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Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:08 pm

http://www.kahunas.co.uk/media/2010/02/adventures-in-burtons-wonderland/

Adventures in Burton’s Wonderland
by admin
Posted February 7th, 2010 at 4:56 pm

Mia Wasikowska talks to Alice Fisher about the pitfalls of playing a much-loved character and the pressures of sudden Hollywood fame

Tim Burton’s adaptation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is one of the most highly awaited films of the year, with each fresh video clip of Johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter and poster of Helena Bonham Carter’s nightmarish Red Queen sending fans into ecstasies. No one is more surprised by these tasters than the film’s star, Mia Wasikowska, who plays the 19-year-old Alice on a return trip to Wonderland. “I see these posters and dolls at the same time as everybody else, which is kind of bizarre,” she says. “It feels really weird seeing me on a movie poster.”

Her bemusement is understandable – Wasikowska is pretty new to being a film star. The 20-year-old Australian spent her childhood in Canberra with her brother, sister and parents (who are both photographers and artists – her surname comes courtesy of her Polish-born mother). She says that until five years ago she knew nothing about the film industry. “I was at dance school doing about 35 hours practice a week until I was 14. Then ballet started to grate – the whole idea of trying to attain perfection started to ruin the experience, so I decided to try another type of performance.”

She signed with a Sydney agent and parts in Australian TV and film soon followed. Her first job in America was a stunning turn as a suicidal gymnast on TV pyschoanalysis drama In Treatment (shown on Sky Arts in the UK last year). Film roles as a strong-willed Jewish girl in Second World War thriller Defiance (2008) and as pioneer aviator Elinor Smith in the Amelia Earhart biopic with Hilary Swank came next. “I’m really happy with the roles I played,” says Wasikowska. “I never identified with teen films – they pigeonhole the teenage experience – but I felt a connection with the young women that I’ve played. I’ve been honoured to portray such intelligent and sophisticated roles.”

And will her Alice be just as complex? “There’s a certain amount of anxiety that comes with playing a character so beloved by so many people,” she admits. But Wasikowska worked hard with Burton to make sure Alice felt like their own. She is, of course, a huge fan of the director’s work, particularly The Corpse Bride and Ed Wood: “All of his films are so beautiful, works of art in their own right.”

Wasikowska has a couple of plum roles lined up after that, enough to see her included on the annual Vanity Fair young Hollywood talent cover this month, alongside Kristen Stewart and Carey Mulligan. Playing Jane Eyre to Michael Fassbender’s Rochester looms on the horizon and she’s just finished shooting director Gus Van Sant’s latest (and as yet untitled) film with Henry Hopper, Dennis’s son, and Sissy Spacek’s daughter, Schuyler Fisk. “Van Sant is fantastic. I felt so liberated on set because I was encouraged to act like a young person He wanted me to have fun and be myself; it felt like I was in college.”

Wasikowska seems a little forlorn when she explains how her sudden Hollywood success has meant she’s seen little of Canberra of late. “It was harder when I was younger, being in a position where I had to be independent at a time when you very much want to be with your family.” But she sounds a little like Alice when she adds: “But whenever I’m not working I go straight home – back to reality.


Last edited by greyeyegoddess on Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:17 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:09 pm

http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/entertainment/entertainment/view/20100305-256841/Newcomer-goes-from-Alice-to-Jane-Eyre

Only in Hollywood
Newcomer goes from Alice to Jane Eyre

By Ruben V. Nepales
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 17:54:00 03/05/2010

LOS ANGELES—Mia Wasikowska (pronounced “Vah-she-kov-ska”) made a splash as the virtually unknown girl who got the plum title role in Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland.” Yet, here she is, creating more headlines—by bagging the part of the eponymous heroine in the new film version of “Jane Eyre.”

“We begin shooting ‘Jane Eyre’ in March,” announced Mia, who arrived for this interview in a stunning short hairdo. The pixie cut adds a fresh, youthful appeal to Mia, who reminds us of Gwyneth Paltrow and Cate Blanchett. We’re beginning to suspect there’s a factory somewhere in the Outback that’s churning out good Aussie thespians for export to the world.

Speaking in a quiet tone, the girl who first gained attention as the suicidal teenager in HBO’s “In Treatment” elaborates on the umpteenth big-screen version of Emily Bronte’s classic Gothic tale. Cary Fukunaga, who directed “Sin Nombre,” last year’s acclaimed indie film about the harsh realities faced by would-be US illegal immigrants, helms the movie with Michael Fassbender as the tortured Rochester.

Wonderful choice

“It’s faithful to the book, but I think Cary is a wonderful choice as the director,” Mia shared. “He’s not an obvious choice, so he’s going to bring some exciting energy to the movie. I can’t wait to discover for myself what he’s going to do with it!”

Of landing the role of Alice, the 20-year-old admitted, “I never expected to get the part. I’m not usually the person who gets these roles. It was a long process of auditioning.”

Calm and modest, Mia credits her family and upbringing in her native Canberra for giving her a solid background. She likes to say that all this newfound fame fades in the background when she’s back with her family in Australia. So, working with Tim and Johnny Depp (as the Mad Hatter), Helena Bonham-Carter and Anne Hathaway was a completely new experience for her.

“No, it definitely was not normal,” she remarked with a wistful smile. “You try to not get too overwhelmed by them. But, on the first day, to walk into the set and see people whose work I admire was surreal. Johnny was pretty much disguised as the Mad Hatter. It was almost a shock when I saw him out of his costume. It was like, ‘Oh, that is who’s behind all of that.’”

Mia offered succinct comments on what she picked up from working with the A-list pros: “I learned how they take ownership of what they do, especially Johnny. He makes very brave decisions—and unapologetically. The most interesting actors are the ones who take risks and do something that could potentially fail. But, at least, they’re doing something new and exciting.”

Growing up with parents who are both photographers, Mia was exposed to the arts early on. She trained in ballet from age 9 to 14. “I really loved dance, but when I was 14, it became very much about achieving perfection,” she explained. “At the same time, I was watching a lot of films. I like the contrast between the perfection in dance while in film, we’re able to explore imperfection, and the things that aren’t so perfect become really interesting. So, I started acting when I was 14. I have loved it since.”

From a recurring role in the Aussie soap, “All Saints,” she did several films in her homeland, until she landed the role in “In Treatment.” To this day, she cherishes her part in that acclaimed TV series. “When I was a teenager, I never really identified with the usual teen roles. But, that character was very real to me. Those kinds of characters show the complex lives of young people.”

“I love going to Australia,” added Mia, who has a sister and a brother. “There’s a lot of excitement and hype here, but when I go home, I’m very much a regular young person. That’s where I find joy.”

The passion of her parents for photography has rubbed off on her. “I am into photography,” disclosed the budding star. “I love having a creative outlet that I can control, because in film, you wait until a role comes up.”

Lesbian couple

At the rate she’s being cast in choice projects, Mia is likely to hear the call to go to the set more often. She appears in Lisa Cholodenko’s “The Kids Are Alright,” an acclaimed entry at Sundance last January. Mia plays the daughter of a lesbian couple (Julianne Moore and Annette Bening) who searches for her biological father (Mark Ruffalo).

Last December, Mia wrapped up filming Gus Van Sant’s “Restless.” “I’ve been a fan of Gus for years, so to be able to work with him was special,” she enthused. “He handles adolescence in a very intelligent way. He shows young people as complex beings. It’s a love story about two teenagers who are affected by death. Although it sounds grim, the film is actually very playful. It’s a beautiful story of how, when somebody is right for you, he brings out the best in you. It’s by first-time writer, Jason Lew. And, with Gus, that was another situation that I learned so much from.”

Mia compared all these adventures to those of her character, Alice: “This is a very different world, so the whole experience has been like being in my own Wonderland,” she said with a shy smile.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:13 pm

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/60493,people,entertainment,mia-wasikowska-proves-more-popular-than-alice-in-wonderland-film-tim-burton

Mia Wasikowska proves more popular than Alice
Mia Wasikowska in Alice in Wonderland
Alice in Wonderland’s Australian star is being toasted as the ‘new Gwyneth Paltrow’
By Rachel Helyer Donaldson
LAST UPDATED 3:58 PM, MARCH 5, 2010

Mia Wasikowska, the star of Alice in Wonderland, is the latest in a long line of Australian actresses to conquer Hollywood. Critics may be divided over Tim Burton's 3D spin on the Lewis Carroll classic, but they are almost unanimous in their praise Wasikowska's performance as the film's eponymous heroine.

The Hollywood Reporter's Michael Rechtshaffen described Wasikowska's performance as "pitch-perfect" while more than one reviewer - including the Guardian's Xan Brooks and Variety's Todd McCarthy - have noted Wasikowska's similarity to Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow, arguably one of the best actresses of her generation.

McCarthy, who slams Burton's film as disappointingly "ordinary" and "conventional", reserves his praise for Wasikowska. It is not just her "willowy, Gwyneth Paltrowesque beauty", noted McCarthy, but also her acting prowess which has earned her the comparison. "[She has] a pale but powerful resolve that confers upon the picture any gravity it may possess."

Wasikowska (pronounced Vah-she-kov-ska) was born in Canberra to a Polish photographer mother and an Australian artist father. After training as a ballet dancer, she switched to acting, getting her first major break in the the Australian medical drama series All Saints.

But the actress came to Hollywood's attention three years ago when she landed a regular part in the HBO series In Treatment, starring opposite Gabriel Byrne (who plays the show's psychotherapist). Wasikowska was just 17 when she played Sophie, a suicidal teenager who has been raped by her gym teacher.

Burton has said that as he was drawn to the maturity of the young actress when sifting through hundreds of acting CVs for his Alice. "I always like it when I sense people have that 'old soul' quality to them," he says. "Because you’re witnessing this whole thing through her eyes, it needed somebody who can subtly portray that."

One blip in the good reviews came last weekend when Wasikowska found herself at the receiving end of a bizarre rant by News of the World's film critic Robbie Collin. The Australian media was abuzz with the news that the "Aussie Alice" had been savaged in a one-star review in which Collin described Wasikowska as having all the warmth "of a refrigerated trout, and a face you'd expect to see Blu-Tacked to the inside of a London phone box". He went on: "She's not a heroine - she looks like she's ON heroin."

But Wasikowska hardly needs to be troubled by Collin's uncharitable views. Since finishing Burton's movie, she has already shot another film, Restless, directed by Gus Van Sant, and is to take the starring role in the new version of Jane Eyre, with Michael Fassbender as Mr Rochester. The Aussie Alice's adventures in Hollywood continue.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:16 pm

http://www.smh.com.au/news/entertainment/film/mia-wasikowska-our-falling-star/2010/03/04/1267291920372.html

Mia Wasikowska: Our falling star

Kelsey Munroe
March 5, 2010

Canberra girl ... Mia Wasikowska grew up with a more obscure version of Alice.

Photo: Marco del Grande
It's no wonder Mia Wasikowska enjoyed working as the lead character with Johnny Depp on Tim Burton's 3D fantasy movie Alice in Wonderland. When she wasn't filming scenes with Depp as the Mad Hatter and the other human actors, the Australian actress spent three months of the shoot on a floor-to-ceiling green screen set. Not much competition.

"All the time that I'm acting with an animated character, I'm looking at a tennis ball or sticky tape or an eyeline or a man in a green suit," Wasikowska says. "There's no real environment, just this electric green that's blaring into your brain. But you just have to use your imagination more to [picture] what's going on around you."

Scoring the role of Alice was a life-changing coup for the 20-year-old Australian, who was relatively unknown here (apart from roles in soap All Saints and film Suburban Mayhem) but had more recently earned plaudits in the US playing a suicidal teen in HBO series In Treatment. Her profile looks set to rise further: in her next film she stars as Jane Eyre with Michael Fassbender's Rochester in a film adaptation of the classic Charlotte Bronte book.

Eccentric English director Burton (think The Nightmare Before Christmas, Sleepy Hollow and Corpse Bride) has carved out his own distinct cinematic world where fairytales are gleefully dark and twisted with the help of his dual muses, his wife, English actress Helena Bonham Carter (who plays the Red Queen in Alice), and actor Depp.

The classic Lewis Carroll tome provided perfect fodder for Burton's imagination, although the film's story is an update on the book. Alice is now 19 and about to have her engagement to a man she is unwilling to marry announced at a party promoted by his family. After being put on the spot by the proposal, she spots a white rabbit and begins chasing it before giving her answer.

Alice finds herself falling down the rabbit burrow she had first tripped into as a child. On landing in Wonderland, Alice soon discovers all is not wonderful. The Red Queen, after declaring war on her younger sister the White Queen (Anne Hathaway), has wreaked havoc on the land and its inhabitants with the help of a magical dragon and her army. Alice finds herself a fugitive from the Red Queen's forces before visiting the Mad Hatter at a tea party, joining the resistance he is a part of and, ultimately, facing the Red Queen.

"It's really a coming-of-age adventure - Alice finding herself again," Wasikowska says. "She's at that time of her life I think a lot of young people go through, where suddenly you're 19 and you're an adult and you have all these expectations on you, either from society or your family, to be something ... Then how much do you sacrifice yourself to please other people and how much do you want to hold on to what you want to do to be happy?"

Wasikowska grew up familiar with an altogether darker and more obscure version of Alice: a stop-motion film created by Czech director Jan Svankmajer. ("My mum used to show us when we were kids. It was dark and disturbing but we could never walk away because it was so compelling.")

Raised in Canberra, Wasikowska is the middle child of two photographers who supported her creative endeavours.

"I had done dance very intensely for a number of years. I absolutely loved it and always thought I would do that for my career but it became so much about achieving physical perfection and I just started being so negative - your self-esteem can just plummet ... then, when I started to become interested in film, what I loved about it was all the imperfections. It was about things that are imperfect, or things we do that aren't perfect."

Wasikowska is living out of a suitcase for the global publicity blitz behind Alice, reportedly a $250 million movie.

Working with heavyweights such as Burton and Depp wasn't intimidating, she says.

"They made it very easy for me, very comfortable. They bounce off each other creatively and have a real push-pull thing. They complement each other in all the right areas."

For Depp she has only praise: "It was so easy to completely forget that he was Johnny Depp and just see him as the character and get lost in that, which was really helpful. He plays these kind of crazy characters but he gives this core humanity and core heart, which is why I think ... they have a kind of gravity to them.

"You end up feeling for them and caring about them. I think that's why he's so genius."

Wasikowska grew up familiar with an altogether darker and more obscure version of Alice: a stop-motion film created by Czech director Jan Svankmajer. ("My mum used to show us when we were kids. It was dark and disturbing but we could never walk away because it was so compelling.")

Raised in Canberra, Wasikowska is the middle child of two photographers who supported her creative endeavours.

"I had done dance very intensely for a number of years. I absolutely loved it and always thought I would do that for my career but it became so much about achieving physical perfection and I just started being so negative - your self-esteem can just plummet ... then, when I started to become interested in film, what I loved about it was all the imperfections. It was about things that are imperfect, or things we do that aren't perfect."

Wasikowska is living out of a suitcase for the global publicity blitz behind Alice, reportedly a $250 million movie.

Working with heavyweights such as Burton and Depp wasn't intimidating, she says.

"They made it very easy for me, very comfortable. They bounce off each other creatively and have a real push-pull thing. They complement each other in all the right areas."

For Depp she has only praise: "It was so easy to completely forget that he was Johnny Depp and just see him as the character and get lost in that, which was really helpful. He plays these kind of crazy characters but he gives this core humanity and core heart, which is why I think ... they have a kind of gravity to them.

"You end up feeling for them and caring about them. I think that's why he's so genius."

* Watch a video interview with Mia Wasikowska at smh.com.au. Read the review in Spectrum tomorrow.

ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3D

Director Tim Burton Stars Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter Rated PG. Screening now.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:19 pm

http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/movies/Mia+Wasikowska-8286.html

Mia Wasikowska On The Way Up

Yesterday 09:53

Mia Wasikowska is making quite a breakthrough this month as she takes the central role in Tim Burton's re-working of Lewis Carroll's classic tale Alice In Wonderland.

The Australian born actress trained in ballet from a young age but turned towards acting in her teenage years.

Like many budding Australian thespians before her she kicked off her career in Aussie TV as she appeared a couple of episodes of All Saints.

It wasn't long before she caught the attention of the Australian film industry and short films such as Lens Love Story and Skin came along.

In 2006 Suburban Mayhem proved to be her breakthrough role in her native country as she went on to be nominated for a Young Actor's AFI Award.

She went on to appear in Rogue with Radha Mitchell before America beckoned as she moved to try and expand her career.

And it was television where she had her biggest success in 2008 with In Treatment. In Treatment was a HBO drama which followed Dr. Paul Weston, a psychotherapist, and his weekly sessions with patients.

She took on the role of Sophie, a suicidal teenage gymnast, the role brought her huge critical praise and it wasn't long before the American studios were signing her up.

Before making Alice In Wonderland a handful of supporting roles came her way, the first coming in the way of Defiance.

The war movie starred Daniel Craig and Liev Schreiber and followed three Jewish brothers in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe who escape into the Belarussian forests.

Here they join Russian resistance fighters and endeavour to build a village in order to protect themselves and about 1,000 Jewish non-combatants.

Mia took on the role of Chaya Dziencielsky, the love interest of Jamie Bell's Asael.

She went on to appear in biopic movie Amelia before finding critical success in That Evening Sun.

The movie, which starred Hal Holbrook, follows an aging Tennessee farmer returns to his homestead and must confront a family betrayal, the reappearance of an old enemy, and the loss of his farm.

For her performance she picked up a Independent Spirit Awards 2009 nominated for Best Supporting Female.

Despite all the success that has gone before Alice In Wonderland looks set to be the role that shoots her to fame.

She joins forces with Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter and Anne Hathaway as nineteen year old Alice who is returning to Wonderland for the first time since she was a child.

And the future looks bright of the actress with a string of projects in the pipeline. The Kids Are All Right, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, sees her star alongside Julianne Moore.

The movie follows the children, led by Mia, of a lesbian couple who want to search for their biological father.

She is also set to take on one of literature's greatest heroines as Jane Eyre is once again adapted for the big screen.

The movie is expected to be released next year and Mia joins an all star cast of Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell and Judi Dench.

There is also an untitled Gus Van Sant, last seen directing Sean Penn in Milk, project on the horizon.

Mia took on the role of Chaya Dziencielsky, the love interest of Jamie Bell's Asael.

She went on to appear in biopic movie Amelia before finding critical success in That Evening Sun.

The movie, which starred Hal Holbrook, follows an aging Tennessee farmer returns to his homestead and must confront a family betrayal, the reappearance of an old enemy, and the loss of his farm.

For her performance she picked up a Independent Spirit Awards 2009 nominated for Best Supporting Female.

Despite all the success that has gone before Alice In Wonderland looks set to be the role that shoots her to fame.

She joins forces with Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter and Anne Hathaway as nineteen year old Alice who is returning to Wonderland for the first time since she was a child.

And the future looks bright of the actress with a string of projects in the pipeline. The Kids Are All Right, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, sees her star alongside Julianne Moore.

The movie follows the children, led by Mia, of a lesbian couple who want to search for their biological father.

She is also set to take on one of literature's greatest heroines as Jane Eyre is once again adapted for the big screen.

The movie is expected to be released next year and Mia joins an all star cast of Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell and Judi Dench.

There is also an untitled Gus Van Sant, last seen directing Sean Penn in Milk, project on the horizon.

Alice In Wonderland is released 5th March

FemaleFirst Helen Earnshaw
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Sun Mar 21, 2010 1:12 am

http://incontention.com/?p=24083

Ubiquitous
Posted by Guy Lodge · 3:24 pm · March 19th, 2010

Mia WasikowskaWhen I heard today that Mia Wasikowska had landed the lead in Cary Fukunaga’s upcoming adaptation of “Jane Eyre” for Focus Features, my first thought was, “Well, who else?”

Not that there aren’t other suitable young actresses who could ace the part. But 20 year-old Australian Wasikowska seems to have hit a sweet spot in the Hollywood casting game. A year ago, few who didn’t watch HBO’s “In Treatment” had heard of her; today, she seems to be nabbing every plum role going in her age bracket.

Two years ago, Ellen Page’s name was linked to this latest dusting-off of the Charlotte Brontë chestnut; the eventual casting of Wasikowska suggests that even young Hollywood has its minute generational shifts.

Not that I’m complaining about Wasikowska’s sudden rise. I was as impressed as everyone else by her tangy work as a suicidal teen in “In Treatment,” and was pleased to see that promise completely followed through with a precise, perceptive turn as the daughter of Annette Bening and Julianne Moore in Lisa Cholodenko’s deserved festival hit “The Kids Are All Right.”

I have yet to see her Spirit-nominated performance in the tiny indie “That Evening Sun,” but on the opposite end of the studio scale, I must give her respect for holding her own in Tim Burton’s lumbering “Alice in Wonderland,” even as the film falls apart around her. If that film’s commercial success sends her career skyward, it’s at least rewarding the right person. Meanwhile, she also has Gus Van Sant’s “Restless” on her docket.

As for “Jane Eyre,” I can’t say Wasikowska’s fair, willowy features are the closest match in my mind for Brontë’s heroine, previously incarnated on screen by the likes of Joan Fontaine and Charlotte Gainsbourg. (I admit I was excited by the earlier choice of Page.) But I’m interested to see what she does for the role — and it for her.

Wasikowska rounds out a well-nigh unimpeachable cast for the film, which begins shooting next week. As we mentioned in our interview with the actor in January, Michael Fassbender takes on the role of Mr. Rochester, while Sally Hawkins, Judi Dench and Jamie Bell are all also on board. If Fukunaga can bring some of the jagged, contemporary spirit of his debut “Sin Nombre” to the table, this should be one to watch
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 16, 2011 4:18 pm

http://www.showbizspy.com/article/226428/mia-wasikowska-has-run-in-with-aroused-horse.html

Wasikowska Has Run-in With Aroused Horse

Wednesday February 16, 2011

aMIA Wasikowska had to put up with an over-excited horse while shooting the new Jane Eyre movie.

The Aussie actress, 21, says she was shocked when a horse she was working with on the classic drama got turned on about being on-screen.

“All I remember is that whenever my costar Michael Fassbender hopped on the horse, it would get a huge erection,” Mia said.

“The poor horse was just…really happy! And they had to keep running him around the block every time Michael hopped on him. So that kind of stalled our day of filming. The thing was just…dangling!

“That was day three. I remember that exactly and always will.”
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 03, 2011 7:13 pm

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704506004576174712632399354.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

* MARCH 4, 2011

For Jane Eyre, the Kid Is All Right

In the latest screen version of Charlotte Brontë's 164-year-old novel "Jane Eyre," 21-year-old Mia Wasikowska plays the title role. The filmmakers had sought a lead actress close in age to the young heroine, part of an effort to freshen a work that's been fodder for countless film, TV and stage adaptations. Director Cary Joji Fukunaga ("Sin Nombre") emphasized the story's spooky elements, in some scenes flirting with the horror genre, and screenwriter Moira Buffini reordered the novel's narrative structure, making use of flashbacks to ratchet up the drama.

Co-starring with Michael Fassbender as Edward Rochester, Ms. Wasikowska creates the governess who transcends a lowly station—"poor, obscure, plain and little"—and continues a rapid cinematic rise. After landing in a recurring role in HBO's "In Treatment," last year she appeared in the title role of Tim Burton's box-office smash "Alice in Wonderland," and in the Oscar-nominated "The Kids Are All Right" as a pensive teen who seeks out her sperm-donor father. In her native Australia (where she lives with her parents in Canberra when she's not working), Ms. Wasikowska spent years studying ballet before abandoning dance for the less rigid discipline of acting. Future projects, she says, include films by Gus Van Sant and Park Chan-wook. For the Korean director's "Stoker," Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman are in talks to play her parents.

The Wall Street Journal: The first scene you filmed was Jane fleeing Rochester's Thornfield estate, where you're stumbling and crying and soaking wet. How did you ramp up to that intensity?

Ms. Wasikowska: Ah yes, stumbling through the moors. I think that was day two. That's the thing about films—you can never choose when you do anything. You have to be ready at any moment to turn on a certain emotion. It would suck to do those scenes against a [special effects] green screen. Out there, it was windy and cold and I could at least imagine what it would be like.

Were there passages of the book that especially helped you unlock the character?

By the time I'd finished rereading it I'd underlined pretty much the whole book. From start to finish it's Jane's inner monologue, but the big key to understanding Jane is Rochester. Almost everything he says unlocks who she actually is.

You finished high school through correspondence courses. Was "Jane Eyre" part of your curriculum?

No. I read the book after I'd finished filming "Alice in Wonderland." I made a list of 10 books that I thought were classics and "Jane Eyre" was on that list. I was on the fifth chapter when I emailed my agent to ask if anyone was adapting it. Two months later she sent me the script and I was meeting Cary.

Did you feel it was important to be grounded in how other filmmakers and actresses have portrayed Jane?

I chose not to watch previous versions of the film. Partially because I was overwhelmed by how many there were, plus I didn't want to be influenced by other performances.

What makes Jane contemporary?

She has such a strong sense of self. She doesn't compromise herself. There's something in her that makes her think she's worthy of happiness, and that's really an important thing for young women to remember, especially when they're falling in love.

You were a ballet dancer before switching to acting. What's worse: point shoes or the corsets you wore for this role?

Corsets. There's something about feeling that you're trapped in a cage that gives you the sense of repression that women were under at the time. You can't bend over and you can't reach up, so you have to rely on people all the time. I've never been happier to be born in this time than when I was wearing a corset.

Is acting a form of artistic expression for you, or is it more of a profession?

With both acting and ballet, often you can't just choose when you do it, whereas a painter can go at his own pace. As an actor you have to wait for someone to cast you, so you're relying on the business. I think it's essential to have another creative outlet. Photography, for me, is something I can control fully. It's wholly my own expressions. Plus there's a lot of downtime on set to take pictures.

Are there actors who you admire, not just for their talent but also for the arc of their careers?

So many. Cate Blanchett is amazing. Tilda Swinton. Juliette Binoche. Gena Rowlands in "A Woman Under the Influence." Holly Hunter in "The Piano."

A big part of your performances is the way emotions pass across your face. Are you conscious of your expressions in those moments?

Sometimes I am and sometimes not, but I'm always guaranteed a surprise when I see the film. I try to work from the inside out, so I don't always know what's showing up on my face. Still, sometimes you have to control your face based on what you hear from the director—more of this, less of that.

In "Jane Eyre," the romantic tension between Jane and Rochester is so critical. Was there a way the filmmakers tested that when they cast the film?

Michael and I hadn't met before the first day of rehearsal. That was a big leap of faith for them and there was a huge sigh of relief when we got along. Half your job is done if you can just have fun together.

You've played characters roughly your own age, who are making the rocky transition from adolescence into adulthood. Do these roles ever spill over into your own life?

It wouldn't be right to say a role doesn't affect you personally, even if you don't realize it until later. When I was playing Sophie in the HBO show, I was 16, I was in America for the first time and I had no friends. So Sophie was my friend. And any time I got a new episode I was so excited to see what would happen to this character who was also me, in a way.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 03, 2011 8:31 pm

http://www.movieline.com/2011/03/about-that-one-time-michael-fassbender-gave-a-horse-a-boner.php

The Fassbender Effect || by Jen Yamato || 03 03 2011 6:30 PM
Mia Wasikowska on That Time Michael Fassbender Gave a Horse a Boner

When Cary Fukunaga’s moody adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre hits theaters this month, Mia Wasikowska’s titular heroine might not be the only one seen onscreen making restrained-but-passionate googly eyes at everybody’s favorite man-crush, Michael Fassbender. Even the equine race, it seems, is susceptible to Fassbender’s dashing good looks and charm, as one enamored horse very ardently demonstrated on the set of Jane Eyre.

Fassbender plays the handsome Mr. Edward Rochester, whose love for the headstrong and spirited Jane Eyre (Wasikowska) grows after they meet one day when she startles his horse on the misty grounds of Thornfield Hall. During filming of the scene, cast and crew were treated to a firsthand view of the Fassbender Effect, which Wasikowska delightfully related during her Jane Eyre press tour.

“Michael had a very… huge effect on any horse he got on,” Wasikowska recalled. “There was a horse on the third day of filming [when] we were shooting the scene where Jane and Rochester meet, and every time Michael hopped on the horse it got a huge erection. And he’d get off and they’d run the poor thing around the block to try to make it go away, and he’d hop on it again and it would happen all over again, and they’d have to get him off and run it around.”

“It happened in rehearsals and then on the day of shooting,” she added with a smile. “So it was great.”

Can you blame that poor horse for getting Fassbended? Neither can we. Check back for more the full Movieline Interview with Mia Wasikowska next Wednesday.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:37 am

I'm not sure which advanced screening this was:

http://thechicspy.com/?p=8692

Jane Eyre Screening With Mia Wasikowska and Cary Fukunaga

March 3, 2011 at 11:15 PM

There’s always a smidgin of excitment when attending a movie screening, but it was exceptionally so, a couple of days ago when I attended the screening for Jane Eyre, adapted from the Charlotte Brontë novel about a unassuming governess who falls for her wealthy employer.

What made this screening notable were the VIP attendants, actress Mia Wasikowska, who played the title character and Cary Fukunaga, the young upcoming director (this is only his second film after Sin Nomdre).

Director Cary Fukunaga filming Jane Eyre

After the film concluded, the two were seated in director’s chairs before a packed audience and answered questions about the film. Wasikowska explained how 35-hour per week ballet training when she was young, prepared her for working as an actress physically and mentally; adding that it made her disciplined. She also admitted to extensive research, viewing period images, and re-reading the novel as part of her preparation for her role in the film.

During the screening, I learned that there have been more than three dozen versions of “Jane Eyre” adapted for film and television. Although Fukunaga admitted to the 1943 version starring Orson Wells and Joan Fontaine as his favorite movie as a child, he avoided watching other versions because he didn’t want pressure regarding what to include in his film.

Mia Wasikowska in Jane Eyre on location in Northern England

There were also a couple of fun facts unveiled during the Q&A inlcuding costuming, which was somewhat grueling for Wasikowska who wore waist-cynching corsets that she described as painful and said she could only breathe half breaths as a result. Fukunaga revealed that the film was shot mostly in Northern England in Derbyshire at Haddon Hall, an estate that has been used in several other films including “The Princess Bride” (1986), “Elizabeth” (1998), and “Pride & Prejudice” (2005).

I also had an exclusive opportunity to interview Fukunaga one-on-one. Stay tuned for that interview on Chic Spy TV later this month!
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:12 pm

http://blogs.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2011/03/04/alice-in-wonderland-star-mia-wasikowska-is-a-darker-jane-eyre/

‘Alice in Wonderland’ Star Mia Wasikowska Is a Darker ‘Jane Eyre’
By: Tom Brook Posted: Friday, March 4th, 2011

Mia Wasikowska in 'Jane Eyre'

Mia Wasikowska is back in a new screen portrayal of another British literary heroine in the wake of her starring role in last year’s Alice in Wonderland.

The 21-year-old Australian-born actress appears opposite Michael Fassbender in a fresh adaptation of the 19th century literary classic Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Brontë.

Wasikowska is a fan of British period novels, but for her, Jane Eyre stands apart because of its timelessness.

As she told me, “Jane is such an important character for women — and especially young women at the age that I’m at. She has an innate sense of self-respect which I think a lot of people really connect to.”


There have been countless feature film adaptations of Jane Eyre but this one has Cary Fukunaga, a filmmaker not exactly steeped in the traditions of British period drama, as its director.

The American-born Fukunaga — who has a Swedish mother and Japanese father — made the acclaimed 2009 movie Sin Nombre. At the time of its release it was widely praised as a masterfully told story of three Central American teen migrants as they made a perilous trip across Mexico heading for the U.S. border.

Mia Wasikowska told me that she was excited by the selection of Fukunaga as director and that he’s made the story "younger and darker."

But Fukunaga’s handiwork is subtle. Anyone expecting him to have reinvented this 19th century British classic is probably going to be disappointed. His Jane Eyre is stately and traditional.

Mia Wasikowska straddles both independent and mainstream cinema. She won plaudits for her role in the Oscar-nominated The Kids Are All Right, and Alice in Wonderland — with its billion-dollar box office haul — has given her commercial credibility and an international profile. She’s in demand and has no pressure to compromise. She can pick and choose her roles, a luxury afforded to very few young actors in the film industry today.

Jane Eyre opens next week.

Tom Brook's reports on cinema can be seen every Tuesday and Thursday morning on BBC America.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Mon Mar 07, 2011 12:01 am

http://nymag.com/movies/features/mia-wasikowska-2011-3/

Through a Glass Darkly
After her dragon-slaying Alice, Mia Wasikowska goes goth as Jane Eyre.

* By Logan Hill
* Published Mar 6, 2011

ShareThis

(Photo: Georges Antoni)

‘Black Swan gave me chills,” says Mia Wasikowska, who, bundled up in gray cashmere and clutching a hot cup of tea in the café of the Waldorf-Astoria, is, in fact, shivering. She’s obsessed with Darren Aronofsky’s film for a couple of reasons. First and foremost, there’s her own history with ballet: The 21-year-old actress used to train for 35 hours a week in her hometown of Canberra in Australia. She quit at 15, in part because of the “fluffy and pink” eternally adolescent bubble young dancers are kept in. “And the mothers. And the purity,” she adds. “It was a lot about achieving perfection in your body in ways you can’t really change or control. It’s a cruel kind of thing to be a part of, to expose yourself to such criticism, on such a finite level, down to your big toe or your ankle. It really can erode your self-esteem.”

Being an actress is a cinch by comparison, she says. “Everyone thinks I’m nuts when I say this, but it’s easier to be a young actor than it is to be a dancer. ­People say actors feel the pressure to be thin, too—to be pretty or blah blah blah.” Wasikowska shakes her head and laughs. “And it’s like, ‘You know what? Not really.’ Not to the same extent. Dancers are hard-core. They’re insane.”

The other reason she’s stuck on Black Swan is because it shares DNA with her latest film, Jane Eyre (opening March 11), which stars Wasikowska as the title character, a young woman who, like Natalie Portman’s Nina, is vulnerable and somewhat lost, confused about what’s real (is that a voice in the ­attic?), and intimidated by an older, powerful man (Mr. Rochester, played by Michael Fassbender). Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) has directed the film with a handheld camera, natural light, and Gothic shadows; it is more physical, more frightening, more emotionally wrenching than other updates of Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel—the black swan to lighter versions. “Nina and Jane are two girls trying to make a connection in a dislocated world, trying to find something,” says Wasikowska. “That perpetual preteen thing is a repression [for Nina]. But for Jane, it’s all repression. It’s inside herself. The book is her internal monologue, the whole 500 pages of it.”

Wasikowska’s introduction to American audiences was nine high-wire episodes on the first season of HBO’s In Treatment. She played a teenage patient of Gabriel Byrne’s psychotherapist, a tough gymnast struggling with the sport’s rigor and pressure—a role she could identify with. Confined mostly to a couch, she delivered pages of complex dialogue with an exhausting range of ­emotion—from sullen guardedness to deflective irony to explosive anger—­opposite one of the cagiest, quietest actors on television. “There was nowhere to hide,” says the actress, who was 17 at the time. “But I think my excitement compensated for my fear or something.”

On the basis of that performance, she would land two parts: Annette Bening and Julianne Moore’s daughter in The Kids Are All Right and the title role in Tim Burton’s 3-D Alice in Wonderland. Suddenly, after one low-rated cable show, she was acting on a green-screen set with Johnny Depp. “The prop guys would draw little eyeballs on the tennis ball that was supposed to be the Cheshire cat. I wish I’d had my camera.”

Wasikowska is the middle child of parents John Reid and Marzena Wasikowska, who are both photographers. Not long ago, her mother, who is Polish, gave her an old Rolleiflex, and that has led to a compulsion for chronicling life on the sets of her movies. She asked that wardrobe sew a secret pocket into her Jane Eyre costume so she could keep her camera with her. She digs into a big handbag for her iPhone and thumbs through images: spontaneous portraits of her co-stars Judi Dench (Mrs. Fairfax) and Jamie Bell (St. John Rivers) and a frankly terrifying shot of Fassbender, looking painfully gaunt as Mr. Rochester. “The age difference between me and Michael is kind of magnified in this film,” says Wasikowska. “His ­Rochester is dangerous.” She moves on to a shot of Late Show With David Letterman’s greenroom (“It’s so skanky-looking!”), and an off-kilter, black-and-white photo of the director of her next film, Restless, peering at her through a lens: “Gus Van Sant, one-eyed monster.”

What attracts her to photography is that it’s acting’s exact opposite. “It isn’t dependent on other people telling you when and where—and it’s really fun.” Still, she’s serious about her work: Photographer Mary Ellen Mark, whom the actress met through Alice, is now a mentor and reviews Wasikowska’s photos by e-mail.

All her life, she says, she’s been impatient with herself. “At 14, I would be like, ‘Oh my God, my career … It’s over! I’m practically 95! I’ve lost all my chances!’ I don’t know where it came from, but I always had a sense of, like, doom. Like I hadn’t done enough.” No worries on that front—at least for the next year, which includes a list of films as wide-ranging and unconventional as her first three. In addition to Restless, in which she plays a terminally ill teenager, she just wrapped Albert Nobbs with Glenn Close; she’s about to start production on The Wettest County in the World, a southern crime drama with a screenplay by Nick Cave; and she’s joined the cast of the thriller Stoker, opposite Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth. “I like doing things that are really scary or intimidating,” she says, “and then you kind of conquer it.”

Wasikowska admits that it took a while to feel part of the acting community. “When I first started, it wasn’t my world,” she says. “Over four or five years, it’s become my world and I am part of it. And that’s a really interesting transition to make—from being an outsider to an insider.” Wasikowska laughs. “Or almost an insider.” She rolls her eyes. “Or, whatever.”
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:00 am

http://www.teenhollywood.com/2011/03/08/mia-wasikowska-is-jane-eyre

Mia Wasikowska is Jane Eyre
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By Lynn Barker on March 8, 2011 7:00:00 AM UTC

Jane Eyre isn’t some stuffy old book you are assigned to read at school. It’s the story of a teenager, a rebellious young woman back in the day when girls were supposed to sit in the corner, look pretty and shut up!

Young Jane, a badly-treated orphan, isn’t about to conform to all that. She speaks out, does what she thinks is right and, ultimately, wins personal freedom and the guy of her dreams. What’s not to like? The tale also has a spooky mystery in addition to the hot love story.

Petite blonde Aussie actress Mia Wasikowska who played Alice in the recent Alice in Wonderland film, was so hooked on the story of Jane after reading the book that she went looking for a film version so she could star as the character.

We’re chatting with Mia about what makes Jane tick, how Jane is cool as a role model for young girls today, how she almost froze to death making the film, how she felt about the love story in the movie and how much she loves to take photos with her old-fashioned film camera.

Picture Mia in a classy silk beige and black dress topped with an oversized fuzzy sweater and wearing black tights. No tall shoes for this girl; comfy flats.

TeenHollywood: How do you think the film and Jane relate to teens and kids today? I guess the feelings are the same throughout the ages.

Mia: Yes. I think it’s a very modern story and also a very universal story. When you take away the costumes and the setting, at the core of it is a story of a young girl who is trying to find love and a family and connection in a very dislocated world. I feel like that has transcended. It continues to connect with people. It’s a very universal theme and something almost everybody experiences to a different degree in their life.

TeenHollywood: How cold and miserable was shooting some of the scenes in the rain way out on the Moors? Did you get sick?

Mia: I did. It was day two, I remember that precisely and I got hypothermia but it was okay. It was very, very cold. It’s hard enough standing on the moors in regular clothes let alone with fake rain and period costumes; soggy period costumes.

TeenHollywood: There is also not only the weather but there is a grayness to the world Jane is in. How does that translate to how you create the character?

Mia: Yeah, it was very bleak. When you’re in that environment, you really get a sense of the isolation and the distance between one estate and another estate. Also, as an 18-year-old living in a world where your main source of company is an 8-year-old girl or Mrs. Fairfax [the housekeeper], I thought that was really interesting. Also, in our world, we have so many ways we can escape with technology; TV, Facebook, computers, text messaging and [isolation], for her, was reality every day.

TeenHollywood: There is a lot of fear in the film; fear of noises and things in a spooky house and fear of standing alone and being in love. How do you feel about that?

Mia: There is a fear of the unknown and unseen and unspoken and that’s everywhere physically and emotionally. The whole dynamic with Rochester is kind of like ‘Does he love me? Doesn’t he love me? Is he joking? Is he not?’ It’s not obvious for her so there is a fear emotionally and also physically. Those castles are so desolate and bare and cold. So, yeah, they both kind of play off of each other.

TeenHollywood: Jane is one person inside but has to play a game to live in her uptight society. Was that challenging for you as an actress?

Mia: Yeah, I think so. Something that I really noticed about that period was there is such a mask that people put up. There was a real public persona and a private persona. There was such a system in which things happened, such a definite way of how you performed. Jane kind of goes with and against those things. She’s a real independent thinker and has such a strong sense of who she is and what’s right and wrong despite what society tells her.

TeenHollywood: And it’s her story, she is telling it to us.

Mia: Yes, the book, start to finish, is her internal monologue. Everything we know is because of what we’re told directly from her. So, the challenge, when you adapt that to screen, is how do you keep all the intensity of thought and feeling and everything she’s thinking? Then, there is only limited space for dialogue.

TeenHollywood: It’s such a serious movie. I heard that your co-star Jamie Bell was cutting up on set. Were there light moments between scenes and who was the funny guy?

Mia: Jamie and Michael [Fassbender who plays Rochester], both of them are just fantastic. To counter the intensity of the material, we had a lot of fun in between set ups and scenes and I think that was vital. You really have to get your energy from somewhere so if you’re able to have fun and then use that energy and channel that into the mood and feel of the film, that’s always really helpful. So, to have two co-stars like Michael and Jamie was fantastic. There were just a lot of funny things.

TeenHollywood: There is the “good girl, bad boy” relationship in this and that also transcends the ages. What do you think it is about girls and bad guys?

Mia: I don’t know. And why do they get away with it? [she laughs]. But, there was such a formula with which things happened in Jane’s day and I feel like when that was broken, it was exciting and exhilarating and scary and I’m sure every girl knows how that is sort of thrilling sometimes.

TeenHollywood: Your dance background probably gives you the discipline but also the body carriage of women of that age who were strapped into corsets. Did the dance background help you with that?

Mia: Yeah. I think that dancing has helped or prepared me in a number of different ways for the film industry. Not only with controlling your nerves when you walk into an audition because you’re on stage from a young age so that really helps. Also, just being physically aware. When you dance so intensely you are really aware of your physicality and that’s always great to have as a tool when you’re an actress. There’s many tools you can use.

TeenHollywood: You have an interest in photography and took pictures on the set contrasting the modern filmmaking equipment with the very old locations. Why do you enjoy that so much?

Mia: It’s great. I think it’s really important for actors to have another creative outlet, or anyone really, to have a creative outlet that you can control is really important because you do a lot of waiting to be cast then waiting to go into production, then waiting on set. You are relying on a waiting on other people in acting and films so, to be able to have something that I have full creative control over is really very therapeutic.

TeenHollywood: You use an old-fashioned Rolleiflex camera. That’s probably closer to what the film camera sees on set. Does it give you an understanding of that kind of process?

Mia: Yeah. I love the Rolleifex because it’s a square format and it’s film and really great for portraiture and composition. I love using the film camera because there’s a real mystery about it. Everything is so instant right now and also, with film there are endless possibilities. You can blow it up as big as you want.

TeenHollywood: What do you think gave Jane Eyre her edge; the fact that she was cast out or beaten or had no friends? What gave her the courage or was she born with it?

Mia: I think she has an innate sense of self-respect because there is nowhere really that you’d think that could come from. It’s not like she’s had a loving family or a guardian or someone who has been constantly looking out for her which is why she’s such an incredible character because everything that she is is because of what she’s made herself. There is something inside of her that says, ‘I’m worthy of a good life and being treated well and respected and loved’. And, she’s not going to compromise herself for anybody. She’s going to make sure she’s a fulfilled individual before she attaches herself to anyone and she’s rewarded for that in the end.

TeenHollywood: Go, Jane! Mia, you’ve played a wide variety of roles. Do you find a little of yourself in every one of them or try to lose yourself in a character?

Mia: There’s a bit of both. You definitely put a bit of yourself in every character and you always have to have an understanding and empathy for the person that you play. Then, it’s a give and a take. You can always lose yourself in them. I love doing accents because it takes you one step away from yourself and allows you to embody someone else’s character so I like both sides of it.

TeenHollywood: How comfortable are you with accents?

Mia: With an English accent and an American accent, we have so many American and English films in Australia that we hear it often so it’s not too hard to pick up it’s always a challenge.

TeenHollywood: What kind of music does the modern Mia listen to?

Mia: I like a whole lot of things. I like Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan and The Kinks.

TeenHollywood: Retro girl there.

Mia: I guess so. Then I love World music and kind of everything. Not particularly one thing.

TeenHollywood: You have a project coming up with Guy Pearce and Gary Oldman. Can you talk about who you play?

Mia: Yeah. It’s called The Wettest County and John Hillcoat is directing it and it’s [set in] prohibition era America. It’s about three brothers and I play the girlfriend of Shia LeBeouf’s character. I start that in a few weeks.

TeenHollywood: Did you get the chance to go to any Oscar parties? What was that like?

Mia: Yeah. It’s a crazy weekend. The Oscar weekend is probably the most surreal weekend and those parties are ridiculous. You turn around and there’s Quentin Tarantino talking to Steven Spielberg and on your other shoulder is somebody else so it’s crazy.

TeenHollywood: Do you still keep up with some of your old pals back home?

Mia: Yeah, for sure when I go home I see them. Then there’s Skype or e-mail.

TeenHollywood: What do they think of what has happened with you? I assume most of them aren’t actors?

Mia: Yeah and it’s lovely going home and not feeling like the film world is the whole world and they’re wonderful. They’re really very supportive and excited.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:36 am

http://www.hollywoodoutbreak.com/2011/03/07/its-been-a-really-good-ride-for-jane-eyre-star-mia-wasikowska/

7Mar2011 Filed under: AUDIO FILES/CONTENT, GENERAL, NEWS OF THE DAY

Alice in Wonderland and The Kids Are All Right actress Mia Wasikowska gives her finest performance to date as the lead in Jane Eyre, the latest effort from Sin Nombre filmmaker Cary Fukunaga.

“I feel blessed. I grew up in Australia and I started working here when I was 16 and it always seemed like such a far off thing to happen,” said Wasikowska about her meteoric rise in Hollywood. “This is definitely not the world that I come from and I feel really lucky to be here and be able to work with the people I’ve been able to work with. I definitely don’t take it for granted. It’s been a really good ride.” Click on the media bar and listen to Wasikowska talk about working with Fukanaga (and she also gives her impressions of reading Jane Eyre).

Jane Eyre, co-starring Judi Dench and Michael Fassbender, opens Friday.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:29 pm

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/08/us-miawasikowska-idUSTRE7275YZ20110308

Mia Wasikowska travels from "Alice" to "Jane Eyre"

Australian actress Mia Wasikowska star of the film ''The Kids Are All Right'' arrives at the 2011 Film Independent Spirit Awards in Santa Monica, California February 26, 2011. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Australian actress Mia Wasikowska star of the film ''The Kids Are All Right'' arrives at the 2011 Film Independent Spirit Awards in Santa Monica, California February 26, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Danny Moloshok

By Christine Kearney

NEW YORK | Tue Mar 8, 2011 3:30pm EST

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Even with having a remarkable name and being the face of last year's "Alice In Wonderland," actress Mia Wasikowska may not be familiar to many movie fans.

But the 21-year-old's star has risen rapidly in Hollywood, and she has caught the eye of directors and critics since her career-turning performance in the HBO series, "In Treatment," only a few years ago.

That led her to smaller film roles in 2010's award-winning movies, "Alice" and "The Kids Are All Right." In fact, Wasikowska earned a surprising tie for second with "Alice" co-star Johnny Depp in a Forbes ranking of actors who produced the highest-grossing movie receipts in 2010.

Now she plays the perennial female heroine in another movie adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's 1847 novel, "Jane Eyre," opposite Michael Fassbender and Judi Dench, released on Friday in the United States. The Australian actress talked to Reuters about her meteoric rise and how her paycheck doesn't matter.

Q: You are noted for accents, from various American styles to now, northern England in "Jane Eyre"? Did you practice as a child growing up in Canberra?

A: "I even remember playing dolls in an American accent 'cause for us that was make believe...I think it would be almost scarier for me to do my own accent."

Q: Not so long ago you were in a small soap opera, now, in "Jane Eyre," you are acting alongside the likes of Judi Dench?

A: "It helps not to think of it as too bizarre. It could be easy to get overwhelmed by it. It also helps that I have worked with great people, but they are also really grounded."

Q: Do you remember being daunted at any stage?

A: "I am not going to pretend that I have never been daunted by anyone, because for sure when Johnny Depp walks into a room he is like the face of, I don't know, but I also felt really comfortable talking to him as the Mad Hatter...at the beginning, for sure, but I have never worked with anyone where it stayed."

Q: Did you always feel such inner confidence?

A: "I have my moments of doubt when I feel insecure, I am sure. I wasn't raised to be idolizing people in a way that I think some people have a sense of, when they are brought up. At the end of the day everyone is human, everyone is a person.

"But I was always had a drive to do stuff and always felt like I wasn't doing enough. You know, I felt over the hill at 14 and that drove me, I was very quietly dramatic."

Q: Jane Eyre also has an inner confidence and determination. Why does this character keep resonating?

A: "It's a really important character for women particularly, because she has an innate sense of self respect, which a lot of people don't have. And she has no one to have got that from, it's not like she had a loving upbringing or something, but she is born with something inside of her that says 'I am worth having a good life. I am worth being respected, I am worth having a good relationship. And I am worth being treated well.' And all those things speak to people, no matter what time it is."

Q: You chose this, a relatively small film, after "Alice." Would you do a blockbuster, say an "Iron Man"?

A: "I don't think so. It really depends what it is. But "Alice" was exposure on such a level that I have never experienced before...I want to keep doing roles that are interesting, and I think the blockbuster things don't provide that at the moment, or it's more rare to find."

Q: Do you feel the weight of your talent?

A: "I don't know how people perceive me. I want to keep doing things that are very different."

Q: Very modest of you. How do you handle the red carpets?

A: "I feel a little bit less secure in those situations. I would prefer to be on the set a thousand times."

Q: Do you care how much you get paid?

A: "I would rather do things that have creative integrity and that I think are fulfilling."

Q: What is your life really like now? Ever get lonely?

A: "Yeah for sure. We meet so many people and at the same time it is very solitary, which is fine right now. It can only last so long where you are fine with that. There is such a contrast between the times. You are on set with 150 people and everybody is in your face fixing things and discussing and then you go home and it's the complete opposite."

(Editing by Bob Tourtellotte)
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:32 pm

http://collider.com/mia-wasikowska-interview-jane-eyre-restless-wettest-country/79518/

Mia Wasikowska Interview JANE EYRE; Updates on RESTLESS and THE WETTEST COUNTY
by Christina Radish Posted:March 8th, 2011 at 10:26 am

The classic tale of Jane Eyre has been given a bold new re-telling that is infused with a contemporary awareness that makes it easily relatable to a modern audience. With Cary Joji Fukunaga at the helm, and starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender in the lead roles of the romantic drama, the 19 Century-set story follows an orphaned girl who is mistreated and then cast out of her childhood home, and subjected to further harsh treatment at a charity school. A teenaged Jane (Wasikowska) is then sent to the vast Thornfield Hall, under the guidance of the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench), where she works as a governess for a child under the brooding master of the estate, Edward Rochester (Fassbender). As the two engage in games of wit and storytelling, they develop a deep connection which both frightens and intrigues her.

At the film’s press day, Australian actress Mia Wasikowska, best known for her roles in Alice in Wonderland and The Kids Are All Right, talked about how much she wanted to play this role, why a story set in this era is still so universal, playing the subtleties of a woman in this time period, and how much she enjoyed working with co-stars Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell. She also talked about her roles in the upcoming features Restless, directed by Gus Van Sant, and The Wettest County, directed by John Hillcoat. Check out what she had to say after the jump:

Question: How familiar were you with the book or other film versions of the story?

MIA WASIKOWSKA: I had just read the book in 2009, and I was half-way through it when I called my agent and said, “This is amazing. Is there a script around or is anyone developing the project?” There wasn’t at the time, but two months later, she emailed me a script, and then I met (director) Cary [Joji Fukunaga]. It was a case of really good timing.

How do you think the film and Jane relate to older teen girls today? Do you feel like these feelings transcend the ages?

WASIKOWSKA: Yes. I think it’s a very modern story and also a very universal story. When you take away the costumes and the setting, at the core of it is a story of a young girl who is trying to find love and a family and connection, in a very dislocated world. I feel like that has transcended. It continues to connect with people. It’s a very universal theme and something almost everybody experiences to a different degree in their life.

How cold and miserable was it to shoot some of these scenes where you had to be out in the weather? Did you get sick?

WASIKOWSKA: I did. I remember precisely that, on day two, I got hypothermia, but it was okay. It was very, very cold. It was hard enough in regular clothes, let alone with fake rain and soggy period costumes.

There was not only the weather, but a grayness to the world Jane is in. How did that translate to how you create the character?

WASIKOWSKA: Yeah, it was very bleak. When you’re in that environment, you really get a sense of the isolation and the distance between one estate and another. Also, as an 18-year-old living in a world where your main source of company is an 8-year-old girl or Mrs. Fairfax, I thought that was really interesting. In our world, we have so many ways we can escape with technology, like TV, Facebook, computers, text messaging and all that. For her, it was reality, every day.

There is a lot of fear in the film and Jane even though Jane is bold, she has to have some sense of fear. How did that external fear balance with her internal fear?

WASIKOWSKA: They echo each other. There is a fear of the unknown, unseen and unspoken, and that’s everywhere. The whole dynamic with Rochester (Michael Fassbender) is like, “Does he love me? Doesn’t he love me? Is he joking? Is he not?” It’s not obvious for her, so there is a fear, emotionally and physically. Those castles are so desolate, bare and cold. So, they both play off of each other.

It was nice to see such subtle performances. Is that very challenging?

WASIKOWSKA: Yeah, I think so. Something that I really noticed about that period was there is such a mask that people put up. There was a public persona and a private persona, and those were the things that really interested me, particularly because there was such a system in which things happened and such a definite way of how you performed. Jane goes with and against those things. She’s a real independent thinker, and has such a strong sense of who she is and what’s right and wrong, despite what society tells her. Then, at the same time, she’s very reserved. The book, start to finish, is her internal monologue. Everything we know is because of what we’re told directly from her. So the challenge, when you adapt that to the screen, is how do you keep all the intensity of thought and feeling, and everything she’s thinking? Then, there is only limited space for dialogue.

This is such a serious movie, but were there light moments between scenes, during filming?

WASIKOWSKA: Jamie [Bell] and Michael [Fassbender] are just fantastic. To counter the intensity of the material, we had a lot of fun in between set-ups and scenes, and that was vital. You really have to get your energy from somewhere, so if you’re able to have fun and then use that energy, and channel that into the mood and feel of the film, that’s always really helpful. To have two co-stars like Michael and Jamie was fantastic. There were just a lot of funny things that happened.

Is it true that there was a horse who also lightened things up a bit?

WASIKOWSKA: It did, yes. Michael had a very huge effect on any horse he got on. On the third day of filming, we were shooting the scene where Jane and Rochester meet, and every time Michael hopped on the horse, it got a huge erection. He’d get off and they’d run the poor thing around the block to get it to go away, and then he’d hop on and it would happen all over again. That was great.

Do you think that today’s readers and viewers realize how unusual it was for Jane to be as headstrong as she was and say, “I want to marry for love”?

WASIKOWSKA: It’s hard to tell what people realize. Everybody’s different and has a different understanding of the difference in times. I think it’s probably clear enough to see how radical she is, for her time, even though we don’t have a lot of the problems she would have faced then.

Did you speak French before this or did you learn for the film?

WASIKOWSKA: I learned a little bit of French, just for the specific scenes but it was very informal. I had Eglantine, who played Sophie, and Romy, who was Adele, giving me lessons between takes, which was good.

Your dance background probably gives you the discipline, but did it also help you with the body carriage of women of that age, who were strapped into corsets?

WASIKOWSKA: Yeah. I think that dancing has helped or prepared me, in a number of different ways, for the film industry, especially with controlling your nerves when you walk into an audition because you’re on stage from a young age. That really helps. Also, just being physically aware. When you dance so intensely, you are really aware of your physicality, and that’s always great to have as a tool, when you’re an actress. There are many tools you can use.

Is there a different relationship with cast and crew when you are the lead in the film, playing the title role?

WASIKOWSKA: Even if it’s not spoken, you definitely feel a certain amount of pressure or weight, in some ways, but I have a lot of people to lean on, with Cary, Michael, Jamie and the whole cast. There was a lot of help there.

You have an interest in photography and took pictures on the set. Why do you enjoy that so much?

WASIKOWSKA: It’s great. I think it’s really important for actors to have another creative outlet, or for anyone, really. To have a creative outlet that you can control is really important because you do a lot of waiting to be cast, then waiting to go into production, and then waiting on set. You are relying on a waiting on other people in acting and films, so to be able to have something that I have full creative control over is really very therapeutic.

In working with people like Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Julianne Moore and Annette Bening, what sort of advice have you gotten?

WASIKOWSKA: The thing about all of those actors is that they are so professional and they work really hard and they seem to really like what they do. Judi has such a young energy, and she’s so much fun and kind and friendly. They’re all really professional, lovely people, but there’s no direct advice that they’ve given me. It’s more like observing the things that they’ve chosen to do. That’s where I learn the most.

What do you think gave Jane Eyre her courage, or do you think she was born with it?

WASIKOWSKA: I think she has an innate sense of self-respect. It’s not like she’s had a loving family, or a guardian, or someone who has been constantly looking out for her, which is why she’s such an incredible character. Everything that she is, is because of what she’s made herself. What she’s become is because of something inside of her that says, “I’m worthy of a good life, being treated well, and being respected and loved.” She’s not going to compromise herself for anybody. She’s going to make sure she’s a fulfilled individual before she attaches herself to anyone, and she’s rewarded for that, in the end.

You’ve played a wide variety of roles. Do you find yourself in every one of them, or do you try to lose yourself in a character?

WASIKOWSKA: There’s a bit of both. It’s a contradiction, but you definitely put a bit of yourself in every character, and you always have to have an understanding and empathy for the person that you play. It’s a give and take. You can always lose yourself in them. I love doing accents because it takes you one step away from yourself and allows you to embody someone else’s character. I like both sides of it.

How comfortable are you with accents?

WASIKOWSKA: I usually learn a specific accent and it stays that way. We have so many American and English films in Australia that we hear those accents often, so they’re not too hard to pick up, but it’s always a challenge.

You’ve worked with amazing directors. Is there someone you would like to work with again?

WASIKOWSKA: I’ve been really lucky. I’ve had a great experience with pretty much everybody I’ve worked with. I did a Gus Van Sant film last year, and I love his films. When I was younger and watching his films, they gave me a different perspective on filmmaking. I think everything he does is so brilliant. I’d love to work with him again, and Cary [Joji Fukunaga] and Tim [Burton]. There’s a bunch of directors that I really admire, and Australian ones as well. It would be nice to do a film at home.

What is your role in Restless, the Gus Van Sant film?

WASIKOWSKA: I’ve been a fan of Gus’ for ages, and to be able to work with him was great. He is the kind of director who is so trusting. I felt so comfortable on his film set. To play a teenager like Anabelle, it’s really rare to get a teenage role that resembles something of what it’s like to be a young person, that isn’t a cliché or a stereotype. I think that’s what Gus does really well. He always presents adolescence in a way that gives us a lot of credit for our emotional complexity and ability to handle complex situations.

Is he as quiet on set as he is in person?

WASIKOWSKA: Yes.

You also have a project coming up with Guy Pearce and Gary Oldman. What is that film about and who do you play in it?

WASIKOWSKA: Yeah, it’s called The Wettest County, and John Hillcoat is directing it. It’s Prohibition Era America. It’s about three brothers and I play the girlfriend of Shia LeBeouf’s character. I start that in a few weeks.

What helps you get into different eras?

WASIKOWSKA: The wardrobe is always the last piece of the puzzle. When you step into the clothing, that’s the final step to figuring out that character. I also like looking at a lot of pictures from the era, or if there is any footage. I always collect a bunch of images for every film that I do, that reminds me of an essence of the character, or the time that they live in, or what they’re experiencing.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:39 pm

http://blogs.indiewire.com/thompsononhollywood/2011/03/08/video_interview_wasikowska_and_fukunaga_talk_jane_eyre/

Video Interview: Wasikowska and Fukunaga Talk Jane Eyre
Thompson on Hollywood

Check out the Film Independent interview (below, with trailer) with Jane Eyre director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) and star Mia Wasikowska (The Kids Are All Right, Alice in Wonderland). He explains why he wanted to adapt the Charlotte Bronte public domain classic, and how he came to cast Wasikowska as the lonely governess who comes to work for and love the tragic Mr. Rochester, played by rising star Michael Fassbender (here’s my old flip cam interview). Focus Features opens the film March 11.

Caryn James points out that Fassbender falls in the tradition of Rochesters past who are far more good-looking than Bronte described him.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:50 am

http://www.kspr.com/la-et-mia-wasikowska-20110310,0,1838167.story

Mia Wasikowska: The quiet observer
Last year, she was 'Alice.' This year, she's 'Jane Eyre.' With these and other upcoming roles, the shy young Aussie is cementing her spot in Young Hollywood.

Australian actress Mia Wasikowska stars as "Jane Eyre." (Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times

March 10, 2011

Of all the stars Mia Wasikowska saw at Vanity Fair's exclusive Oscar party last month, Justin Bieber was the one she found most fascinating. There he was, in all his pint-sized teen idol glory, scurrying around the Sunset Tower with Disney star Selena Gomez in tow.

"They were just, like, snickering and running away somewhere," the actress, 21, recounted.

But unlike Bieber's legion of screaming tween fans, Wasikowska wasn't interested in the romantic status of the pair. Instead, she was struck by how many partygoers also seemed unable to tear their eyes away from the young singer.

"I was thinking, 'Wow, how do you handle that?'" she said. "I'm so curious about people like that."

Indeed, Bieber's world is one Wasikowska can scarcely imagine — and most definitely doesn't want to be — living in. Despite her leading role in last year's blockbuster "Alice in Wonderland," she's still not the kind of actress people recognize.

When she arrived for an interview last week at the Venice cafe she had selected for lunch, no one gawked at her unfussy look (an outfit of muted colors, just-brushed cropped hair and Mary Janes). She curled into a wall while waiting for her table, looking at the eccentric artist types filling the place.

It was almost as if she were still playing the role of Jane Eyre, the 19th century English literary heroine who Wasikowska takes on in a new film based on the Charlotte Brontë novel, out in Los Angeles on Friday. Quiet and even meek on the surface, both the character and the actress harbor less obvious passions.

"Sort of a pot of boiling water with a lid on it," as "Jane Eyre" director Cary Fukunaga explained it.

"I like to think of myself as an observer," said Wasikowska. "And the whole experience of 'Alice' sort of made me be observed, so that was occasionally uncomfortable. It was sort of on a level that I've never experienced before. At times, it was kind of scary. ... Once you're put out there in the public eye, people feel a certain ownership over you. It's interesting feeling out of control of your identity."

Despite her feelings about fame, Wasikowska has been working in the public eye since she was a teenager in her native Australia, where she had a role on a popular television medical drama. Her first break in America came with a turn as a suicidal gymnast on the HBO series "In Treatment." She attracted enough notice to land a number of films, including "Alice" and last year's Oscar-nominated "The Kids Are All Right," in which she played the daughter of Annette Bening and Julianne's Moore's lesbian couple, in addition to "Jane Eyre."

If she hasn't already cemented her place as one of Young Hollywood's leading actresses, the next year should do it. In the coming months, she has a slew of diverse parts in a number of high-profile projects. There's Gus Van Sant's "Restless," her first real romantic leading role; "Albert Nobbs," a drama written by Glenn Close and John Banville and directed by Rodrigo García; "The Wettest County in the World," a Depression-era crime drama in which she's cast opposite Shia LaBeouf; and "Stoker," a film directed by fanboy favorite Park Chan-wook with Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman.

Asked to describe what it was like working with Wasikowska, a handful of filmmakers and actors all came back with essentially the same response.

"She's shy," said Van Sant.

"She's totally not self-promoting," added Close.

"She's not the person who is looking to be the center of attention," echoed Fukunaga.

Or, as her "Alice in Wonderland" costar Helena Bonham Carter put it: "Mia is quietly extraordinary."

But is she really as timid as everyone imagines?

"I think so," copped the actress, pausing for a moment on the thought. "I mean, there's a certain amount of performing that goes on, but I don't know. Do people think I'm shy? I am in situations."

While she has become more comfortable in Hollywood, she doesn't want to move here permanently and still spends any time she has off with her family back in her hometown of Canberra. There, she mostly sleeps and reads.

It was at home that she became transfixed by "Jane Eyre," e-mailing her agent after only a few chapters to find out whether anyone was developing the project into a film. The famous book has, of course, been on the screen numerous times before: Since 1910, there have been 18 feature versions, plus nine television versions.

Overwhelmed by the sheer volume of the past incarnations, Wasikowska didn't watch any of them. But she still felt a pull to the character that she wasn't able to fully articulate.

"Often, if I read a story and I'm moved, I have an understanding for a character and I don't really know why," she said. She's been in relationships before, but none as intense as the one between Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester, played in the new film by German-born actor Michael Fassbender.

"Nothing on that level, with a wife in the attic," she laughed. "But I think every girl has her relationship that's the really dramatic one. And we really wanted there to be a sense of that all going on inside her head. Like anyone who experiences bottling something up, when you get the chance to let that out, that's terrifying and sad and everything."

She paused to pull out her iPhone, showing off a photograph she took on the set in Derbyshire, England. During the last year, she's begun toting a camera around on her travels, taking pictures of her hotel rooms and costars. (Both of her parents are also photographers.)

"I just like to shoot my perspective," she said, flipping through a series of images and stopping on one of Van Sant with a viewfinder shrouding his face. While shooting "Restless," she said, he encouraged her to take as many photographs as she wanted.

"To her, this is all a big adventure," Van Sant said of the actress' burgeoning career. "She works a lot. I think there's something where she wants to do as much as she can, just to find her way in the Hollywood world."
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:08 am

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=74385

Exclusive CS Video: Jane Eyre Director Cary Fukunaga
Source: Edward Douglas
March 9, 2011

There may be a further departure a director could take than Cary Joji Fukunaga going from his Mexican immigration thriller Sin Nombre to tackling Charlotte Brontë's timeless coming-of-age novel Jane Eyre, but it certainly shows how important diversity is to the filmmaker who first made waves at the Sundance Film Festival two years ago.

For his second feature film, he got Mia Wasikowska to play the lead role, fresh off her stints in Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland and Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids Are All Right with Michael Fassbender playing her boss-turned-lover Edward Rochester and a fantastic ensemble cast that includes Dame Judi Dench, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins and Simon McBurney.

This isn't the first time Brontë's novel has been adapted to the screen, far from it, but adapted by Moira Buffini, the film finds an ambitious way of condensing Jane's expansive life story into a tight two-hour film that focuses on her time at Thornfield Hall, but doesn't skimp on her childhood either.

Oddly, the last time we spoke to the filmmaker (an interview you can read here), Fukunaga had lamented how most of the best scripts and projects go to A-list directors, but clearly he ranks among them now to have gotten such a prestigious gig.

In the following exclusive video interview with Fukunaga, we discuss:

* How he went from Sin Nombre to this project
* What he wanted to do different with his version on the story
* How they came up with the non-linear way of telling the story
* Casting Mia Wasikowska as Jane
* Whether he had to face conflicts being an American filmmaker telling the story
* How he was able to immerse himself into the time period for accuracy
* Going for a far more muted color scheme
And more!

Jane Eyre opens in select cities on Friday, March 11. You can read our previous interview with the film's Rochester, Michael Fassbender, here.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:21 am

http://blog.moviefone.com/2011/03/09/mia-wasikowska-interview-jane-eyre/

Mia Wasikowska Talks 'Jane Eyre,' Kissing Michael Fassbender and Corsets

By Andrew Scott (Subscribe to Andrew Scott's posts)
Posted Mar 9th 2011 11:00AM

Twenty-one-year-old actress Mia Wasikowska is entering the prime of her movie career, thanks to key roles in the $1 billion-grossing 'Alice in Wonderland' and the Oscar-nominated indie 'The Kids Are All Right.'

This Friday, she steps into even bigger shoes, taking on the title role in Cary Fukunaga's adaptation of the Charlotte Bronte novel 'Jane Eyre.'

Moviefone recently spoke to the actress about the movie, during which she revealed what it was like having Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell pining for her affections and why corsets are just as painful as they look. She also gave us the scoop on working with Glenn Close in the upcoming movie 'Albert Nobbs.'

Check out the full interview after the jump.

Moviefone: The one thing that surprised me about 'Jane Eyre' was how dark and violent it was. I would assume that was intentional from the get-go.
Mia Wasikowska: Yeah, I think so. I think originally that was sort of what Cary [Fukunaga]'s idea for the film was. I hope that it achieved that. I think it did.

You did a lot of kissing scenes with Michael Fassbender, who is 12 years your senior. That first take must have been awkward.
[Laughs] You know what? Yeah. You just kind of get over it, and you go with it. But Michael's the best. He's just the coolest guy, and so it was fun.

He's pretty easy on the eyes, so I imagine it wasn't that bad.
[Laughs] Yeah. I pretend to complain.

You also have Jamie Bell after you in the movie. I think the correct word to describe you is "spoiled."
Uh-huh. I'm in a bit of an enviable position there. [Laughs]

We've seen a lot of 'Jane Eyre' movies over the years. What is it about this film that makes it stand out above the rest?
Well, I think that we kind of wanted to ground it in a way. It is a dramatic story, but we didn't want to make it too melodramatic. What I liked about Cary's vision for it, initially, was that he sort wanted to bring it down and make it a lot younger. Jane really is 18 years old in the story, and I think often what other versions have done is, she's always sort of presented a little older. Even I was, like, 20 when we did it, but I think people still thought I was quite a young Jane, and it sort of magnifies the difference in age between her and Rochester. And I think was kind of exciting, and something that I hope is different.

Did you read the book beforehand?
Yeah, I did. I was reading the book, and I was on the fifth chapter when I emailed my agent, and I was like, "This is great. Is there a script? Is anyone making this?" And there wasn't at the time. And it was, like, two months later that she e-mailed me. She sent me the script, and was like, "It's going ahead, and the director would like to meet you." It was great timing. I had just read the book.

One of the things I loved about 'Jane Eyre' were the costumes. Was there any point in which you wanted to steal them?
Hell no! I couldn't wait to get out of those things. [Laughs]

Was it torture?
Oh, yeah. I've never been happier to be born in the time that I am in than when we first hopped into those corsets. They are as bad as everybody says -- and worse. [Laughs] ... I was so excited, I would count down the days until I had a scene in my pajamas.

Speaking of corsets, you're also in 'Albert Nobbs' with Glenn Close. How is that going?
Great! We just wrapped, and I'm really excited about the film. Glenn Close wrote the script, and she's had the rights to the story for 10 years; she was in the off-Broadway play. It's her passion project. Rodrigo Garcia, who I worked with when I was 16 in 'In Treatment,' is directing it, and I think it was a good shoot, so I can't wait for people to see it.

You had a huge year in 2010, with 'Alice in Wonderland' and 'The Kids Are All Right.' Do you find yourself getting more offers now?
Yeah. I mean, it's been really great. They were very different productions, on different scales, as well, but 'Kids' has had such great luck in terms of being able to reach as many people. So it's been good having two very different things out there.

Do you have any plans to work with Tim Burton again?
I would love to. He's the coolest. I had a lot of fun working with him. That would be great. We'll see.

You're 21 now, and your movie career is really kicking into full gear. What kinds of roles are you looking to do in the future?
I want to keep doing roles that are challenging and different. I like doing lots of different roles. I think to remain interested in [acting], it's important to challenge yourself and do things that are scary or different from something I've done before, so yeah. I want to do that; things that challenge me and challenge the audience.

Is Australia still home to you? Or are you planning the big move to L.A.?
Yeah. So far, I've been able to pull it off living at home in Australia, and I kind of want to continue that. I like the perspective and I like the distance from L.A. and Hollywood, and it's always kind of great to go home, and very grounding. I love seeing my family. I don't really have a place of my own, but I like going home. It's a bit of a split world.

I loved you on 'In Treatment.' Even though your movie career is booming right now, would you ever consider returning to television?
'In Treatment' was one of the coolest experiences ever for me, and I loved that character. I'm not sure, though. It would depend. I feel so lucky to have had that role, and to be able to have explored that character in such depths.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:21 am

http://www.ifc.com/news/2011/03/mia-wasikowska.php

Mia Wasikowska Stays the Corset With "Jane Eyre"
The "Alice in Wonderland" star on her new role in an old classic.
Posted 03/09/2011 845 AM by Matt Singer

Photo: "Jane Eyre," Focus Features, 2011.

We wrap up our three-part series of "Jane Eyre" video interviews with Ms. Eyre herself, Mia Wasikowska. Asked how her Jane stood apart from the many previous cinematic and televisual interpretations, Wasikowska replied, "I think [director] Cary [Fukunaga] really wanted to bring out the darker elements...the book is really very gothic and a lot about the unspoken and the unknown."

It wasn't that long ago that the 21-year-old actress from Australia was unknown herself. But Wasikowska has quickly risen through the ranks of Hollywood ingenues with memorable performances in HBO's "In Treatment," as the title character in Tim Burton's smash reimagining of "Alice in Wonderland," and as a member of the terrific ensenmble in Lisa Cholodenko's "The Kids Are All Right." During our interview, I asked Wasikowska to compare her Alice and her Jane Eyre, and to describe the agony of wearing those period costumes and corset (I figured it was easier than putting one to find out for myself). Here's the video -- and don't forget to watch our other "Jane Eyre" videos with director Cary Fukunaga and co-star Michael Fassbender.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:22 am

http://www.movieline.com/2011/03/mia-wasikowska-on-jane-eyre-krzysztof-kieslowski-and-avoiding-the-popcorn-stuff.php

Mia Wasikowska on Jane Eyre, Growing Up Kieślowski, and Avoiding ‘the Popcorn Stuff’

Following a stellar year in which she starred in two Oscar-nominated films (Alice and Wonderland, The Kids Are All Right), Australian actress Mia Wasikowska continues to impress in Jane Eyre, a moody and gorgeously haunting adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë classic helmed by director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre). The 21-year-old commands the screen as the titular heroine, an unloved orphan-turned-headstrong young governess who falls for her employer ( Michael Fassbender) as sordid secrets threaten to destroy her chance at happiness. Challenging material for most young actresses, but what did you expect from a girl who grew up watching Kieślowski?

Wasikowska spoke with Movieline days after the Oscars, revealing that she hadn’t actually attended Hollywood’s big night despite the high-profile nominations of her two 2010 films. But given her startlingly mature and delicately nuanced performance in Jane Eyre (in limited release this week) and her proclivity for working with independent-minded directors (upcoming films include Gus Van Sant’s Restless and Rodrigo Garcia’s Albert Nobbs — a far cry from the clichéd popcorn roles she told Movieline she avoids), it can’t be long until Wasikowska takes the Academy stage herself.

How was your first Oscar weekend?

I didn’t go, but it was the first time I’d been in something that was nominated.

Well, you had two films nominated — you’re batting pretty high for a young actor.

Yeah, it’s wonderful! It was a good year.

Jane Eyre continues the streak; it’s an incredibly beautiful film. What piqued your interest about playing this literary heroine?
I think that the story is so modern, in a way, in the sense that if you took away the costumes and the setting, at the core of it is a story that is very much a modern story. And it’s testament to the book — the book’s popularity has never wavered, it’s never died down. If anything it’s gotten stronger and continued and it keeps connecting with people. And that’s because at the core of it you have a young woman who’s trying to find a family and love and a connection, in a very dislocated world. I was completely struck by her character when I read the book.

Had you read the book before reading the script?

I read the book mid-2009, and I was halfway through it when I emailed my agent and I was like, “Is there a project around, are they developing a script — is there anything happening with this?” There wasn’t at the time but about two months later she emailed me the script and I met with Cary. So it was amazing timing.

No kidding! You just happened to be reading Jane Eyre at that time?

Yeah! I came back home to Australia from filming Alice in Wonderland and it was the first time I didn’t have to go back to school, and I was at such a loss for what to do. So I decided to make a list of books I should read to try and educate myself, and Jane Eyre was one of them. It was amazing.

It’s a classic. What else was on your reading list?

I had a lot of catching up to do so I had a lot of the typical classics - To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, Animal Farm, One Hundred Days of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera. All the big ones. And Jane was my English literature component. [Laughs]

Having known and loved the character, what was your reaction to how Moira Buffini adapted the story?

The book is from start to finish 500+ pages of Jane’s inner monologue. Everything we know is because of what she’s told us directly. So the challenge of adapting it to screen is that you have such a limited opportunity to show actual dialogue, but then you want to get a sense of her intense thought and her observations and everything that’s going on in her mind. I thought the script really captured that. And I loved how it begun instantly, with her running away — for people who don’t know the story, you’re instantly with her, running away. It’s a mystery; you want to know who she is, what she’s doing, and why she’s there, and how she got to be there. And that I really love.

Another actress, Amelia Clarkson, plays the younger Jane. Did you work with her to establish commonalities in your respective portrayals?

Yes, we hung out for a few days during the rehearsal period and talked about Jane, read some scenes just for fun, and she’s excellent.

Jane Eyre is such a different film from Cary Fukunaga’s feature debut, Sin Nombre, that he may have taken some people by surprise with this project as his follow-up. How do you see the fit between director and material?

He brought a really fresh energy to it and a lot of youth and enthusiasm to the material. And also kind of an outsider’s perspective, which I think is really great. One of the things that struck me reading the book was that for some reason, in my mind, Jane was an adult. Then when I read the script, I realized she’s only 18 — she’s a teenager. And I’d always thought of her as this older person, but she’s the same age as me, yet her responsibilities are so elevated. She has so much on her shoulders, compounded by an incredible isolation, and her main company is with an 8-year-old and Mrs. Fairfax. Cary’s ideas from the beginning really emphasized her youth. That makes the dynamic between Jane and Rochester really interesting, I think.

Did you feel the age difference on set with Michael Fassbender?
You know, not really. The thing is, I had so much fun with Michael. From the beginning I think there was a sigh of relief on everybody’s part that we got on so well, and from there half your job is done in the sense that we have a similar way of working, so we were able to counter the intensity of the material with a lot of fun and then channel that energy into the intensity of the scenes. And I think we just brought out the kid in each other, really. I felt like a 10-year-old hanging out with my buddy with Michael.

In terms of your other love interest, you got to reunite with your Defiance co-star Jamie Bell, which was fun for me as a viewer, thinking “Forest wife!” to myself in the theater.

I know! We’ve already been married in a previous film! It was so much fun — Jamie is one of my favorite people to work with. We had a blast.

Was it completely coincidental that Jamie was cast in Jane Eyre?
I think I was already on the project and then Cary told me that he was doing it and I was like, “Excellent!”

While we’re on the subject of Michael and Jamie as Rochester and St. John, if Jane was your friend do you think you’d counsel her to make different romantic decisions?

I think she made pretty good decisions — I think she’d be counseling me!

As a young person of the 21st century, how do you relate to Jane’s predicament and the specific period gender politics at hand?
There was such etiquette and such a system, a way that things happened. If something happened outside of that pattern, it was like, “Whoa!” It was scandalous. For me now, I feel like we still have that — a certain amount of the way things happen, the way things are done. But we have a lot more freedom, and that’s part of my admiration for Jane. She was an independent thinker, had such strength of character and thought, and in that time she was kind of radical. I feel like if she was in our time she’d be running Parliament or something, running the country.

Another element of this adaptation that Cary emphasizes is the Gothic horror feel, the bumps in the night and ghostly whisperings. How did you play that up in the moment?

So much of that is credited to Adriano Goldman, the cinematographer — his lighting, and the score, and the way Cary shot things. And I just had to inhabit those areas. But it’s a really dark book and a Gothic novel, so I was happy those things were included.

You’ve cited Kieslowski as an artistic influence. How were you exposed to his work, and what other artists have inspired you?
Both my parents are photographers and my mom is Polish, so I grew up watching a lot of European cinema and independent cinema. My mom would always kind of educate me on that. Kieslowski was her favorite director and his Three Colors trilogy always seemed to be playing on a loop in my house all the time, so I kind of grew up watching it. I’ve always had such strong memories of it playing. And when I watched it seriously all the way through for the first time, I was really struck by it. He’s one of a number of other filmmakers who’ve really changed my perspective on cinema and what it can mean and do.

You’re of an age where, in Hollywood, many of your peers take the teen movie route. How deliberate have your choices been as you’ve emerged as an actress? Do you shy away from those mainstream young person roles and projects?

Yeah, and I feel like I’ve been very lucky. You know, it’s rare to get a character that resembles something of what it’s actually like to be a teenager or a young person. There are so many clichés and stereotypes, and I feel like although they’re very attractive to watch — it’s very attractive to watch clichés and stereotypes — I feel like they’re so hard to connect to. It’s all popcorn stuff. It’s fun to watch but at the end of it they’re kind of void of substance. So I love trying to find material that I think is true to what it’s like to be a young person or a young girl, from my understanding of it or my friends’ understanding of it.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:38 am

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/entertainment/film-tv/news/wasikowska-got-ill-during-jane-eyre-15108549.html

Wasikowska got ill during Jane Eyre

Wednesday, 9 March 2011

Mia Wasikowska has revealed she got hypothermia as she filmed Jane Eyre.

The Kids Are All Right actress, who portrays the titular character in Cary Joji Fukunaga's adaptation, fell ill on the set of the period drama because they were filming scenes in cold and wet weather.

"I remember precisely that, on day two, I got hypothermia, but it was okay - it was very, very cold," she told Collider.

"It was hard enough in regular clothes, let alone with fake rain and soggy period costumes."

Mia - who was propelled to stardom after appearing in Tim Burton's Alice In Wonderland alongside Johnny Depp - credited her co-stars Michael Fassbender (Edward Rochester) and Jamie Bell (St John) for lightening the bleak atmosphere.

"Jamie and Michael are just fantastic. To counter the intensity of the material, we had a lot of fun in between set-ups and scenes, and that was vital," she recalled.

"You really have to get your energy from somewhere, so if you're able to have fun and then use that energy, and channel that into the mood and feel of the film, that's always really helpful. There were just a lot of funny things that happened."

Jane Eyre will be released in the UK on September 9.
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:19 pm

http://www.sheknows.com/entertainment/articles/825999/mia-wasikowska-is-jane-eyre

Mia Wasikowska Video Q&A

* Posted on Mar 10, 2011 10:00 AM by Joel D. Amos

When we first met Mia Wasikowska to talk about Alice in Wonderland, news had broke that the actress was cast to play the title role in Jane Eyre. Before any discussion of anything Alice, there were many congratulations on Wasikowska’s Jane Eyre casting coup. Her excitement for the part was palpable.

Now, SheKnows sits across from Mia Wasikowska for another video interview, this time for the release of Jane Eyre, out in theaters March 11. She is still a picture of pride, but there is also a layer of accomplishment. And she should be all of the above as Wasikowska shines as the title character from the iconic Charlotte Bronte novel.

Jane Eyre stars Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska

Jane Eyre is equally about the limits forced on women by societal mores in another century as it is a sweeping romance that proves that love does not come easy, regardless of the era.

Wasikowska, after stellar performances in The Kids Are All Right and Alice in Wonderland, would make Bronte proud. She has accomplished so much in her telling of the Jane Eyre story. Mia chats up her Jane Eyre experience including the chance to star opposite Oscar-winner Judi Dench and Michael Fassbender -- who stars as Edward Rochester. Fassbender is beyond scorching right now with his casting in X-Men: First Class as Magneto and his searing turn in Jane Eyre.

Mia Wasikowska exclusive video interview
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Re: Get to know Mia-Interviews with Mia-Jane Eyre

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:44 pm

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/dailymusto/2011/03/jane_eyre_meets.php

Jane Eyre Meets Alice in Wonderland
By Michael Musto, Thu., Mar. 10 2011 @ 3:00PM

​Rising star Mia Wasikowska had a great year in 2010, as the title character in Tim Burton's eye popping Alice in Wonderland and as the inquisitive daughter in The Kids Are All Right.

And Mia isn't exactly M.I.A. this year either.

She stars in Cary Fukunaga's melancholy, effective version of Jane Eyre and told me she thinks she's the youngest person to play the role on film.

"Cary brought a fresh energy to it," Mia said at the premiere last night. "We felt like kids who'd gotten ahold of a classic work of English literature. We felt very cheeky!"

Her take on Jane is appropriately transitioning yet strong willed.

"In my mind," she said, "Jane was an adult. Then I read the book and the first thing that struck me is that when you first see her, she's 18!

"I was struck by her strength and sense of self."

But technically Mia was already too old for the part.

"I was 19," she told me, smiling, "so I already had a year on her!"

That's OK. Fukunaga loved working with her and hottie costar Michael Fassbender and laughingly told the crowd, "If the Academy proved anything, it's that no one ever gets tired of English accents--so here we are again!"
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