr. Rochester, (minus the rich aristocracy, I'm afraid). My son says to me, "Mama, Papa is a complicated man, isn't he?", and I reply, "Yes, son, he is." Moody, quick-tempered, but devoted and very aware of his shortcomings, always striving to be a better man. He treats me as an equal (and in many ways, he treats me like a superior), but has his macho, protective side, too. During arguments, Jane taught me to keep my tongue still and let him argue himself into a resolution. A quiet nudge here and there keeps him going in the right direction. Jane's few arguments with Rochester and later with St. John Rivers, a formidable man with an iron will, are marvels of quiet resistance and subtle will. Those poor men had no idea what they were up against.

What Jane taught me more than anything is to know myself, and to be true to myself. I'm not the greatest person, none of us are. We're not perfect. I don't live my life like many of my neighbors or family members; I have different ideas about raising my children (I was the only person in our California neighborhood who insisted my children call adults Mr. and Mrs.), I have different ideas about politics and religion than many people I meet here in the suburbs of northern Virginia. But like Jane, I try to keep them mostly to myself and live as I feel I should. We might not have tons of friends or a crazy social life of dinner parties and backyard barbecues, but, like Jane and Rochester, we live our quiet life together and are always happy to be in each others company.

As one final note, I consider myself a writer; not one of any note or success, but I did write a novel a few years back about a young girl who grows up the close acquaintance of Death, and who must at one point make a choice between engaging in Life that she sees going on all around her, or retreating to a quiet existence with Death, not knowing what will come of her once she actually does die. Only when I had finished the book and was working on re-writes, did I realize what I had done. Young girl, orphaned, living with an adequate but uninterested guardian, befriended by an older man (in this case, WAY older) who wants her to choose an unconventional life with him.

Oh, crap, I thought. She's Jane. Luckily, the similarities between the two novels ended there, but it goes to show you what kind of a deep impact Jane Eyre has on my psyche.

Thanks for reading. I think this has been a ridiculously long diary. If you've made it this far, give yourselves a clap on the back!!

One more afterthought! A new film version of Jane Eyre is in limited release next Friday, March 11. I'm hearing good buzz about it, that it's modernized but still captures the essence of Bronte's work. It stars Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Basterds) and is directed by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre). Go see it!!

Originally posted to Readers and Book Lovers on Fri Mar 04, 2011 at 08:20 AM EST.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:29 pm

http://austenprose.com/2011/03/07/is-social-media-responsible-for-the-new-jane-eyre-movie/

Is Social Media Responsible for the new Jane Eyre Movie?

7 March 2011 by Laurel Ann (Austenprose)

Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre (2011)

Lots of news in the media this week over the upcoming release of Jane Eyre, the new major motion picture adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s 1847 classic novel produced by the UK trifecta BBC Films, Focus Features and Ruby Films. It premieres in the US on Friday March 11, a full six months before its native land of England, a surprising twist since Yanks usually don’t get anything produced by the BBC until months after it has aired on UK television.

Michael Fassbender as Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre (2011)

We are not complaining mind you, just puzzled at their marketing strategy. Less than two years ago BBC executives declared the death of the bonnet drama announcing a shift from period fare to contemporary stories. When the premiere television producer of period drama for the past thirty years makes ugly noises we believe them and grieved the loss to our entertainment future. Not only have they changed their minds, but they have moved from television production to major theatrical release of a novel that has been adapted into film no less than 18 times. Why the change of heart, and why Jane Eyre?

Sally Hawkins as Mrs. Reed in Jane Eyre (2011)

Social Times blog asks, How Has Facebook Revitalized Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte? They would like you to contemplate the possibility that social media is driving the market.

More than 150 years after her death, author Charlotte Bronte and her lovable character Jane Eyre are more popular than ever, and experts attribute their newfound notoriety to social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter.

They want to clump Jane Austen into the mix too because Austen has an even stronger online presence than the Brontes. Recently Toronto University English professor Deidre Lynch credited Austen’s recent rise in popularity to actor Colin Firth, Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice 1995, for getting “a lot of people got hooked on the novels,” adding “that’s too simple an explanation for Austen’s ever-growing legion of fans. Social media, too, have given Austen a second life.”

Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre (2011)

Devotees of the Bronte’s can be found on Twitter, Facebook and blogs across the Internet, but as someone who searches social media daily for news on Jane Austen and period dramas, we see more chatter and articles on Austen than on the Brontes, by far. If the logic that the new Jane Eyre movie has been fueled by interest on social media, than exponentially, Austen would have ten new movies in production to the Bronte’s one.

Michael Fassbender and Imogen Poots in Jane Eyre (2011)

We are in favor of the new Jane Eyre producer Alison Owen’s pragmatic explanation. It appears that in the world of period costume drama, Jane Eyre is inexpensive to produce.

“It’s set in a house in the middle of a moor,” she explained. “Jane Austen can be quite expensive. You need horses, carriages, houses, gowns. But on the whole Jane Eyre is much more starkly peopled than most period movies. You don’t need swaths of costumes. And scenery costs nothing. Point a camera at those moors, and it looks like a David Lean film.”

So, there you go Janeites. Because Austen’s novels do not have descriptions of clothing, scenery or political times, our projected expectations make adaptation costly to produce. Could we abide an Austen miniseries without fine frocks, carriages or country manor houses to drool over? Would the lack of an assembly balls or walks in the shrubberies make us change the channel?

Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre (2011)

I will let you ponder that a bit and bring this back to those bare bones Brontes. I have seen six Jane Eyre movie or miniseries adaptations in my day. They seem to arrive every seven years or so like hungry cicada eager to devour our hearts. The 1943 Jane Eyre with Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine was my favorite movie for decades. This is a story that demands to remain in black and white. Give it color and you lose the Gothic shadows and creepy coldness that is required. Even the last 2006 version starring Toby Stevens and Ruth Wilson didn’t get it right. Maybe, just maybe this new Jane will be the one. We shall find out next Saturday with family and friends. Hope you go see it too, so we can chat about it on Facebook and Twitter!

Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender in Jane Eyre (2011)

Major Cast

• Jane Eyre – Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland)
• Mr. Rochester – Michael Fassbender (Band of Brothers)
• Mrs. Fairfax – Judi Dench (Lady Catherine de Bourgh – Pride and Prejudice 2005)
• Adele Varens – Romy Settbon Moore
• Mrs. Reed – Sally Hawkins (Anne Elliot – Persuasion 2007)
• Blanche Ingram – Imogen Poots (Fanny Austen Knight – Miss Austen Regrets)
• Lady Ingram – Sophie Ward (Land Girls)
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:46 pm

http://rovingreads.blogspot.com/2011/03/jane-eyre-by-charlotte-bronte.html

Monday, March 7, 2011
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

I finally finished Jane Eyre this weekend, and absolutely loved it! It is a wonderfully romantic novel that also deals with weighty issues like faith, sin, and death. The story is so well-known that there's no need for a review, but I thought I'd touch on some of my favorite themes or moments in the book (note: this post contains some mild spoilers, so if you haven't read the book or don't want to know the story stop now!)

- Jane is in some ways a thoroughly modern heroine, able to take care of herself and remain upright through enormous hardships. She gives freely of forgiveness and love though she has been shown few of those mercies herself, and she knows her own mind and isn't swayed by stronger personalities. When Rochester tries to persuade Jane to live with him as his mistress, she is sorely tempted but knows the pleasure of giving in would not outweigh the consequences:

"...while he spoke, my very conscience and reason turned traitors against me, and charged me with crime in resisting him. They spoke almost as loud as Feeling; and that clamored wildly. “Oh, comply!” it said. “Think of his misery; think of his danger—look at his state when left alone; remember his headlong nature; consider the recklessness following on despair—soothe him; save him; love him; tell him you love him, and will be his. Who in the world cares for you? or who will be injured by what you do?”

Still indomitable was the reply—“I care for myself. The more solitary the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man. I will hold to the principles received by me when I was sane, and not mad—as I am now. Laws and principles are not for the times when there is no temptation: they are for such moments as this, when body and soul rise in mutiny against their rigor; stringent are they; inviolate they shall be. If at my individual convenience I might break them, what would be their worth?"

- I enjoyed the multi-layed presentation of Christians and faith. There are examples of people who are esteemed as Christians but really have none of the qualities, like Mr. Brocklehurst. St. John has the fire and the passion to do great things for God, but he expects perfection out of himself and others and isn't able to temper his expectations with compassion. Jane clings to the law of God as she resists Mr. Rochester in the above passage and realizes she has made him the center of her universe: "I could not, in those days, see God for his creature of whom I had made an idol."

- Neither Jane or Rochester are conventionally attractive, but in the other's eyes they are beautiful. She tenderly cares for him when he loses his sight, and he in turns adores her. Don't we all long to be judged more for our inner selves than for outward appearances? As Mary says on hearing that Rochester and Jane were married, “she'll happen do better for him nor any o’ t’ grand ladies.” And again, “If she ben't one o’ th’ handsomest, she's noan faâl and varry good-natured; and i’ his een she's fair beautiful, onybody may see that.”

Rochester (Toby Stephens) and Jane (Ruth Wilson)
Over the weekend I watched the 2006 Masterpiece adaption with Toby Stephens as Rochester and Ruth Wilson as Jane. For the most part I really enjoyed it, though I wondered at several of the plot changes that seemed unnecessary (instead of dressing as the gypsy fortune-teller, Rochester pays a real one to entertain/question the ladies, St. John finds Jane on the moor instead of her collapsing outside Moor House, Jane has no knowledge of Rochester's injuries before she arrives at Ferndean). I can't wait for the new adaption, starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, which from the looks of the trailer below seems to play up the gothic aspects of the story.

source: personal copy. This book was one of my selections for Subtle Melodrama's 2011 Victorian Literature Reading Challenge.
Posted by Roving Reader at 3:37 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:47 pm

http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/03/08/am-jane-eyre-a-favorite-to-remake/

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Listen to the show
'Jane Eyre' a favorite to remake

"Jane Eyre" has been adapted for the screen more than two dozen times. What makes it such a favorite story?

Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska star in "Jane Eyre," a Focus Features release directed by Cary Fukunaga. (Laurie Sparham)

Steve Chiotakis: Charlotte Bronte's celebrated novel 'Jane Eyre' has been adapted for the screen more than two dozen times. There's another version that opens in theaters this week. Why is this classic in literature being made over and over again?

Here's Marketplace's David Gura.

David Gura: Jane Eyre has been played by Virginia Bruce and Joan Fontaine, Anna Paquin and Charlotte Gainsbourg. In 2006, Rebecca Eaton co-produced an adaptation for "Masterpiece Theater."

Rebecca Eaton: You just know it, well, there are some titles that always, always will pull in viewers.

The novel gives screenwriters and directors a lot of room to be creative, she says, so every version is different.

Eaton: You can either do it extremely compactly, just in the house, with the servants and the crazy wife in the attic, or you can add lots of other dimensions to it.

Similarly, you can do it on a low budget or a high one. Either way, Eaton says, it's the story that sells.

Eaton: I think "Jane Eyre" is every romantic, strong woman's dream come true.

Jane gets recognized for her intelligence and inner strength. She doesn't have to compromise. And in the end, she gets the guy.

In Washington, I'm David Gura for Marketplace.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:48 pm

http://wearemoviegeeks.com/2011/03/jane-eyre-featurette/comment-page-1/

Posted by Michelle McCue
JANE EYRE Featurette

Check out a brand new behind-the-scenes featurette for JANE EYRE including interviews with Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Judi Dench and director Cary Fukunaga!

Synopsis:

Mia Wasikowska (“Alice in Wonderland”) and Michael Fassbender (“Inglourious Basterds”) star in the romantic drama based on Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel, from acclaimed director Cary Fukunaga (“Sin Nombre”). In the story, Jane Eyre flees Thornfield House, where she works as a governess for wealthy Edward Rochester. As she reflects upon the people and emotions that have defined her, it is clear that the isolated and imposing residence – and Mr. Rochester’s coldness – have sorely tested the young woman’s resilience, forged years earlier when she was orphaned. She must now act decisively to secure her own future and come to terms with the past that haunts her – and the terrible secret that Mr. Rochester is hiding and that she has uncovered…

Release Date: Friday, March 11th, 2011 (in New York [at the AMC Theatres Loews Lincoln Square (on Broadway, near 68th Street) and Landmark Theatres' Sunshine Cinema (on Houston Street, west of 1st Avenue)] and Los Angeles [at Pacific Theatres' ArcLight Cinemas (6360 West Sunset Blvd., between Vine and Ivar) and Landmark Theatres' The Landmark (10850 West Pico Blvd., at Westwood Blvd.)]) and Friday, March 18th, 2011 (in additional cities) and Friday, March 25th, 2011 (in additional cities)


(Director Cary Fukunaga (left) and Cinematographer Adriano Goldman (right) on the set of the romantic drama JANE EYRE, a Focus Features release. Photo Credit: Laurie Sparham)

JANE EYRE is rated PG-13 (for some thematic elements including a nude image and brief violent content)

Running Time: 121 minutes. Visit the film on Facebook here.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:57 am

http://www.ivillage.com/jane-eyre-movie-review/1-a-330622

3 Life Lessons Modern Women Can Learn from 'Jane Eyre'

See why the literary classic, brought to the big screen in a movie adaptation (in theaters March 11), is still relevant today
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Angela Matusik ON Mar 9, 2011 at 3:17PM

Jane Eyre

[SPOILER ALERT: DON’T READ IF YOU WANT TO EXPERIENCE JANE EYRE AS AN UNSOILED FLOWER.] Director Cary Joji Fukunaga’s deliciously dark and stormy big-screen adaptation of Jane Eyre (in select theaters on March 11) serves up all the delights of Charlotte Bronte’s classic novel: deep melodrama, broken hearts and a teen-age heroine (Mia Wasikowska, pictured) who never accepts the misfortunes served her way. But in addition to the restrained tears, tight bodices and handsome lords, there are a few lessons in Jane’s story that any modern woman can benefit from:

1. Family not supportive enough? Form your own with friends (or newly discovered cousins). In her youth at Gateshead, the orphaned Jane is chastised for expressing herself -- in her outspoken wit, bookish hobbies and anatomically accurate drawings. Who needs an aunt that banishes you or a long-lost uncle you have never heard of? Along her harrowing journey, Jane gathers deep friends and reliable allies by remaining true to her own self. From her boarding school friend Helen Burns (Freya Parks) to the three siblings that take her in when she is literally homeless, she resets her life’s course by the people she chooses to be close to. “You are the family I have longed for,” she says to St. John Rivers (Jamie Bell).

2. Always demand equal respect -- in cash, please. Don’t be fooled into thinking that women’s problems are over now that corsets have been retired. True, we are no longer confined “to making puddings and knitting stockings,” but according to information released by the White House just this week, women still have a long way to go towards gender equality. Women in the U.S. earn only 75 cents to the dollar every man makes. In Jane Eyre, as single-minded as our young heroine is, there is only one thing that ultimately gives her complete independence: a nice chunk of change that lands in her lap via an out-of-the-blue inheritance.

3. Before committing to a love for life, peek inside all those locked closet doors. It’s easy to get cloudy vision when you’re faced with the affections of a hunky man like Mr. Rochester (hot German actor Michael Fassbender). But never forget that your new love has had an entire life before the two of you met, (and in the case of Rochester, an entire wife!). Chances are there is something in his past you need to know about. Ask the hard questions, follow your gut, and if something is nagging you (like, oh, late-night screams from the attic), don’t just ask where they are coming from, demand to be shown for yourself. For, as Jane learns, it’s only with the full truth that you can decide your destiny confidently.

Jane Erye opens in select theaters on March 11.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:38 pm

http://www.movingpicturesnetwork.com/23914/the-faces-of-jane-eyre/

The Faces of Jane Eyre
Added March 9, 2011

Mia Wasikowska is the latest in a long line of talented actresses who have portrayed Charlotte Brontë’s iconic heroine. In this photo gallery, we revisit some of the fine performers who have romanced Rochester.

Mia Wasikowska (2011): On the heels of bringing Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” to Technicolor life in Tim Burton’s reimagining of the classic tale, Mia Wasikowska plays another literary heroine opposite Michael Fassbender’s Rochester in Cary Joji Fukunaga’s latest impassioned adaptation. Photo by Laurie Sparham © 2011 Focus Features
Charlotte Gainsbourg (1996)

Charlotte Gainsbourg (1996): Miramax, which built its brand partly on the power of period movies, put up this Franco Zeffirelli (“Romeo and Juliet”) production in the middle of its most successful decade — both “Emma,” starring Gwyneth Paltrow, and “The English Patient” also came out this year. French actress Charlotte Gainsbourg, whose collaborators have included Michel Gondry, Todd Haynes and Lars von Trier, starred opposite William Hurt. Photo courtesy Ronald Grant Archive
Anna Paquin (1996)

Anna Paquin (1996): Miramax, which built its brand partly on the power of period movies, put up this production in the middle of its most successful decade — both “Emma,” starring Gwyneth Paltrow, and “The English Patient” also came out this year. Anna Paquin followed up her Oscar win for “The Piano” by playing the heroine as a young girl. Photo courtesy Ronald Grant Archive
Susannah York (1970)

Susannah York (1970): After its debut in theaters in the United Kingdom, Delbert Mann’s adaptation played on television Stateside and won an Emmy for John Williams’ score. Susannah York, who was nominated for an Oscar for her role in “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” and played Superman’s biological mom, starred opposite George C. Scott. Photo courtesy Ronald Grant Archive
Joan Fontaine (1944)

Joan Fontaine (1944): The only actress to win an Oscar for a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Joan Fontaine (“Suspicion”) starred opposite another legendary filmmaker, Orson Welles, in this remake based on a radio adaptation by Welles’ “Mercury Theatre on the Air” under the direction of Robert Stevenson, who later helmed such Disney classics as “Mary Poppins.” Photo courtesy Ronald Grant Archive
Virginia Bruce (1934)

Virginia Bruce (1934): The first talkie version of the novel starred blonde Virginia Bruce, who two years later crooned Cole Porter’s “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” to Jimmy Stewart in “Born to Dance” and starred as a character based on Florenz Ziegfeld Jr.’s mistress in “The Great Ziegfeld.” Colin Clive was her Rochester; prolific director Christy Cabanne helmed.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:05 pm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/patricia-zohn/culture-zohn-jane-eyre-a-_b_833124.html

CultureZohn: Jane Eyre, a Heroine for the Ages

Another version of Jane Eyre is an occasion for celebration, both an opportunity to revisit the previous versions and even more delightfully, the complicated, romantic novel by Charlotte Bronte that is their dramatic underpinning. What an excellent reminder that certain historical heroines deliver the goods to us as much as any modern girls: Bronte could have pitched her story as Teach, Pray, Love.

Did the world need another iteration of Jane Eyre? There has been one almost every decade along with radio and stage plays. As a result, there is probably no orphan more famous than Jane except perhaps David Copperfield. Netflix lists no less than 8 available versions. (See also the wonderful site Enthusiasts Guide to Jane Eyre.) In addition, Jane has been perpetually picked over by critics, feminist scholars and academics even as she is held close by millions of readers.

Almost everyone who comes to know Jane identifies with some aspect of her tortured journey to womanhood, even if by degree. After a childhood of emotional and physical deprivation, thinking herself destined for an ascetic life, she develops a huge crush on her (married) boss, gives him up when she learns the truth and casts herself out into the world, impoverished. But her scrappiness, learned early and well, serves her and she is rescued by a family who turn out to be long lost cousins and with whom she shares a love of literature and religion. Her cousin proposes marriage and joining him as a missionary as she is so suitable, but Jane cannot give up her tormented ghost and journeys to be by his side, only to learn that he has become a blind widower who is now free to marry her after all.

A neglected orphan, Jane is feisty and knows her own self at the outset. She is willing to do verbal and emotional battle with her abusive aunt, do physical battle with her cousins, fall madly in love, resist temptation, fulfill her curiosity, take charge of her career. She understands children. She is natural, as opposed to flighty and vain, intellectual and educated, poor, forced to rely on her wits.

The new version starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, directed by Cary Fukunaga, did not in any way usurp my affection for the 1944 Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine version in whose credit roll I found not only Aldous Huxley (co-screenwriter) but Bernard Herrmann (music) and William Pereira (set design, also architect of the LA County Museum of Art and the Transamerica Tower in San Francisco) and Elizabeth Taylor in a small role as Helen, Jane's Lowood Orphanage best friend. Fontaine played Jane with a soupcon of Joan of Arc, with an ethereal, other-worldly quality and Welles is the Byronic bad boy, the camera and lighting lingering on their tormented eyes. The back lot of Fox and the chiaroscuro of the black and white are even more gothic and frightening than the successively more realistic location versions that have emerged (e.g. when he asks her to marry him, a thunderbolt cracks the tree next to them wide open).

There is compression in all of the films (the Masterpiece Theater and BBC mini series more faithful to the book) but the pivotal scenes remain the same: Jane is accused (falsely) of being a naughty, wicked liar. She has the presence of mind to stand firm in denying these accusations but is banished to Lowood by her harsh Aunt, is forced by Brocklehurst to stand on a stool in ignominy, her saintly best friend Helen dies of consumption next to her in bed, she gets a position at Thornfield, Grace Poole protects a mysterious creature, Jane and Rochester bond, Jane flees learning of Bertha's existence at her wedding, Jane returns to Thornfield to find the house in ashes, Bertha dead, Rochester blind, and reader, she marries him. Often the chapter about her stay with her cousins and her religious agonies is cut or glossed over, though not in this current version which attempts to stay truer to Bronte's concerns.

The Janes have upper lips ranging from full to very full. The Rochesters, eyebrows more or less brooding, both appealing in spite of Bronte's original determination to make both Jane and Rochester unattractive to everyone but each other.

Bronte makes the point that love is made up equally of physical passion and a meeting of minds, which in the Victorian era was a somewhat radical notion. Rochester finds in Jane a respite from the socialites he is mostly lumped with; they like to talk to each other. But he warns her of her inexperience:

"You will come some day to a craggy pass of the channel where the whole of life's stream will be broken up into whirl and tumult foam and noise: either you will be dashed to atoms... or lifted up... by some master wave into a calmer current."

Jane leaps into love with abandon anyway, at first thinking at first she has him in the palm of her hand:

I knew the pleasure of vexing and soothing him by turns... beyond the verge of provocation I never ventured... I liked well to try my skill... I could meet him in argument without fear...

She soon enough learns that he is her equal in resisting love, even (confessing later) by inviting the beautiful and imposing neighboring fortune hunter Miss Ingram just to make her jealous. Normally very much on guard to not let her desire get the best of her, Jane chides herself for her self-delusion:

"That a greater fool than Jane Eyre had never breathed the breath of life: that a more fantastic idiot had never surfeited herself on sweet lies and swallowed poison as if it were nectar."

Bronte may have been sexually repressed, as some critics would have it, but she insisted that Jane be plain -- and that she could still be interesting. Her rival is at first feared for her beauty and wit and talent. But eventually Jane realizes:

"She could not charm him. To watch Miss Ingram's efforts at fascinating Mr. Rochester; to witness their repeated failure...vainly fancying that each shaft launched hit the mark.... that continually glanced off from Mr. Rochester's breast and fell harmless at his feet might, I knew if shot by a surer hand have quivered keen in his proud heart."

But when she finally learns Rochester's truth, she hesitates for only a moment:

"Meantime, let me ask myself one question-which is better? To have surrendered to temptation; listened to passion; made no painful effort... among the luxuries of a pleasure-villa; to have been now living in France, Mr. Rochester's mistress; delirious with his love... Whether it is better...to be a slave in a fool's paradise... or to be a village school mistress, free and honest in... the healthy heart of England."

Jane thinks it's God who has directed her to the right choice. Finally, she is rewarded for not straying, her fatal attraction landing her in a heap until she is finally able to consecrate it and have babies:

"I hold myself supremely blest... because I am my husband's life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am: ever more absolutely bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh."

Bronte, a clergyman's daughter, held fast to her religious faith in spite of its obvious disconnect from the passionate love she also wished for. She and her equally talented siblings (Emily: Wuthering Heights, Anne: The Tenant of Wildfell Hall) invented worlds of their own fabulous construction while living harsh, ascetic lives in stark Yorkshire and then ended up writing gothic-inflected novels about obsessive love. All of them eventually died of TB, brother Branwell already dissipated by opium and alcohol and a failed career as portrait painter.

France and the french are held up as everything wicked, naturellement, Rochester's former mistress, Cecile, as beautiful and faithless and not very smart, Adele her daughter as equally vapid if endearing. Bronte had in fact fallen madly in love with her married mentor in Brussels where she was studying french. Eager for male approval, as she finally geared up to write, Bronte wrote to England's poet laureate of the time for advice. He did not hesitate to warn her that literature should not be:

"The business of a woman's life... the more she is engaged in her proper duties... the less eager [she will be] for celebrity."

Mistress or Schoolmistress? I venture that many of us would have run happily off with Rochester to the south of France. Jean Rhys's novel Wide Saragasso Sea imagines the preamble to Jane Eyre; it's even more fun to imagine what might have become of Jane had she chosen to accompany him. This commingling of sex and smarts although wildly unconventional was not entirely unknown in London literary circles at the time: George Eliot (Marian Evans), Bronte's contemporary, was living out of wedlock with George Henry Lewis. But Eyre was out of touch with this "faster" world.

Jane is bold and the agent of her own destiny yet the catalyst for her actions is love, or want of affection. Still, the pleasure of rooting for such a heroine cannot be underestimated. Jane heads the list of heroines who have a rebellious nature -- one which also includes Scarlett (Gone with the Wind), Patricia (Breathless), Diana (Darling) Erica, (Unmarried Woman), Victoria (Red Shoes), Catherine (Jules and Jim) and others who linger in our memory.

In a pinch, we might ask ourselves, What would Jane do?

It's women's history month: tap into your inner Jane, a heroine for the ages.

Jane Eyre opens nation-wide on March 11th. The previous versions are available on Netflix and the novel on Amazon as well as at your local library.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 6:05 pm

http://www.guttersnipenews.com/features/homepage-features/jane-eyre-new-movie/

Jane Eyre
Posted on March 10, 2011 by Shawn C.

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre (2011).
How will Mia Wasikowska fare against Jane Eyres of the past?

- by Regan Payne

“How did we ever find ourselves trapped in Victorian ladyhood?” he asked, a wee sheepishly.

Let it be said, then, that there is no truth to the viscous, studio-slandering cliché that there are no good roles for women. There are, in fact, two: Jane Eyre and <insert Jane Austen character> here.

I jest, of course. Yet remarkably, somehow the powerbrokers and keepers of the mighty status quo in Hollywood seem to isolate women further with each passing film year. There are indeed very few great roles for women. But why is that? The presence of yet another adaptation of Jane Eyre this Friday proves that enduring female-scribed entertainments, prominently featuring women in the title roles can, and are funded by the very same autocrats running the studios. So, what gives?

When Brontë wrote Eyre, she did so under a pen name (Currer Bell), one would assume so publishers would think her male and treat her manuscript with the respect it deserved. A sad reality of her times, but with so few female writers in the movie business, it begs the question: are things so much different today?

This edition of Jane Eyre, circa 2011, stars Alice from Wonderland, Mia Wasikowska, a fine choice for the orphaned Jane pining for Mr. Rochester (the talented German actor Michael Fassbender).

Jane absolutely represents one of the plum roles available, and seeing how audiences never tire of the plot, the question is: how will Ms. Wasikowska fare down this particular rabbit hole, compared with Jane Eyres’ of the past?

Joan Fontaine – Jane Eyre, 1944

Charlotte Gainsbourg – Jane Eyre, 1996

A year does not pass without an appearance on the large or small screen of a filmed adaptation of either Austen or Brontë.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:10 pm

http://manicpixiefashion.blogspot.com/2011/03/spring-flick-jane-eyre.html

Wednesday, March 9, 2011
Spring Flick: Jane Eyre

The release date of the newest film adaptation of Jane Eyre is drawing nearer and nearer. I have about as much patience as a fruit fly has strength, so you can imagine how difficult the wait has been to endure. Pardon the formality in my writing, by the way -I just finished doing a project for school. I suppose it does fit with the time period of the film, though. Anyway, TANGENTS! Here are some stills.

Take that in, folks. It's the sweet sex appeal of Michael Fassbender as Edward Rochester.

I'm quite the sucker for period pieces, and especially the costumes. While the wardrobe in Jane Eyre will be less decadent than Marie Antoinette was, I look forward to a visual feast that will hopefully emphasize the story.

I know that past interpretations of Jane Eyre have been light and lulling, so I am happily anticipating a more dark, dramatic, intense portrayal of Charlotte Bronte's novel. The movie hits theatres this Friday -cue high-pitched screeches of joy!
Posted by ManicPixieDreamGirl at 3:46 AM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:20 am

http://rusty-sarcasm.blogspot.com/2011/03/jane-eyre-reasons-to-watchcringe.html

March 07, 2011
JANE EYRE: REASONS TO WATCH/CRINGE
7:12 AM Posted by Heather

I know dear reader, you're about ready to toss this blog out with all the Jane Eyre related news I've been posting, and while I could promise that it will stop, I'd be lying. And now, even worse, I'm actually going to write a blog about it too. Without further ado, because there's just too much ado about this movie as it is, here are my top 5 reasons to be excited for the new Jane Eyre. And a few not so much.

5. A St.John Rivers we can actually, possibly, enjoy
This cannot be a point thrown away. Has there ever been a St.John Rivers we actually like (and no, Rupert Penry-Jones from that horrible Crian Hinds version does not count. He was the ONLY good part of THAT movie)? In the novel St.John is a huge, pivotal part in seeing Jane's growth, and likewise his value is based on his close connection to his sisters more than himself independently. In film, he becomes a throw-away bit part that must be there for Jane to return to Rochester. Jamie Bell, however, has this amazing power to take a small part and turn it into something brilliant. He's done it many times before, and made his characters some of the most enduring parts of a whole miniseries. I have a mad, desperate hope that maybe, just maybe, we'll get a proper St.John Rivers this time around.

4. Age-appropriate actors
Considering everything, this should be the least of my issues with an adaptation, but lets remember, 2 of the most iconic BBC versions cast actresses over the age of 25 to play an 18 year old. While the 2006 version finally cast closer to age, the 2011 film hits the nail on the head. I can never again use the argument, "well, if they would just cast ages right we'd see the proper dynamic."

3. An artfully crafted, visual version
In recent years there has only been 1 feature length Jane Eyre: Zeffirelli's 1996 adaptation, and while many of the BBC adaptations are beautiful, there is something to be said about a big-budget, visual movie. Based on the photos we've seen and the clips released (this one in particular), I think we can certainly expect a film visually beautiful. Not Bright Star beautiful, but something sweepingly lovely, capturing the tone of mystery, darkness, and isolation often overlooked or overstated in other versions.

2. We all have our "collections"; I collect Jane Eyres
Friends, loyalties, and unflattering hairstyles are forged based on the adaptations we first see and how we compare all others to it. For me, I will always have a soft spot for Timothy Dalton as Rochester because he, for all intensive purposes, was my first Rochester. Since that first watch, I've collected versions of Jane Eyre--paperback, hardback, mini-series, feature film, and of course musical--voraciously. I have my favorite scenes from all, I've cut and pasted my perfect version a thousand times, and the new Jane Eyre will only add fuel to my favorite fire.

1. A new interpretation to our favorite characters
Sometimes the most interesting part of a new adaptation is hearing how the actors see their characters; especially the men playing Rochester. Toby Stephens had an almost whimsical take on Rochester, stating that in the novel he never shuts up and always enjoys a good long tale. Michael Fassbender, in his first interview about the role, discusses Rochester's inner fears, his changeability, and his relationship with Jane. As a literature girl, I LOVE hearing this stuff: how other people see such an iconic character; they are things we sometimes overlook in our favorite books because we are too in love with other parts to notice.

This being said, I'm nearly positive Fassbender will not play Rochester as a straight Byronic character. If he did that, he'd be repeating his performance in HEX. I'm confident is saying we'll see something in this new Rochester we've never seen before.

With the good, they're might be a little ugly too: a few reasons I'll be gnashing my teeth in the theatre:

The Return of the Known-by-Rochester
Adaptations, when there are many, are mostly distinguished by one trait. With Jane Eyre, its who plays Rochester. This all beautifully changed in 2006 when Ruth Wilson gave a breathtaking performance of Jane against Stephen's own strong portrayal of Rochester. I fear, however, that the glory days are soon to be gone. With this 2011 adaption we will return to distinguishing Jane Eyres, not by their heroine, but by their Byronic hero again. I've enjoyed our brief period of girl power and will be sad to see it go.

More passionless Proposals
Hearing Bronte's proposal scene intact, at one time, made my life. Dialogue loyalty is heady for any book geek, however, those words in entirety are meant not as an extreme expression of passionate emotion, but as a rational argument against social normatives. In the novel, Bronte is using that scene and Jane's words to highlight gender equality through reason and logic: Jane is the rational one, while Rochester the emotional one. The scene is long, and when the words are chopped for an adaption they become awkward and forced. Actors fumble over complex sentences while trying to be passionate and it all just falls flat. Likewise, using a thesaurus to change words in the dialogue for no good reason, helps no one.

Sandy Welch, screenwriter for the 2006 version, knew this undoubtedly and wrote accordingly. Her screenplay kept the best parts of the proposal, allowing the actors to say with emotions the words that were not said. And then of course, Wilson played it beautifully: if Jane is laying everything on the table, she should be crying and angry and visibly shaken. We cannot have a rational Jane when all the rational argument has been cut, just as we cannot have an emotional Jane tied down by an argumentative diatribe. I think we've seen the 2011 version did not learn from Welch's screenplay, and I will cringe in the movie theatre all over again when it is played.

Pacing, we after all only have 2 hours here
2 hours. I'm just saying, I hope there will be a director's cut.

All things considered, I'm still completely up in the air if I will love or hate this version, but the last thing I want is to be apathetic about it. I'm still hopeful though, and that's the best thing to be.

Jane Eyre releases March 11, 2011 with a PG-13 rating.
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:26 am

http://beckwithroad.blogspot.com/2011/03/jane-eyre.html

Friday, March 4, 2011
Jane Eyre

Aproximately 24 adaptations or so later along comes this current, 2011 version of "Jane Eyre"~one of our all time favorite movies! Charlotte Bronte, one of the 3 Bronte sisters of English literature fame wrote Jane Eyre. To date our favorite rendition is acted by Samantha Morton and Ciaran Hinds...they were amazing! So our fingers are crossed and hoping for equally stellar performances for this new version.

Mia Wasikouska and Michael Fassbender star in this Focus Film feature that is directed by Cary Fukunagas.

Haunting and enchanting!

Jane as a young girl

There are some bumps in the road along the way!

We love british actress Sally Hawkins
who's perfectly cast along with Dame Judi Dench.

Counting the days, the hours, the minutes.....

The scenery is riveting...we'll be there just as soon as this film opens in our area. March 11, 2011 can't come soon enough!

Posted by Beckwith Road at 1:12 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:32 am

http://stuffninfo.blogspot.com/2011/03/you-look-so-so-stoopud.html

Saturday, March 5, 2011
You look so ... so .... stoopud.
I read a comment on a blog one time about Jane Eyre, where the poster said something to the effect of, What's not to like about a story where two ugly people get together?

Indeed.

I'm sure I've written a review of Jane Eyre before, I just don't remember when or where. It might have even been on my blog. Perhaps the old blog that I deleted a few years ago. However, as many reviews as I've already written (in theory), I am going to write another one. Haters should stop reading here, because Jane Eyre is still my favorite book.

It must be admitted that I loved Jane Eyre at the age of fourteen because it was the first literary romance I ever read. I knew nothing of the story—nothing. A local bookstore was closing, and my parents were of the opinion that bookstores and libraries were capital places to spend Family Home Evening. I was perusing, and my mother held up a copy of the book that was to change my life forever. A Puffin Classic, with a purple cover and a picture of a rather gothic-looking mansion and a long-dressed, bonnet-clad girl in front of it. And stormy skies behind. Who could resist?

Well, probably a lot of people could have, but not this budding literary, sentimental mind of mine.

I took it home and proceeded to stay up all night reading it. Thus, the creation of a very bad habit I have yet to break ...

It was just so good. I got caught up in the suspense, not being of that class of people who figure out the ending of a story five minutes in and then just complain of its predictability throughout the rest of it. I suppose the story is pretty predictable, knowing what I know now and having read the book about twelve times.

What does predictability matter, though, when the story is full of such overblown passion? I didn't catch any of the allusions, as I was still largely unaware of them as literary devices in the first place. But it is peppered with talk of the most exciting stories from the Bible, from Greek myth, from Persian literature, and Shakespeare, and ancient history, and science, and folklore. Even at fourteen, I sensed class, even if I couldn't identify it.

So I've discussed in a little too much depth what I thought of it at fourteen. How do I justify cherishing such a passion for this washed-out, over-adapted piece of melodrama?

It's all in the characters, of course. As a reader is meant to, I identify with Jane. Not with being "poor, obscure, plain, and little" because I'm not exactly that, but with feeling a constant battle between what I ought to do and what I want to do. At one point, Rochester said Jane "mutinied against fate"—what an interesting concept. So many stories are built upon the idea of an inescapable fate, and it seems that Charlotte Brontë's entire aim was to prove that there is no such thing, and that fate and religion (or, in Victorian vernacular, "divine providence") are impossible to reconcile. Adherence to the laws of God frees the human soul from any oppressive fate a person might feel bound to.

What a character Rochester is. (On a side note, I am now dying to see the new movie. I used to think Toby Stephens was the most fabulous casting choice anyone could have made, but when I read the part where Jane is at Gateshead and lonely and bored and starts to sketch Rochester's face, she actually described none other than Michael Fassbender. I wonder if he'll be any good.) He's such a moral mess, but he somehow makes you like him anyway, because he never tries to hide the fact that he had a succession of three very wicked relationships with very stupid women; and he saw through the superficial pride and arrogance of people like Blanche Ingram. He always had good intentions—he was just too romantic and impulsive and gregarious to go without. It's interesting how little is said about his youth, etc. but you get the impression that he was very spoiled. He is, and he never forgets it. What I really like the best about him is that he is always willing to admit when he is wrong, and willing to make amends to people when he hurts them. I think his feelings and behavior towards Adèle made an impression on Jane—his insistence that the right thing to do would be to take responsibility for her and do what he could to make her happy and healthy, in spite of his dislike of her and his distaste for the memories she invokes. It is a stark contrast to how Jane's aunt Reed treated her when she was an unwanted, friendless orphan.

As for the much-neglected St. John Rivers, I had some very interesting insights as I read about him this time. I wonder—Jane decided that it would be just as wicked to counterfeit romantic love in order to marry someone for reasons of propriety as it would be to counterfeit marriage in order to have a romantic relationship. And St. John was much more manipulative than Rochester was; he would have married her so she could be part of his own glory and ambition, rather than for the honest belief that she would be happy with him. He used every trick in the book to get her to bend to his will, from playing on her insecurities about her personal appearance, to passive-aggressive silence, to twisting her own words to imply a promise she had not really given, to forceful, almost physically violent entreaty. Compared to him, Rochester really is kind and sweet. People are fascinating. I could imagine meeting people like that.

I could keep going, but I think I've written quite enough for the present. I'm glad, though, that I read it again and could rediscover its genius.
Posted by stuffninfo at 8:07 PM
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 1:31 am

http://www.towleroad.com/2011/03/movies-my-what-big-legacy-you-have.html

Also Opening: Aaron Eckhardt fights aliens in BATTLE: LOS ANGELES with the power of his piercing baby blues, super cleft chin and (presumably) massive fire arms; the nonstop avalanche of animated films continues with MARS NEEDS MOMS; Juliette Binoche is sensational in the intellectually playful and emotionally stunning CERTIFIED COPY; And finally, despite a tiny initial launch, watch for JANE EYRE when it hits a theater near you. The incredible Michael Fassbender broods as Mr. Rochester while Mia Wasikowska swoons in the title role. This, the millionth screen version, is helmed by rising directorial star Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre). It's winning amazing reviews
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Re: Jane Eyre thoughts

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:12 pm

http://www.slate.com/id/2287644/

Up in the Eyre
Why are there so many movie adaptations of Jane Eyre, and which one is best?
By Jessica WinterPosted Thursday, March 10, 2011, at 7:08 AM ET

Also in Slate, Dana Stevens reviews the new Jane Eyre movie.

Jane Eyre. One of many Jane Eyre adaptationsThe most famous line in Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre is "Reader, I married him." Depending on the reader, it may also be the most puzzling, given that I is a wealthy young woman and him is a one-eyed, one-handed, pushing-40 grump who proposes to a nanny half his age only to admit at the altar that he's already got a wife and she's locked in his attic. Dreamy! Yet in a 2009 poll by British romance publisher Mills and Boon, readers voted Edward Rochester the "most popular hero in literature," ahead of the likes of Heathcliff, Rhett Butler, and Colin Firth.

With such an established brand in the public domain, Jane Eyre is reanimated for film and TV with a frequency that belies its resistance to faithful adaptation. Presented as the autobiography of a "plain, Quakerish governess," the novel devotes many chapters to the privation and abuse Jane suffers in childhood and, after her aborted wedding, her sojourn with Calvinist drip St. John Rivers; these sections are hardly the stuff of bonnet-ripping romance. A fan's rainy-day re-readings likely center on the passages set at Rochester's estate, Thornfield, where the master's crypto-courtship techniques include disguising himself as a fortune-telling crone and lots of monologuing in Jane's general direction. In the hands of the wrong actor or director, Jane's integrity and candor might scan as prim saintliness, while her lack of materialism is conduct unbecoming in any Hollywood bride-to-be: "The more [clothing and jewelry] he bought me, the more my cheek burned with a sense of annoyance and degradation." What kind of killjoy wins the marital sweepstakes and refuses a retail victory lap? Or says of her beloved, "I am sure most people would have thought him an ugly man"?
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I am sure most people would not think this of Michael Fassbender, star of the latest Jane Eyre, out this week. Nor is "plain" a word that describes Mia Wasikowska, who plays Jane in Cary Fukunaga's handsome reboot—wherein even the madwoman Bertha Mason (Valentina Cervi) is so artfully disheveled that she brings to mind not syphilitic lunacy so much as the Comme des Garçons' fall 2008 ready-to-wear collection. No matter: The actors are fantastic, and the central challenge of adapting Jane Eyre is more than skin deep. Because Brontë's novel has the internal emotional logic of a brilliant diary, coaxing Rochester out of Jane's forgiving imagination and onto the screen exposes him to harsher judgment—for, say, not looking before he leaps across the gulf of years, social status, and legal impediments to propose to Jane. And for forcing Jane to take a front-row seat at his protracted flirtation with snooty socialite Blanche Ingram. And for, oh yes, imprisoning an actual living human being in the attic the whole time. However much we might adore him—and in the end, don't we love Rochester because we love Jane?—our hero is, objectively speaking, a bit of a creep. Thus the success or failure of any Jane Eyre (the below list is a mere sampling) hinges on how well the film minimizes its inevitable Creep Factor.

Players: Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles (1943)
Creep Factor: High

Co-scripted by Aldous Huxley, this early adaptation of Jane Eyre unspools like a horror movie, all looming Gothic towers, slanting shadows, and bursts of orchestral bang-crash. The big proposal scene smacks of hypnosis and brute force, and after a while you wonder if Rochester's dark secret is that he's the Wolfman. (For superior Eyre-inspired frighteners of the same era, check out Hitchcock's Rebecca and Jacques Tourneur's I Walked with a Zombie.) Fontaine purées Jane's dignity and stoicism into patrician blandness, and while Welles is an interesting choice for Rochester—arrogance and self-pity were often his team colors—here he's a cardboard golem in a riding cloak, leaving trails of dry ice and bronzer in his wake. When J&R reunite for their happy-ever-after, one feels the same stirrings of heebie-jeebies aroused by the finale of As Good As It Gets.
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Players: Susannah York and George C. Scott (1970)
Creep Factor: N/A

Jane Eyre is tricky to cast because its central match is—at least to the naked eye—a mismatch of age, station, and temperament. Which can create a paradox: If J&R click too readily, the whole contraption falls apart. York was 30 when she portrayed the virginal Jane opposite 44-year-old Scott, and though his gifts for manic intensity and prosecutorial zeal suggest Rochester DNA, the pairing is cozy and domestic enough to evoke not socially proscribed kismet but rather a couple of battle-scarred divorcés saying, What the heck, let's make a go of it!

Players: Zelah Clarke and Timothy Dalton (1983)
Creep Factor: Minimal

Clarke is a shade delicate and wheedling for Jane, but the pre-007 Dalton is a pitch-perfect Rochester: gruff, vulnerable, congenitally infuriated. He also bears such a ridiculously uncanny resemblance to Jon Hamm—I mean, just look at this—that rediscovering this BBC serial suddenly casts a gloomy mist of Yorkshire romance over Mad Men: Don Draper is Rochester, the impulsive himbo with a sordid past; Peggy Olson is Jane, the resilient go-getter and rock-solid feminist; Betty Draper is the scary wife locked in the attic, etc.

Players: Charlotte Gainsbourg and William Hurt (1996)
Creep factor: Off the charts

More than any other Jane to date, Gainsbourg's seems palpably wounded: scarred but intact, cagey, conserving her every word and movement, bearing a heavy burden of experience and ghastly memories on her thin shoulders. (When she smiles, it's as if she must consciously arrange her facial muscles in the appropriate pattern—her smile has an accent like a language learned too late.) Gainsbourg is, at least to this viewer, Jane incarnate, which makes it doubly disappointing that Hurt clomps through the movie in a floppy Klonopin haze and delivers all his lines with the same eye-rolling, double-chinning sarcasm. For J&R's first embrace, he doesn't kiss her so much as lay his face on hers. One longs to spirit Gainsbourg-Jane off to Paris, where she will pioneer the trendsetting governess chic and become an early patron of Jeanne Lanvin.

Players: Samantha Morton and Ciarán Hinds (1997)
Creep factor: High

The '90s were not a good time for Jane Eyre. Morton somehow manages to make Jane smug in this threadbare A&E production, spinning the character's profound self-possession as a twinkly-eyed superiority; she always seems on the verge of giggles. She treats her man with moony condescension, which is apt—Hinds' Rochester is a honking lech, blustering and bloviating beneath the carpet swatches on his face as if he's auditioning for the Alfred Molina role in Boogie Nights.
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Players: Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens (2006)
Creep factor: None

Should the BBC receive indefinite custody of Jane Eyre? This four-hour adaptation is luscious, patient, and features a jaw-dropping proposal scene that all but shudders with swoony catharsis. Stephens has the airs and pedigree (he's the son of Dame Maggie Smith) for the upper-crust Rochester, whom he plays as shifty yet sweet, brusque yet painfully self-aware. With her rubbery features, stern slanting eyebrows, kind eyes, and resolute overbite, Wilson is gorgeous without being conventionally "pretty," and she lends her character the swagger of a tomboy: This Jane is bolder, less remote, more robust, more butch than we're used to—more explicitly a protofeminist hero, and on equal footing with her moody bastard of a mate. She is, in short, a Jane we've never met before but one we feel we know intimately, proving that no matter how many times Brontë's novel might be revived, it's still possible to make it new.
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