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Director Cary Fukanaga

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Director Cary Fukanaga Empty Director Cary Fukanaga

Post by Admin on Thu Feb 11, 2010 8:06 pm

http://www.papermag.com/?section=article&parid=3505

Director Cary Fukanaga 3505_h10

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Cary Fukunaga has visited so many cities promoting his film Sin Nombre in the past year, he's forgotten where he's been. "I drew a map for my friend of everywhere I've been this year, and I color-coded it by month. Even I was surprised," says the 32-year-old director and screenwriter, whose feature debut about a young Honduran woman headed to the U.S. atop a Mexican freight train and a gang member who becomes her accidental travel companion, won him an award for best director at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. Fukunaga soon begins shooting on an adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre in the U.K. with Michael Fassbender (Fish Tank) and Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland), but first there's another Sin Nombre press trip to Japan. "My life has been a whirlwind since the Thanksgiving that I found out my short film got into Sundance," says Fukunaga, of his first appearance at the film festival in 2005. "Getting into Sundance, especially for a short filmmaker, is the holy grail. I'd seen others before me get in, and waste the opportunity. I had to make the most of it."

That short film, Victoria Para Chino, was made by Fukunaga as a second-year student at NYU's graduate film program. He based his script on a 2003 incident in which the bodies of 17 illegal immigrants who had died of asphyxiation and heat stroke were found in an abandoned trailer near Victoria, Texas. Many aboard the unventilated trailer were from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, and the incident drew national attention to the perilous attempts Central American immigrants make to enter the U.S. -- a theme Fukunaga further explored in Sin Nombre. The Sundance Institute soon invited Fukunaga to submit a feature script to their screenwriter's workshop. He didn't have a script written and scrambled, in two weeks, to create a triptych about teenagers crossing Mexico on freight trains, a common method of transport for Central Americans immigrating north. "It wasn't very good," Fukunaga admits flatly.

He was not accepted to the program, but the seeds for the characters in Sin Nombre were there. After taking a research trip to Mexico that summer, Fukunaga came home, threw out the old script, re-wrote what would become Sin Nombre, and got in.

Fukunaga would make several more trips to Mexico over the next two years as he worked on the script, continuing to interview imprisoned gang members and riding freight trains. Though he was usually accompanied during these journeys, he was alone when a train he was on was attacked by a group of bandits who killed a passenger. "The difference was, I could choose at any point to get off the train and go back to my life. And they can't," Fukunaga says. "It didn't stop me from riding the trains again. It certainly made the surreal aspect of all of the research I'd done, all of the horror stories I'd heard, a reality, rather than something I'd just seen written."

Fukunaga's risky field research paid off. Focus agreed to make Sin Nombre, and, following its screening at Sundance, Fukunaga left Park City with a blind deal offer from Universal and another from Focus, for whom he had already written an adaptation of author Uzodinma Iweala's child soldier novel Beasts of No Nation. Fukunaga owns the book's film rights and says that though it's the best script he's ever written, he doesn't see a green light in the near future given the economic downturn. "It's just a question for when the market would allow for a film like that," he says. "You have to do it at a time that people are willing to watch films that are pretty dark."

Fukunaga is the midst of fulfilling his blind deal with Focus, an operatic musical. Though it's been rumored he approached both Zach Condon (of Beirut), and Owen Pallett (of Final Fantasy) to score the film, Fukunaga says Condon's involvement is unlikely and that Pallett is not attached to the project. "It was a very casual conversation [with Pallett] that got leaked somehow," he says. "But it's not necessarily true. I would love to do it with someone like him." The plot, Fukunaga says, is about a boy and a girl who live in parallel dimensions, in which their only form of communication is through song. "It starts when they're kids and then blossoms into adolescence and eventually they need to touch each other, as firing hormones require. And she finds a way to cross over into his world, with catastrophic results," Fukunaga says, adding that he'd like the plot to be humorous.

That script, however, is on hold while he helms Jane Eyre with Wasikowska in the title role of the shy governess and Michael Fassbender as her brutish employer, Mr. Rochester. Though Fukunaga says he enjoyed the novel, he was mystified by Eyre's "fall[ing] in love with the first guy she spends any time with. That's the thing about that era that doesn't really work any more, That life is so simple that you can just fall in love with your high school sweetheart, that that will fulfill your life."

And though going from Sin Nombre to a starchy period piece seems like an unlikely move for Fukunaga, there's one Victorian theme, albeit morbid, Fukunaga sees as a through line in his work. "All of my movies so far have had kids die. In my short film, a kid dies. In every single one of my films a kid dies," he says. God, I'm probably a f&%$#& up person. I've really got to write a story where someone doesn't die."
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:12 pm

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/oscars/2010/03/qa-sin-nombre-director-cary-fukunaga-on-the-path-to-auteurdom.html

Q&A: Sin Nombre Director Cary Fukunaga on the Path to Auteurdom
by Julian Sancton
March 5, 2010, 4:00 PM
Cary-Fukunaga.jpgPhotograph by Justin Bishop.

Cary Fukunaga, one of Hollywood’s most promising directors, took no short cuts. At 32, he has three degrees—one in history from U.C. Santa Cruz; one from a political institute in Grenoble, France; and one from the N.Y.U.'s graduate film program. In fact, the only nepotistic boost he’ll admit to receiving is the fact that he had a friend whose journalist father knew a professor who knew the head of Mexican state security, who in turn granted Fukunaga access to incarcerated gang members. It was through interviews with those prisoners—as well as his experience joining dozens of other stowaways atop freight trains winding their way to the U.S. border—that Fukunaga developed his script for Sin Nombre, one of our favorite movies of last year.

Sin Nombre, which went on to win the best directing and cinematography awards at Sundance (the base camp of auteurdom), earned Fukunaga rave reviews as well as a first-look deal with Focus Features. Careful not to repeat himself, Fukunaga, who is half Swedish and half Japanese, made sure to follow Sin Nombre up with a very different project: an umpteenth adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, starring Michael Fassbender and Alice in Wonderland’s Mia Wasikowska.

Sin Nombre was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards, including best director and best feature. Awaiting tonight’s ceremony—where he hopes to run into Waskowska—Fukunaga took the time to discuss his education in film, his career plan, and his dream project: a musical take on a Babylonian legend. Seriously.

Sin Nombre was a very personal project from beginning to end. By following that with an adaptation of Jane Eyre, are you abandoning the idea of always being a writer-director?

I did wonder about that. I think there’s a part of you, especially during your first film, that wonders if you’re going to be someone who just writes his own projects. And I wish I wrote that fast, but considering the amount of movies I want to make in the finite time I have to make films, I wont be able to write all my films.

I eventually want to do writing on all the films, but not necessarily to be the writer. Writing is a painful, painful thing, it really is.

What do you find most painful about it?

It’s lonely and you suffer a lot. I’m never more miserable than when I write, and never more happy than having finished and having it sitting in front of me. I have a couple projects I need to write, coming up soon. You know once you start doing it that it’s going to be fine, but that time before you decide you’re going to commit and sit down and start writing...

All of a sudden cleaning your desk and alphabetizing your books sounds a lot more urgent.

Yeah, you’ve got to turn off the Internet, can’t hang out with your friends… Winter is actually a good time to do it because it’s miserable outside.

Can you describe your writing process?

I binge write, basically. I do a lot of prep, research, setup. I’ll have a pretty detailed outline. Sort of like a beat outline. And then I’ll add little notes and dialogue ideas and I’ll just create a 20-page document. Then I’ll sit down, and I’ll decide I’m going to write for ten days straight and I’ll just write ten pages a day and then each day I’ll go over the previous pages that I’ve written and then add ten more pages, not trying to make it perfect, just getting out the ten pages that I need to write for those beats. So by the time I got to the end, those first pages have been worked ten times and everything else will be worked over as we get further along in the process.

So you’re saying the beginnings of your movies are a lot better than the ends?

Well, yeah, maybe. Unless I have a really great idea for the end.


Do you write on Word or on Final Draft?

Final Draft. But I write all my outline thoughts in Word. I’m pen-palling with a friend in Australia, and I’ve been trying to write longhand. I’ve got no more muscle for it. As I wrote, my hand started cramping after like two pages.

Are there any directors or writer-directors that you’d want to model your career after?

I don’t know if there’s any one director.

You must have had an idol when you were a kid.

I’ll definitely say that, before film school, I didn’t have much of a film-history background. I didn’t know much about classic cinema. In fact, before my interview with N.Y.U., I had to watch a few old films just to get an idea of what classic cinema was, because those black-and-white films I was watching with my mom were like popcorn cinema. It definitely wasn’t, like, German neo-realism or something. We had to watch 50 films to go to N.Y.U., and I watched a bunch of silent films then. And I didn’t decide I was going to go until about a month before classes started. Netflix had just come out so I was Netflix-ing all these movies, and watching three movies a day, and watching the silent films on fast-forward to get through it as fast a possible…

They already walked pretty fast in the silent era, if those films are to be believed.

I know! Some of those D.W. Griffith films were like three-and-a-half hours long, but if you just fast-forward it, suddenly it’s only 45 minutes. And it’s hard to watch so many movies at once, but I did really learn to appreciate classic cinema after that. You start to see where contemporary directors are stealing-slash-borrowing from the past. But in terms of careers I look up to… You asked me earlier about writing and not writing, I think definitely I want to be that director who hopefully gets to make a lot of films, and if I do, most likely I won’t be writing them all. um, I’d rather go for having a large um, volume of films by the time I’m dead, then like five auteur films.

So Terrence Malick’s out, I guess?

Right, although I love Terrence Malick's films. Though he’s starting to make more films now these days. But I think Alfonso Cuarón and Ang Lee have had pretty varied careers. The films they make are their films, but you can’t say they’re always doing a certain genre. Like them, I wouldn’t want to be genre-specific. I like the idea of like trying new things, otherwise it’s not that interesting. So, I guess that explains the jump from Mexico to Victorian England.

Cuarón directed a Harry Potter movie. Is it safe to assume you’re doing the next one?

(Laughs.) Right. I do have some ideas for my next film, which I’m pitching to Universal Studios soon, that are just as different. And I was writing a musical for Focus before this.

Are you serious?

Yeah, but it’s presumptuous to think that I could get a musical done in a year.

Are you a fan of musicals?

No, not really, but I love music. I don’t like "musical music" so much.

What’s it about?

It’s about a boy and a girl who are in love with each other, and they both live in parallel dimensions. Her world is like our world and his world is like our world, but they don’t coincide, and the way they’re able to see and hear each other is via singing. But they can’t touch each other, so that’s like the worst thing. So it’s a nod to Pyramus and Thisbe. Do you know the story? [No.] It’s a Babylonian tale about the most beautiful boy in town and the most beautiful girl in town, who are neighbors but their parents hate each other and they can't see each other. But there’s a hole in the wall through which they could talk to each other but they couldn’t touch each other.

But what about…

Yeah, so this was before people knew the concept of glory holes.

Gotcha.

It’s a tragic story: they decided to meet one night, outside of town, under this Mulberry tree. There’s a tigress out there and Thisbe runs away because she’s afraid of the tigress, but she drops her shawl. The tigress comes up to the shawl and starts eating it, and Pyramus thinks she’s been eaten and he thinks it’s his fault for not being there first, as a man should, to make sure everything was safe before she came and saw him. And so he takes his own life, and then Thisbe comes back…

Wait, this is all sounding very familiar now.

Right, well, so this is basically—Shakespeare basically got Romeo and Juliet from this tale.

How are you feeling about the Independent Spirit Awards?
I’m really excited. I hope something happens, because Adriano Goldman, my cinematographer, is nominated, and my producer is nominated. Mia Wasikowska [who is cast as Jane Eyre in Fukunaga’s adaptation] is going to be there because she’s nominated for another film. I have two other friends, who each have their films nominated there, plus their cinematographers. So it going to be a bunch of old friends, hanging out. In the independent world, it’s a good, fun awards ceremony.
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Post by Admin on Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:01 pm

http://www.movieline.com/2010/03/cary-fukunaga-on-jane-eyre.php

Director Cary Fukanaga Caryfu10

Director Cary Fukunaga on the 'Darker Sides' of His Upcoming Jane Eyre

Written by Kyle Buchanan | 10 Mar 2010, 6:40 AM

caryfukunaga-main.jpgThere’s not anything inherently fresh and vital about doing a remake, but Cary Fukunaga’s upcoming take on Jane Eyre may buck that trend. The 32-year-old director of the art house smash Sin Nombre is regarded as one of Hollywood’s most promising new talents, and he’s lined up two other up-and-comers to star in his adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë novel: Alice in Wonderland heroine Mia Wasikowska, and Michael Fassbender of Inglourious Basterds and Fish Tank. This weekend, Fukunaga spoke to Movieline about what he’s got planned for the film.

“I’d known there was a Jane Eyre script out there for a couple of years, and it was one of my favorite movies as a kid,” Fukunaga told me, referring to the 1944 Robert Stevenson-directed version. “When [Sin Nombre] came out in the UK, I took advantage of that to meet with the BBC, and it turned out that there was no director that was attached anymore and the script happened to be amazing.”

Is he daunted by remaking one of his favorite films? Not quite, Fukunaga said. “The Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine version was of an era. You wouldn’t make a film like that anymore. I’m a stickler for raw authenticity, so I’ve spent a lot of time rereading the book and trying to feel out what Charlotte Brontë was feeling when she was writing it. That sort of spookiness that plagues the entire story…there’s been something like 24 adaptations, and it’s very rare that you see those sorts of darker sides. They treat it like it’s just a period romance, and I think it’s much more than that.”

It’s also a very different kind of story from Sin Nombre, an illegal immigrant drama that Fukunaga filmed in Mexico with unknown actors. For a young director still establishing his visual sensibility, Fukunaga admitted that he’ll be expanding his repertoire quite a bit with Eyre.

“It’s a little more thought out,” he said. “On Sin Nombre, [cinematographer] Adriano Goldman and I improvised a lot of things on-site. We were working with untrained actors, and you can’t really block a scene in a traditional way. On this film, we’re working with such pros that can work and hit their mark, so we’re coming up with some interesting ways to shoot the film. It’s all about tension and creating that sense of horror underneath.”

Among those pros is a supporting cast that includes Dame Judi Dench, Jamie Bell, and Sally Hawkins. I asked Fukunaga how it feels to work with actors who aren’t merely trained, but among the most lauded in their field.

“It’s a treat and daunting to be directing someone like Judi Dench, who’s made more films than I’ll ever make in my lifetime.” He laughed. “We don’t start rehearsals until next week, so ask me again then and I can tell you with more authority.”

Jane Eyre begins shooting at the end of the month.
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Post by Admin on Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:19 pm

http://theplaylist.blogspot.com/2010/03/cary-fukunaga-discusses-his-adaptation.html

3/10/2010
Cary Fukunaga Discusses His Adaptation Of 'Jane Eyre'

Cary Fukunaga recently spoke to Movieline about his upcoming adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's "Jane Eyre" which stars Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender.

The helmer revealed a long-burning admiration for Brontë's classic tale which he, upon hearing about a script, jumped at the opportunity to chase down and attach himself to.

“I’d known there was a 'Jane Eyre' script out there for a couple of years, and it was one of my favorite movies as a kid. When ['Sin Nombre'] came out in the U.K., I took advantage of that to meet with the BBC, and it turned out that there was no director that was attached anymore and the script happened to be amazing.”

Fukunaga's take was previously revealed to focus on the tale's darker, more gothic sensibilities but the director now explains that was more out of respect to both the original film and Brontë's vision than any attempt to go "Twilight," not that we'd expected such a thing.

“The Orson Welles-Joan Fontaine version was of an era. You wouldn’t make a film like that anymore. I’m a stickler for raw authenticity, so I’ve spent a lot of time rereading the book and trying to feel out what Charlotte Brontë was feeling when she was writing it. That sort of spookiness that plagues the entire story…there’s been something like 24 adaptations, and it’s very rare that you see those sorts of darker sides. They treat it like it’s just a period romance, and I think it’s much more than that.”

The film's more expansive, better budgeted production will also allow Fukunaga to spread his filmmaking wings, not to mention a supporting cast that boasts names like Judi Dench, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins and Imogen Poots.

“On 'Sin Nombre,' [cinematographer] Adriano Goldman and I improvised a lot of things on-site. We were working with untrained actors, and you can’t really block a scene in a traditional way. On this film, we’re working with such pros that can work and hit their mark, so we’re coming up with some interesting ways to shoot the film. It’s all about tension and creating that sense of horror underneath.”

Shooting on "Jane Eyre" is set to begin later this month and, with a bit of luck, hopefully can make it in time for a late, late 2010 release. It does sound like a potential award season contender even if the new populist ten Best Picture nominations are here to stay for at least three years.

Posted by Simon Dang at 12:35 PM
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 04, 2011 6:21 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/movies/06eyre.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2&src=twrhp

Another Hike on the Moors for ‘Jane Eyre’
Laurie Sparham/Focus Features

By CHARLES McGRATH
Published: March 4, 2011

CARY FUKUNAGA, the director of the new movie version of “Jane Eyre,” which opens Friday, joked recently that there was an unwritten law requiring that “Jane Eyre” be remade every five years. It sometimes feels that way. Of all the classic 19th-century novels, Charlotte Brontë’s “Jane Eyre” has been by far the most filmed, outstripping even the ever-durable “Pride and Prejudice.”

George C. Scott and Susannah York (as Jane Eyre) in the 1970 TV movie “Jane Eyre,” directed by Delbert Mann. More Photos »

So far there have been at least 18 film versions, going back to a 1910 silent movie, and 9 made-for-television “Janes” — so many that they sometimes seem to quote from one another as much as from the novel. Several, including the current one, were even filmed on the same location: Haddon Hall, an ancient, battlemented manor house in wind-swept Derbyshire that gets pressed into service whenever British filmmakers need someplace old and dank looking.

So moviegoers may be forgiven if in recollection all the “Jane Eyres” seem to blend together in one continuous loop, with Joan Fontaine, the 1943 Jane, suddenly becoming colorized and morphing into Susannah York, while Rochester turns, like a character in a horror film, from Orson Welles into George C. Scott and then Timothy Dalton.

Certain moments occur over and over again: the stool at Lowood, the miserable boarding school for orphans; Rochester skidding and falling from his horse; the screams at night, the burning bed chamber; Jane running across the barren countryside; the voice calling her across the moors. And it always ends the same way: She marries him of course, though the movie Rochester is seldom the pitiable, damaged creature he proves to be in the book, where he loses both an eye and a hand.

If there has never been a definitive movie “Jane Eyre,” there has never been a truly rotten one. Even the sentimental 1996 Franco Zeffirelli version, with William Hurt embarrassingly miscast as a Rochester more nearly a mild eccentric than a brooding, Byronic type, has its moments. A couple of the movies have lingered a little on the sultry, Creole ancestry of Rochester’s first wife, Bertha Mason, and on a theme of colonial exploitation, but so far the one truly ground-breaking version is John Duigan’s 1993 film of “Wide Sargasso Sea,” the Jean Rhys novel that tells the story from the point of view of Bertha, the madwoman locked in the attic.

So why another “Jane Eyre,” then, with so many perfectly serviceable ones already available on DVD or download? The simplest answer is that movies get remade all the time, and the great 19th-century novelists — Austen and the Brontë sisters especially — have proved to be an inexhaustible and almost foolproof resource.

Douglas McGrath, who has directed movie versions of both Austen’s “Emma” and “Nicholas Nickleby,” by Charles Dickens, wrote recently in an e-mail message: “What makes a classic a classic is that the story always has relevance to whatever generation is reading it. If it didn’t, it wouldn’t be a classic — it would be forgotten. And I think that what gives them relevance is the human dilemma at the center of it. The period details — the pretty (or not) costumes, the great or dingy houses, the carriage and candlelight and long-lost customs — are all icing, but they are not the cake.”

Talking about classics of romantic literature, he added, “Part of the appeal is that the language still has a rich, sometimes poetic phrasing that a modern film has a tough time matching.”

In the case of “Jane Eyre,” as Alison Owen, who was the producer and driving force behind the new one, pointed out recently, there is also a simple, pragmatic reason: As period costume dramas go, “Jane” is relatively cheap to make.

“It’s set in a house in the middle of a moor,” she explained. “Jane Austen can be quite expensive. You need horses, carriages, houses, gowns. But on the whole ‘Jane Eyre’ is much more starkly peopled than most period movies. You don’t need swaths of costumes. And scenery costs nothing. Point a camera at those moors, and it looks like a David Lean film.”

But a deeper reason for wanting to make the movie, she went on, was simply her affection for the novel, and just about everyone involved in the production, which stars Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, felt much the same way. “Jane Eyre” came out in 1847, a little more than 30 years after “Pride and Prejudice,” and yet as Mr. Fukunaga pointed out, a world of difference separates the two books.

“Jane Austen is like ‘Gossip Girl,’ and Charlotte and Emily were like Goth twins,” he said. “It’s a totally different sensibility. The emotional world that Charlotte inhabited is much darker and more dangerous.”

It’s also a world that modern readers may more readily identify with. The story of an orphan who becomes a governess, sticks up for herself and finds true love in a spooky, haunted-seeming mansion, all the while pouring her heart out on the page in prose that is lush, romantic, almost hypnotic, “Jane Eyre,” is both a Gothic horror story and arguably the first and most satisfying chick-lit novel.

“It’s been my favorite book since I was 11 or so, and I’ve always felt that it has been under-served by the movies.” Ms. Owen said. “One reason is that Jane has so often been cast as an older woman, not a girl. But it’s not written from that viewpoint, which is why it so appeals to young girls. It makes a huge difference to have someone in the part who is pre-womanhood. Mia was 19 when we made this, which is exactly Jane’s age.”

Moira Buffini, who wrote the screenplay, recalled recently that when she heard Ms. Owen was remaking “Jane Eyre,” she immediately said to herself, “Oh, my God.” She went on: “It was instinctive. I just chased the job.”

And only after she got the job did she discover how to go about it. “I started off going from A to Z, dramatizing every important scene,” she said. “Each one is 8, 9, 10 pages of dense prose, and trying to distill all that, I realized before I got to the end of the first draft that this wasn’t going to work.” That’s when she hit on the idea of telling the story mostly in flashback, beginning with Jane’s yearlong stay with the sanctimonious missionary St. John Rivers and his sisters, an interval that comes quite late in the book and that most films either compress or leave out altogether.

“That’s such an important part of the book,” she explained. “Jane spends a whole year there, agonized with longing, and that’s when she begins to see what the alternative to Rochester is: a loveless marriage or spinsterhood. It’s a sort of spiritual journey, and it tells you so much about that world, where people with great souls had to struggle with small lives.”

Mr. Fukunaga, a 33-year-old American, also sought after this “Jane Eyre,” even though he had made only one other feature, “Sin Nombre,” a movie filmed in Spanish about Central Americans trying to make their way illegally into the United States, and which he researched by personally riding freight trains with illegal immigrants.

“Filmmaking is a gamble,” Ms. Owen said about choosing him, adding that she had been partly guided by her experience in making the Cate Blanchett biopic “Elizabeth,” which was directed by Shekhar Kapur. “It proved a great success to have a director from a different culture,” she said. “I didn’t want to go the establishment route, because sometimes they’re a little cowed by English history and too worried about being faithful to the Brontës. You need to shake things up a bit.”

Mr. Fukunaga grew up watching Robert Stevenson’s 1943 black-and-white version with his mother. That one (which was partly written by Aldous Huxley) is the most literary of all the “Janes” — it begins with pages turning over and actual prose from the book in voice-over — and also the one that tilts most heavily in Rochester’s direction, with a swarthy-looking Orson Welles mumbling and declaiming in Brando-esque fashion and leaving Joan Fontaine with little to do except look dewey eyed. But Mr. Fukunaga said that what he learned from it was the importance of balancing the various elements of the story.

“Do you make this a standard period romance drama?” he said. “Do you make it a horror film? How do you walk the line between the two? In literature, because of the scale, you can shift tones and atmospheres. You can almost shift genres. But in a movie it’s a balancing act. That’s why I revere the Bob Stevenson version.” He added, “I guess it will be up to fans who are keen judges of adaptations to say if I’ve succeeded.”

Everyone involved with the production agrees that Ms. Wasikowka’s performance was crucial. It was also fortuitous. “They did suggest another actress,” Ms. Buffini said. “I won’t say who, but it was someone I felt was going to be less exciting.”

Ms. Wasikowska, as it happened, had just finished filming Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland,” and had returned to her native Australia with a reading list of books she hoped to catch up on. “Jane Eyre” was at the top, and after just five chapters she called her agent and asked if there were any scripts in development.

“What I loved about Jane is that she has this innate sense of self-respect, and there’s really nowhere it should have come from,” she said. “It’s not like she had a loving upbringing. Everything she has achieved, it’s because she made it for herself.”

Ms. Owen said: “The reason so many people love ‘Jane Eyre’ is that they can identify with her. She’s not beautiful. She’s small and plain, and yet she finds romantic happiness. It’s a fairy tale for the insecure and unconfident — the ordinary woman.”
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Post by Admin on Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:29 pm

http://www.ifc.com/news/2011/03/cary-fukunaga.php

Cary Fukunaga Brings a Light Touch to "Jane Eyre"
Our video interview with the director of the new adaptation of the classic novel.
Posted 03/07/2011 300 PM by Matt Singer

Photo: Cary Fukunaga (left) on the set of "Jane Eyre," Focus Features, 2011.

I was a big fan of Cary Fukunaga's "Sin Nombre" but if you had asked me what I would expect to see from Fukunaga next, I wouldn't have predicted him to follow his modern story of South American immigrants and gang violence with a romantic period piece like an adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel "Jane Eyre." So I started our recent interview with the question: how did "Jane Eyre" become his second film? "It wasn't like: 'I'm definitely making 'Jane Eyre' next,'" Fukunaga replied. "But the script was so good, and the idea of doing a period film was so exciting. And the fact that it was so different from 'Sin Nombre' was also, for me, really attractive."

"Attractive" is a perfect word to describe Fukunaga's version of "Jane Eyre." Its stars, Mia Wasikowska as Jane and Michael Fassbender as her employer Mr. Rochester, are as easy on the eyes as the film's gorgeous cinematography by Adriano Goldman. Much of the film is set at night in the murky halls of Rochester's estate. Many scenes look like they were lit entirely by candles and fireplaces in the mad tradition of Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon." I couldn't resist the opportunity to ask Fukunaga about the gorgeous lighting techniques and to discuss where he found the modern relevance in an 150-year-old novel.
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Post by Admin on Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:03 pm

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/interview_cary_joji_fukunaga_talks_the_horror_and_romance_of_jane_eyre/

Cary Fukunaga Talks His Horror’/Romance Take On ‘Jane Eyre’ With Michael Fassbender & Mia Wasikoska

Indie Filmmaker Also Discusses His Gestating Musical With Owen Pallet, His African Civil War Drama ‘Beasts Of No Nation,’ & His Good Filmmaking Fortune So Far

Exclusive: Delighting fans of period romance everywhere—and kids who can’t be bothered with even the Cliffs Notes of the classic Charlotte Brontë novel—”Jane Eyre” is making another appearance on screen. But rather than coming from a predictably English pedigree, the 2011 Focus Features version arrives from the seemingly unlikely source of Cary Fukunaga, a young American director with a single feature to his name, 2009’s gritty immigration thriller “Sin Nombre.” Fukunaga went young with his casting, opting for Mia Wasikoska (”The Kids Are All Right”) to play to the title role, while Michael Fassbender (”Hunger,” the dreams of many a female Playlister) takes on the brooding part of Edward Rochester.

For those who have skipped previous versions—and class—“Jane Eyre” traces the life of a plain, bright orphan from her time with a cruel aunt (Sally Hawkins here) through her adolescence at a harsh boarding school that would have made Dickens proud, as well as a stint as a teacher at the school of a would-be missionary (Jamie Bell). The meat of the novel (and film adaptations) centers on her time at Thornfield Hall, where she serves as governess with a mysterious, oft-absent master in Rochester and a chatty companion in Mrs. Fairfax (Judi Dench). The house appears haunted, with strange howls emitting from seemingly vacant rooms, casting a strange light on the growing romance between the gruff Rochester and his quiet but headstrong employee. We were lucky enough to sit down with Fukunaga recently to discuss what brought him to the frequently adapted story and where things stand with that
The Playlist: So what drew you to “Jane Eyre”? It’s been made numerous times before.
Cary Fukunaga: Yeah, I thought just, “Why not one more time?” It feels like it’s made every five years, and 2006 was the last one, so 2011 makes sense to make another one. It’s my turn—do it. It really was one of those things where I was aware of the Bob Stevenson version of film from 1944. I was not aware of the 26 other ones that were there. I knew that it had been made a couple of times, but I didn’t realize it was that many times and that the BBC had just done one. But I watched it and I kinda felt happy that I knew I wasn’t making that version of the film, so it was okay.

What sets your film apart?
Toby Stephens was great [in the 2006 BBC version]...See, I watched a few episodes of it, and then I couldn’t do any more. It was because…I heard it got better once you got to the middle of it, but the first few? I was just all in the desert, the Red Room, weird quirky camera pushing it out with like a red filter, I was like, ‘What is this? What’s going on?’ But I respect Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens. And even Michael [Fassbender] who watched a bunch of it said that he really liked what Toby did in that series, so I should one day probably watch it, but I didn’t want to be too influenced either. I didn’t want to do things to be different just to be different either. And some things after I shot the film, I saw what they did, and it dawned, I’m like, ‘Oh yeah, we did the same thing.’ I remember one day I was having lunch or dinner at Pizza Express, which is the chain pizza that’s all over England. And we were shooting in Buxton and a bunch of the horse stunts guys were there, and this old guy, sort of the curmudgeonly old man was like, ‘Been watching what you’ve been doing. And pretty much every shot is like every other “Jane Eyre” I’ve seen, except for this one thing you did. That was pretty good.” And I’m like, “Oh, thanks.” .... Because he basically, the same horse crew had been on the previous three “Jane Eyre"s since the early ‘90s.

Why did you want to make this the follow-up to “Sin Nombre”? It’s such a different film.
I had another script, this child soldier script that didn’t end up going [ed.note: a drama based on the experiences of a child soldier fighting in the civil war of an unnamed African country called, “Beasts of No Nation”]. I was working on a musical while I was on my international press tour for Sin Nombre, and I ended up in England and I just really wanted to do a film there, and I really wanted to do one quick. Because I knew that my musical wasn’t going to happen quickly. I was just really trying to make it something, and I’m still trying to work on it when I have time, but something different, and everything I was coming up with just seemed so trite and pedestrian. I just wasn’t happy with it, and I didn’t want to rush anything, so I was open to the idea of doing a script that wasn’t my own, and previous to that, I had wanted to possibly adapt Jane Eyre because the Bob Stevenson version was a favorite of mine when I was a kid. So when I found out the BBC had the script, I met with them. I read the script, liked the script, met with the writer and producer and it was like going. And my experience with “Sin Nombre” was so slow. When Focus [Features] acquired the script and we decided we were going to make the film, it still took like a year and a half before we made the film. So I didn’t think it was going to happen so quickly. You know what I mean? I was like, “Hey, let’s do it. Let’s make ‘Jane Eyre.’” And they’re like, “Okay, we’re starting pre-production now.” And I was like, “Oh really? We’re really going to make the film now?” I just couldn’t believe it was happening. I was just totally catching up with it ‘cause I was still doing “Sin Nombre” press up until two weeks before we started shooting, so I never really got a break.

It’s exhausting.
It is exhausting. I definitely went into the film tired, but I also went into the film really excited to be making another movie. It was just exciting to have just a really amazing script actors to work with, too. Everything just fell into place. I better knock on wood [knocks] because I think things have been just too easy. I don’t want ‘em to get hard, but the way “Sin Nombre” happened—I mean, obviously the research was very difficult, and it was dangerous, and it was a whole adventure, but getting the film made, but I never had to pitch “Sin Nombre” to anyone. Focus read the script and wanted to option it, and then the child soldier script I wrote, same thing. When I was in Focus as they’re asking me if I wanted to make the film there, I was leaving the building with the book of the child soldier script that I wanted to adapt, and another executive was like, “I really want to make that into a movie. It’s amazing you have that book in your hand.” And I’m like, “Oh yeah, I really want to make this into a movie, too.” He’s like, “I’m going to Berlin for the film festival, but when I come back, let’s get going on the rights.” And I’m like, “Oh, okay.” And then I’m like, whatever, he’s not going to call, and then literally like two days later, my agent was like, “Did you have some book in your hand at Focus Features? Because they want to adapt that, too.” So basically I got that deal just by having a book in my hand, and then the same thing with Jane Eyre. I don’t mean to sound so flippant about it, but literally I was just like, “Let’s make it.” And then literally the next day I’m making phone calls for casting, and Fassbender signed on, and then Mia signed on, and Dame Judi [Dench] signed on, and Jamie Bell, and I’m like, “Whoa, this is nuts. We’re making the movie.” We’re on our way to Northern England to look at castles and stuff, and I don’t have a place to live yet. So whatever’s next, right now I’ve decided that I’m not doing another film for a little while because I’m just a little worried about signing onto anything too quickly, and I’m just writing. I just want to write. I like to write and I like to have my own projects, too, so that’s what’s next.

Can you talk about the musical at all? Where it is with Beirut?
You know, I talked to Owen Pallett [violinist of the Arcade Fire and Final Fantasy] as well, and I havent talked to [Beirut band member] Zach [Condon] in years. It was a long time ago we talked about it, and then Owen—I met Owen a couple of times, and then Patrick, who’s his manager and boyfriend. We always talk about it, but he’s doing like 50 million things, and I’ve been doing “Jane Eyre,” so it’s always like, “Yeah, yeah, still interested,” but we haven’t done anything yet. For me, it’s like my work first. I have to write the story, and then we can start to work together on what the music could be. I still think Owen’s one of the most amazing composers out there, and I think he’d be perfect for this once I have something, but I can’t say that we’re working on it, because we’re not really working on anything together until I have a script, and then maybe it’s not just him, maybe it’s him and three or four other people that we’re collaborating with, I don’t even know yet what the music’s gonna be. I’m still trying to figure out the tone and all that stuff. So, hopefully, you know. It was literally just like initial meetings. I probably shouldn’t have said anything. [smiles]

Has there been any movement on the sci-fi/time travel film?
Yeah, actually, I just talked to Focus about that recently ‘cause I’m supposed to be writing the musical first for Focus, but I have this story that I really want to write. I know this story much more for the time travel one. It’s not time travel, it’s light speed travel. It’s not going back in time, just going forward. It’s really just about finding the time to write that, so that’s one of the things I’m writing next, the musical, and there was one other thing I was going to be writing next…. Meh, we’ll see.

So you really—not to say that you got lucky because it sounds like there was a ton of talent and thought there—but both Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska have just blown up over the last year. Did you kind of expect that it was going to be that kind of trajectory, or did you just really like them?
I just really liked them. I wasn’t really thinking about whether they’d be bankable as movie stars at all, just raw talent. ‘Cause I saw Fassbender in “Hunger,” and I just really wanted to work with him. Jamie Bell, years ago, saw him and wanted to work with him. It was kind of dreamy in a sense that all these people that I wanted to work with, I got to put into one film. And now I’ve pretty much worked with everyone I wanted to work with. Like for right now, except for maybe like Ben Whishaw, a bunch of other actors, but there was this core—Dame Judi, Jamie Bell, Michael Fassbender, Mia Wasikowska, Sally Hawkins—that I literally got to work with in one movie, and I wish I could’ve used them more. I wish I could’ve had much more of Sally, much more of Dame Judi. Sally Hawkins was amazing by the way, and she is only like in two scenes in the movie. I wish we could’ve done so much more because she’s such an amazing actress.

How did you think to cast her in such a…a very human role, but she’s very villainous, which never would have occurred to me from the things I’ve seen her in.
Well, ‘cause I saw her in “Happy Go Lucky,” in Mike Leigh’s film, and I just wanted to shake her because she was so nice. I wanted to see the other side of her, and I knew that there had to be something like that there. And she’s actually much more like the “Happy Go Lucky” character in real life, ‘cause she’s just so goofy and, I don’t know, she’s really special. But I knew that she could do that dark, stepmom kind of thing, too. She just has that face that looks she could be nice to the outside world. And the way I imagined Mrs. Reed was that everyone thinks she’s nice because she’s charming, but when the doors close, she turns around and there’s that devil crawling around her neck kind of thing. I thought she could do that. And Jamie also, was just so awesome to work with. It was so nice to have him on the first two weeks of shooting ‘cause he just brings so much. The kid’s like an acrobat….

So you’ve done two movies now that have had really strong, female protagonists at their centers. Is that intentional?
Just working out the young woman inside of me. I don’t know where that came from. it’s total coincidence. I could say on an intellectual level, “Oh you know, I really like these themes of someone looking for a home.” Essentially all my stories are about someone looking for a home, family. But I didn’t mean for it to be two girls at the same time, basically adolescent girls looking for a home, love. That just was a coincidence I guess, unless I need to go to therapy and find out what it’s for.

So this definitely focuses a bit more on the Gothic and the darker elements than some of the previous adaptations. Was that present in the script, or was that something that you kind of chose to do?
That’s present in the novel, I feel like. I think the Bob Stevenson version is one of the rarer versions that actually does really stay more in that pre-Gothic in that, it’s at the earlier end of the Victorian era. It has that sort of foreboding isolation, that dense fog, what’s beyond the moors in this isolated house, what’s beyond this tapestry in this wall, those creaky noises upstairs. It has that feeling in the book. And we just definitely wanted to do that. The question then becomes, how far do you go into the world of horror, or how much do you stay in the world of period drama/romance, while maintaining that tone. And that was the tricky part for me, really looking at the script—a scene, a scene, a scene—trying to be consistent with that. Because if you try to go horror and go too much horror, it takes away from the romance; it literally does. There were scenes we took out of the film because if you balance out the overall experience of it by going to this moment of potential horror, like Bertha Mason ripping the veil, for example. If you do it right, it takes away from the following scene where Rochester is reasserting his love for [Jane] and that everything is going to be fine once they’re married and away. And you kind of need that relationship to work by the latter part of the film. So that was the hard part, taking out bits of horror that we did shoot in order to balance out the romance story so that neither one felt really half-baked. There was actually some sort of complete execution of the one sentiment.

Do you think that the trailer is pushing the darker-side of things?
Definitely, definitely. I tell my friends, “It’s not that scary.”

“Jane Eyre” opens in select theaters on Friday.
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Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:46 am

http://www.nyunews.com/arts/2011/03/10/10eyre/

Director, star imagine a darker "Jane Eyre"

by Sam Kressner

Published March 10, 2011

Picture a bitter spring morning in the English countryside. Now picture a film crew trying to set up for the day's scenes, those same rolling meadows being pummeled in a damp torrent of wind and rain.

Director Cary Fukunaga expected to deal with the elements when he shot "Jane Eyre."

"We have what I thought would be a guerilla-style crew," he said. "All hands on deck, moving [film] magazines back from the trailer on the road to the camera. And we're changing the cases. Everyone's hustling."

Fukunaga, an alumnus of Tisch's graduate filmmaking program, is accustomed to battling adverse conditions. In researching his first feature "Sin Nombre," a border-crossing travelogue of émigrés bound for the Mexican-American border atop a Honduran locomotive, Fukunaga traveled with Central American villagers under the continuous threat of barbarous gangs.

But on the set of his latest feature, different elements prevailed.

"I look over," Fukunaga continued, "and there's four out of the 20 English crew members dedicated to maneuvering the tea table, the cloth flapping, fighting against gale force winds — all to make sure it was set up behind a rock so tea time would not be interrupted."

Charlotte Brontë's seminal Gothic romance tells the story of a young girl who is inculcated with religious doctrine and abuse in an all-girls rectory. The eponymous orphaned governess finds a home tending to the Thornfield estate, where she captures the eye of its suspiciously brooding owner, Mr. Rochester. The intelligent and prickly Jane does all she can to not fall prey to her superior.

With more than 25 film and TV adaptations of the novel — including the 1943 Hollywood version directed by Robert Stevenson, starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine — Fukunaga stressed the importance of capturing the novel's more sinister undertones in this his first studio feature: mixing a mounting terror into the chemistry between Jane (Mia Wasikowska, "Alice in Wonderland") and Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender).

"If I wanted to tell Brontë's story completely, I had to stick with something being not quite right; it couldn't just be a standard historical stately drama," Fukunaga said.

"Cary and I liked the idea of bringing out a darker side of the story and also a younger side to Jane because she really is a teenager," said Wasikowska, who is only 21 years old herself.

Tailor-made for the part with her pale complexion and ethereal grace, Wasikowska discussed the fortuitous circumstances that led to getting the role.

"I finished 'Alice' and I'd just gone home to Australia," she said. "I had a period of time before I went back to school, so I made a list of books and 'Jane Eyre' was on it. I started reading it and was captivated. I asked my agent if there was a script floating around, and about a month or two later I, by chance, was asked to meet with Cary for the part."

Like Jane, Wasikowska comes across as genuine, lacking a litany of recycled press-designated answers. She picks her words carefully.

"One of the great aspects of reviving these classic stories is they often reflect the society and the culture producing them, and even in ways we don't realize until time has passed," she said.
And thanks to Fukunaga's reimagining of the story and Wasikowska's interpretation of its protagonist, the latest adaptation will remind audiences of just why Brontë's story is still relevant.

A version of this article appeared in the Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:02 pm

http://www.nbcmiami.com/blogs/popcornbiz/Jane-Eyre-Director-Cary-Fukunaga-117706738.html

We Talk Homelessness and "Jane Eyre" With Director Cary Fukunaga

At the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, writer-director Cary Fukunaga emerged as the belle of the ball, the kind of promising young talent the festival is meant to catapult, when his first feature, "Sin Nombre," a harrowing, haunting tale of unexpected beauty and unflinching realism, took home both the Directing Award and Excellence in Cinematography Award (it also landed Fukunaga a three-picture deal with Focus Features).

Two years later, on the lip of releasing his second effort, a gothic, chillingly sensual adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" starring Mia Wasikowska, Judi Dench and Michael Fassbender (opening this Friday), the young director marvels at how much and yet how little has changed since he trod the same paths promoting "Sin Nombre."

"I was still doing promotion up until two weeks before shooting 'Jane Eyre' and I'm homeless at the moment," he tells PopcornBiz. "I had an apartment in London until two days after [the' Jane Eyre'] shoot. Then I packed up and sent my stuff to the Focus Features office. They're my Manhattan mini-storage."

While the constant stream of work is a dream come true for any independent filmmaker, it's kept Fukunaga from focusing on writing potential future projects that have been simmering in his brain for several years, including (and in order of important in his mind) a sci-fi love story, an adaptation of a historical non-fiction novel about a train heist during the Civil War, and a movie musical that could feature a score by Beirut and Arcade Fire.

"I'm not Quentin Tarantino; I can't write on the road," he shrugs when asked about his procrastination. "I need a little space I can just disappear into. That's probably what I'll do in the spring; find some quiet place, some nice mothering woman to take care of me and feed me soup while I write and cry like a baby," he smiles.

With his sophomore effort arriving in theaters, we couldn't pass up the opportunity to ask about the film's leading man, Michael Fassbender, and his uncanny ability to get everyone, even horses, hot and bothered.

"I don't know," he laughs. "I definitely didn't find myself getting hard-ons during dialogue scenes, I'll tell you that. But Dame Judi [Dench]. Talk about 'boner!' She's so cool," he coos. "When I moved into my flat in London, she gave me a gift. It was the last photograph of Steve McQueen before he died. And Steve had signed it for her! She gave it to me, just pulled it off her wall and gave it to me. That's the kind of person Judi Dench is."

"Jane Eyre" opens this Friday, March 11.
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Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 4:43 pm

http://www.starpulse.com/news/Evan_Crean/2011/03/10/q_and_a_cary_fukunaga_and_mia_wasikows

Q&A: Cary Fukunaga And Mia Wasikowska Dish On 'Jane Eyre,' Working With Judi Dench, And More
March 10th, 2011 2:40pm EST

Cary FukunagaYou may remember director Cary Fukunaga’s 2009 hit Sundance film “Sin Nombre,” for its vivid depiction of class struggles in Central America, but even if you don’t recall it, you most likely know actress Mia Wasikowska, who has starred in movies like Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland” and the 2010 Best Picture Nominee “The Kids Are All Right.”

Fukunaga’s latest project “Jane Eyre,” is yet another adaptation of the classic Charlotte Bronte novel by the same name, about a shy governess (Mia Wasikowska) who falls in love with her employer, a charming man (Michael Fassbender) with secrets. What may set this particular version apart is the darker focus of the story, emphasis on class divisions and performances from talented actors like Wasikowska, Fassbender, and Judi Dench.

This week, I had the opportunity to participate in a roundtable interview with both Cary Fukunaga and Mia Wasikowska. My group had a chance ask them about the film, about working with a veteran actress like Judi Dench, and about life on the road promoting films.

Q: What was it that drew you to “Jane Eyre?” Was it the story or the location?

Cary Fukunaga: I’ve certainly never been dying to go to England my entire life. It’s just one of those things that sort of happened. I love the story and I happened to be in the UK promoting “Sin Nombre” and I had a general meeting with the BBC and found out it was on their slate, and that’s how I crossed paths with it.

Prior to that I hadn’t really thought about taking on someone else’s story or screenplay, but it’s a classic. It seemed like a really interesting sort of second film, rather than spending another year or two developing the one I was already writing so it gave me the opportunity to direct another feature, which was another attractive part about it…

Q: It’s a story that’s been told 27 times…

CF: How many of them have you actually seen though?

(Laughter)

CF: I had no idea. When I signed on I knew about the black and white one and that’s it. And as I sort of started to do the research on the other ones, I kind of got addicted to that world, that style of world; I was amazed there were so many versions of the film. I was floored there were so many versions of the film.

I’ve gone to press screenings and they’ve said the movie has been made every 5 years if you average it out, and I have no doubt that it will probably be made again. Why? It’s the same question of why we do anything again with movies and plays. Shakespeare is repeated around the world in different languages, just because it’s good storytelling. At this point it’s a classic.

Mia Wasikowska: And classics are always relevant.

Q: Mia, were you at all intimidated to work with Judi Dench?

MW: Yeah. She instantly disarms you so the intimidation doesn’t last long, but she has a really young spirit, so she’s really modern and friendly, just so cool. She’d go missing and you’d find her in the corner making shadow puppets in the light, she’s really a lot of fun.

CF: Either that or her sewing or knitting, with what needlepoint?

MW: Yeah.

Q: Cary, how long did it take you to find the right Mr. Rochester?

CF: He (Michael Fassbender) was the first person that we thought about in my initial meeting with the producer and the writer to come up with ideas. I had seen him about a year before or about nine months before in ‘Hunger’ and I had probably seen him before but wasn’t aware of it. So after seeing him in that role, when I read the script, I thought of him.

Q: What makes him the right Rochester for you Mia?

MW: He has qualities of being both potentially dangerous and also really vulnerable, and loving. So it’s the right mix of excitement, and fear, and challenge. As an actor it’s so easy to work opposite him because you can completely believe it. It’s just so natural.

Michael Fassbender

Q: In some of your roles you’ve acted in a very enclosed space. What’s the difference between acting in something like that and acting in something more expansive?

MW: The thing is with 'In Treatment' we had the luxury of really long takes and that’s what those scenes provide. I loved doing the scenes with Michael (Fassbender) around the fireplace, because so often acting is about action and then cut. You have to sort of get an energy for a certain amount of time and it’s dropped. And action again and then drop. With 'In Treatment' we would roll for like 7 pages at a time which was like 10 to 15 minutes. That is so rare. I’ve never done that since, rolling for such a long amount of time. There’s something about living in that space, for that amount of time, that allows you to explore things that you’re not normally allowed to with films that are so fractured and broken up.

Q: Do you feel like that gives you more dynamic range with where you can take your character?

MW: Yeah with films usually you’re jumping from this to that; this is how she feels now and then the time in between the audience doesn’t see that change. Now she feels differently the next time you see her. With 'In Treatment' it’s a half an hour in the same space. In the end you know why she feels like that because you’ve lived everything in between, and in film you never live the in-between; the stuff that seems to boring to include, and that’s a great luxury.

Q: I read that both of your parents are photographers and that you dabble a bit yourself. Did you take any interesting snapshots while you were on set for this film?

MW: Yeah I had a lot of fun taking pictures for this film. We have such an interesting perspective as actors because a lot of the behind the scenes photography is taken from the outside looking in at the clump of people setting up shots. It dawned on me that my inside perspective being in the middle of everything is really interesting seeing all of the compositions. So I keep a camera in my pocket, and on ‘Jane’ the costume department often put a little pocket in my dress, so I had my sneaky camera. It was great. You can get such an interesting view.

Q: Mia what’s the experience like on the road promoting a film like this?

MW: It’s a big contrast from being on the film set. It’s a really interesting side bubble that everyone experiences I think, including the directors and the rest of the cast. It’s fun. I get to see the different parts of America that I’ve never seen before and it’s really cool being able to travel. It’s strange because it’s been a year since we shot 'Jane' and with 'Alice' it had been two years since we shot it, so it would be like going back in time, and you talk about something which seems like a long time ago but it’s only sort of becoming present.

Q: Do the times on the road affect how you think about the production?

MW: Kind of because when you’re shooting the film you don’t really know what it’s going to be. You sort of have an idea of what it’s going to be and then when you see the posters and the trailers, you’re like ‘so okay that’s what this is.’ Interesting. It’s a continuation of something you thought ended, but didn’t.

“Jane Eyre” opens in theaters tomorrow.
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Post by Admin on Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:43 pm

http://www.gregvellante.com/bringing-jane-eyre-to-life-again/

Bringing “Jane Eyre” to life…again

Interviews | 09. Mar, 2011 by Greg Vellante

“Jane Eyre,” the classic novel by Charlotte Brontë, has been adapted into film a whopping 27 times. But Cary Fukunaga, a writer/director whose body of work only included one major film—2009’s critically acclaimed “Sin Nombre”—decided to take on the famous tale for his second project.

Writer/Director Cary Fukunaga

“It’s a classic,” said Fukunaga, “and seemed like a pretty interesting second film rather than spending another year or two developing the one I was already writing.”

But why do a film that has been done so many times before? Fukunaga admitted of having prior knowledge of only one film adaptation of “Jane Eyre” upon signing onto the project.

“As I started to do research, I was amazed there were so many versions,” said the director. “I have no doubt it will probably be made again. Why? I mean it’s the same question as to why we do anything in repeat. Shakespeare is repeated around the world in different languages, just because it is good storytelling.”

The director found a rising starlet for the title role; Mia Wasikowska, who in recent years appeared as the title character in Tim Burton’s blockbuster “Alice in Wonderland” and in “The Kids Are All Right,” a nominee for Best Picture at this year’s Academy Awards. Wasikowska also was intimidated when she realized the story has a generous history of adaptation.

“I didn’t watch any, actually,” said Wasikowska on her familiarity with the previous films. “I was partially overwhelmed at how many there were, I didn’t know where to start, and I also didn’t want to be influenced by anything.”

As for her first introduction to Brontë’s novel, the actress said, “I was always aware of it, but I hadn’t actually read it until I picked it up in 2009 and started reading it. And I was halfway through and thought it was really incredible, and I just wanted to play the character.”

By becoming the lead in “Jane Eyre,” as in “Alice in Wonderland,” Wasikowska has embodied two of literature’s most well known female protagonists. When comparing these characters with that of original creation, such as her performance in “The Kids Are All Right,” the actress found a noticeable difference between the two types of roles.

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre

“With original material and an original character, the audience is going to take it for what you give them,” said Wasikowska. “When you are dealing with a character like Jane or Alice, they are so well known by people, and so engrained in people’s minds, and they’ve lived for such a long time. There’s a bit more risk in terms of whether people will accept your interpretation.”

The cast of “Jane Eyre” also includes veteran actress Judi Dench. On working alongside Dench, Wasikowska called the actress “a young spirit” and someone who is “so cool” to work with.

“There are some people who just got it, and I don’t think you can really define it,” said Fukunaga on Dench. “It’s a charisma that is just so immediate.”

Another actor sharing the screen with Wasikowska is Michael Fassbender, playing Jane Eyre’s love interest Mr. Rochester. Previously seen in films like “300” and “Inglourious Basterds,” this year will bring major recognition to the actor not only for “Jane Eyre,” but for his role as a young Magneto in the anticipated “X-Men: First Class.”

Michael Fassbender as Rochester

“He has the qualities of being both potentially dangerous and also very vulnerable and loving,” said Wasikowska on Fassbender. “It’s the right mix of excitement and fear and challenge. As an actor, it is so easy to work opposite him, because you can believe it. He’s just so natural.”

Wasikowska mentioned that she likes to be “challenged by” acting, and commented on the various challenges that came with being a part of “Jane Eyre.”

“The costumes were a big constraint; they were a blessing and a curse,” said Wasikowska. “It was good to understand the repression that women were under at that time, and what that would feel like, and that was such a huge part and such a metaphor for society and the way that women were treated then. So that was useful…and then also painful.”

But the actress said the “biggest challenge during rehearsals” was the language of Brontë’s prose, not only for her but for Fassbender as well.

“It is very ornate, and poetic, and unlike the language that we use today. Every word is so specific, and there was a lot of decoding,” said the actress.

The question now is whether or not the newest adaptation of “Jane Eyre,” which opens in theaters next weekend, will garner a positive response from the movie going public. Like Fukunaga said, “it’s a classic.”

“And classics are always relevant,” added Wasikowska.

Greg Vellante is a film critic for The Eagle Tribune.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:11 am

http://columbiachronicle.com/fukunaga-tries-hand-at-classic-book/

Fukunaga tries hand at classic book
‘Sin Nombre’ director takes on traditional British literature in newest film

Charlotte Bronte’s 1847 novel “Jane Eyre” is one of England’s most famous and enduring novels. There have been more than 20 film and stage adaptations of the story and few stray far from the text. For this reason, new interpretations often feel dated and unnecessary.

The latest director to try his hand at “Jane Eyre” is Cary Fukunaga, an up-and-coming filmmaker whose previous work is about as far removed from British classicism as possible. His gritty first film, “Sin Nombre” is a bleak look at the inner workings of a violent Mexican gang.

Unsurprisingly, not an ounce of that film’s style has made it into “Jane Eyre.”

Fukunaga’s adaptation sticks closely to the novel: Jane Eyre—played by Mia Wasikowska—is an orphan sent to a stringent boarding school at a young age by her spiteful aunt. Upon her graduation, Jane finds employment as a tutor at the Thornfield Manor, owned by the wealthy
Mr. Rochester—played by Michael Fassbender. The two quickly fall in love despite a dark secret Rochester has kept for years.
With its multitude of adaptations, it’s safe to say “Jane Eyre” has been done to death. So almost by necessity, when a director decides to take a shot, he or she has to infuse the story with new life and new perspectives.

Otherwise, it’s pure regurgitation.

As a follow up to his debut, “Jane Eyre” is a decidedly more refined effort that sees Fukunaga reorienting his mis en scene to employ a less chaotic feel. Static shots and intricately defined frames replace the frenzied, handheld camera movements of “Sin Nombre.” The film’s visual style, though frequently beautiful, matches the tone of the novel a bit too complacently—though not for a lack of trying.

There’s distinct disconnect between the style and tone of the film, which can be described as erratic at best. Despite a visual sophistication, there’s a lurid unease that hovers around parts of the narrative. In scenes that depict Jane’s early childhood in an unloving home and stern boarding school, Fukunaga seems to set up a film that will explore the novel’s darker sides.

Unfortunately, he quickly abandons this approach in favor of a more conventional interpretation. His exploration of the novel’s instilled themes—such as classicism and morality—are redundantly comparable to those of other directors.

For all his effort, the film does little in the way of separating itself from other incarnations. Not helping matters is Wasikowska’s uninspired performance. As the titular Jane Eyre, the young actress significantly underplays a role that depends heavily on emotiveness.

In her defense, it’s a tough role to tackle. Underestimate the text and the performance is tiresome; overemphasize, and you run the risk of caricature. British literature is a foul wench.

The film’s silver lining comes in Fukunaga’s growing prowess as a filmmaker. With “Jane Eyre,” he proves to have a keen eye for visual expression. He absolutely revels in the widescreen format. Virtually every inch of the screen is calculatedly designed, following the cinematic rule of thirds to obsessive precision.

It’s an impressive stylistic step forward for Fukunaga. His ability to harness two divergent filmic styles—the frenetic realism of “Sin Nombre” and the more deliberate construction of this effort—is exemplary of his prowess as a director with a bright future.
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Post by Admin on Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:53 am

http://screencrave.com/2011-03-11/interview-cary-fukunaga/

Interview: Cary Fukunaga for Jane Eyre

This week in theaters Director Cary Fukunaga attempts to surprise us with his romantic, dark and a times even a bit scary take on (Jane Eyreread review). The film stars three of the most subtle and yet magnificent performers working, the much loved shooting star Mia Wasikowska, the always interesting Michael Fassbender and the painfully good and this film, wonderfully funny Judi Dench.

Cary is not in the business of making movies, but making films. He’s a true artist who not only loves his craft but has a number of insightful things to say about it. Find out more in our interview with him below…

How do you take on the challenge of balancing a period piece with a sense of horror?

Cary Fukunaga: It was definitely a cautious challenge. I couldn’t really think of a film and I’d always ask my cinematographer or other people sort of a survey question, “can you name that film?” A period romance film with elements of horror. That was successful, because I feel like Coppola’s DRACULA was one or the other. You know? It was never scary it was never a film he got invested in the romance of the characters. He understood it, but he never got invested. So it as a challenge for me to see if I could do that, I still don’t know how audiences will sort of react to that.

Have you heard peoples reactions to it yet?

CF: The reviews are just starting to come in. I haven’t even watched it with an audience yet. It was sort of found in the writing, found in the shooting, it was also found and finally defined in post. We kind of went back and forth from different versions of horror or not, and I was kind of fighting to keep more horror in, but I do agree that it was taking away from the relationship. So it was a balance, a balance that was sort of not the lowest common denominator but something where you wanna make sure Jane wasn’t lost and the love wasn’t lost. In the end that was the most important.

Making a period piece, were you ever forced into any decisions, be it casting, music, or otherwise?

CF: One of the great things about working with Focus is that you’re never forced, especially with a film with our budget. The pressure is sort of off. It’s like it’s so under the radar in a sense that you can cast whoever you want. Everyone loves Fassbender and Mia was up and coming. That was about the time they were showing The Kids Are All Right so they were excited about her. I’d seen her in HBO’s In Treatment. She looks different in so many different ways, she really is a chameleon in that sense. I think that’s what she wants to do, I think she wants to inhabit different roles, she doesn’t want to become a brand.

cary3 11 11 b Interview: Cary Fukunaga for Jane Eyre

When you’re working with someone like Judi Dench who has so much experience, is she hard to direct?

CF: She still likes direction, everyone likes direction. There are so many subtleties and nuances to performance to make sure everyone’s on the same page. And people like to know they’re doing a good job and pleasing the director. So, Judy’s agent let me know that Judy likes direction so don’t be afraid to help her get to where you want to be.

Though Mia and Michael eat of the scenery, it’s Judi Dench who steals the scenes, often with some well timed humor? How did you get such great reactions out of her while sitting at the breakfast table, listening to the gunshots outside?

CF: We had little ear phone things in their ears, rather than going BANG on set for the shooting I was playing music and changing the music inside their ears. I was playing True Life Crew and Nelly. She was like, “you gotta be kidding…” Instead of faking big boom, giving something that actually disturbs them.

Was it nice to have someone so good at timing adding to the levity of such a dramatic, dark film?

CF: Levity, you need levity to feel anything. You need to laugh before you cry. I think films that take themselves too seriously without any levity are missing an important ingredient to the potential emotional impact of their stories. You need to laugh with someone to like them, often. I think the way Dame Judy portrayed Ms. Fairfax was perfect. Slightly clueless, slightly small minded and obviously not used to being around people. She was great, and I wish we could’ve used more of it.

You didn’t ever test Michael and Mia together, how did you know it would work so well?

CF: Blind faith. It didn’t really occur to me. I just cast the two people I wanted for the role…and, cross your fingers.

And Jamie Bell?

CF: Same thing, I didn’t want to cast the kind of obvious person for that role. I think that Jamie seemed like, or Sally Hawkins, kind of anti-casting for him.

cary3 11 11c Interview: Cary Fukunaga for Jane Eyre

What do you strive for, or hope to get out of your films?

CF: Everyone wants to be liked, so of course you want critical acclaim. After that, box office acclaim isn’t bad. More than anything I think you have to try and make something you’re proud of.. I’m the kind of person where you’re never done, you just keep perfecting and perfecting and perfecting, or trying to fix things that drive you crazy. Often times when you watch a film, “if I could just get through this minute, I’ll be fine.” So I think I’m just hard on myself. There’s not really any sort of sense of, “This is the perfect film, why don’t people like it?” It’s more like, “This is what I’ve done on this film and next film I want to do better on whatever I’m working on at the time.”

Do you ever feel pressure to do something less artistic and more mainstream? Do you ever want to?

CF: They’re always surprised with what I want to do and don’t want to do. I think they’re surprised I don’t want to do robo-tech. I don’t know, it’s like they want me to have a long career. And be prolific and make big movies. I want to be happy while I make movies and not just do things just to work. I want to do things I spend two years on. Because that’s what it means in the end. Or more! Sin Nombre, by the end was nearly 6 years of work. You only have so much time in life so everything you do needs to mean something to you.

With this film were you looking to work with a writing instead of writing the film yourself?

CF: I definitely did it instead of doing my own script, I wanted to get back in the directors chair. There’s a sense of like doing something every year. It’s not like riding a bike, you’re always learning new things, you’re gonna face new challenges and when you face new challenges you’ll have an answer for them. I did a commercial the year before, a short film, then Jane Eyre. So I’ve beens staying busy. I think this year I’ll do another short film, I’ll do some photo shoots…I will stay busy in one way or another.

What kind of pressures do you face moving from one project to the next?

CF: The only pressure is the pressure I put on myself, that’s up to be I guess to mitigate that. I think there’s always pressure that you make the right choice for the next film. You don’t know what the outcome is gonna be, there’s always potential to find length to your career as well. Now I’m so far from any other job skills that if I don’t make movies…

What do you love most about filmmaking?

CF: I mean there’s a lot of favorite parts. I love making the film, working with the actors, showing it when it’s done. It’s something that exists, it’s tangible, it’s immortal. Sometimes you wish that all this energy was spent making movies that meant more as well. You are making art, and art is important but it’d be nice if more of it had an impact on the world. And maybe story-telling does, it’s hard to tell sometimes.

Check out Car Fukunaga’s latest film Jane Eyre in theaters March 11th!
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Post by Admin on Sat Mar 12, 2011 1:33 am

http://www.hollywoodoutbreak.com/2011/03/11/director-cary-fukunaga-brings-out-supernatural-elements-in-jane-eyre/

Mar2011

Cary Fukunaga, who received his share of praise with his feature directing debut with the Spanish language picture Sin Nombre, directs the period drama Jane Eyre, a picture headlined by Alice in Wonderland actress Mia Wasikowska. Fans of the 1943 version (starring Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles) are in for a surprise with this latest effort, claims the filmmaker.

“I wasn’t trying to be different for different’s sake,” said Fukunaga. “For me, from knowing the ‘43 version as a child and reading the novel and then the script, what I really wanted to do was achieve the tone that Charlotte Bronte had naturally written into the story. Quite often in other adaptations, the more suspense, gloomy elements of the story are not necessarily included in the film. The other adaptations are treated the story more as a period romance or a straight love story as she described it. But there are sort of supernatural scenes that are in the book or scenes that are iconic…I wanted to do a movie that had a consistent tone all the way through.”

Click on the media bar and listen to Fukunaga explain why he wanted audience members to “jump out of their seats” with his latest film.

Jane Eyre, co-starring Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds) and Jamie Bell, is now playing.
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Post by Admin on Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:36 am

http://filmreviewonline.com/2011/03/10/jane-eyre-director-cary-joji-fukunaga-on-why-it-should-be-made-every-five-years/

Jane Eyre – Director Cary Joji Fukunaga on why it should be made every 5 years
Posted by Judy Sloane on Mar 10, 2011

Director Cary Fukunaga behind the camera filming © 2011 Focus Features
Cary Joji Fukunaga made his feature film writing and directing debut with Sin Nombre, a thriller filmed on locations throughout Mexico City.

Who would imagine his next movie would be the British classic, Jane Eyre? Based on the popular Charlotte Bronte novel published in 1847, the film tells the story of Jane, a governess who is hired to take care of a little French girl at Thornfield Hall, the home of the gruff and jaded Edward Rochester.

Fukunaga spoke of the challenges of bringing a fresh and new version of Jane Eyre to the screen at the movie’s press day.

How did this project come to you?
Jane Eyre - Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska

Mr Rochester (Michael Fassbender) and Jane Eyre (Mia Wasikowska) © 2011 Focus Features

A few years ago, after writing Sin Nombre but prior to shooting it, I was looking for material to adapt that was in public domain. Jane Eyre was one of the first novels to pop into my head. I’ve always liked exploring the idea of ‘family’ or lack thereof, and particularly remembered the protagonist’s having to overcome so many challenges in her youth to find love and true family.

While I was in the UK for the opening of Sin Nombre, I leaned that a feature version of Jane Eyre was in development. I wanted a chance to read what was being done, so I arranged a meeting.
Were you willing to work with another writer as you wanted to write this project yourself

I was apprehensive at first. What made it viable to me was the Moira Buffini’s adaptation was founded on a structure that had an immediate, contemporary feel, while also remaining faithful to the story. I could see the movie I wanted to make out of it, so it was a compelling and convincing starting point.

At the end of my very first meeting with Alison (Owen, the movie’s producer) and Moira, I said, ‘I’d like to make this movie,’ and, surprisingly, they said, ‘We’d like you to make this movie.’ So it was off to the races.
There have been so many versions of Jane Eyre, did that concern you?
Jane Eyre - Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska

Director Cary Fukunaga on the set © 2011 Focus Features, Photo by Laurie Sparham

I feel like Jane Eyre should be made every five years, so I’m just basically keeping that tradition going. Someone has to do it again 2016. It is definitely a story that I had known about as a kid, I’d grown up with the Robert Stevenson version of the film and I loved the film growing up.
This movie is structured differently than other versions of Jane Eyre, was that something that attracted you to it?

I think that was initially Moira’s idea to start the film with the St John ‘Sinjin’ Rivers (Jamie Bell) part of the story. I thought it was a great way, in terms of contemporary storytelling, to begin with the lowest moment for Jane, and then through flashbacks figure out how she got there. Even in Charlotte Bronte’s novel there’s such a feeling of mystery around the Thornfield part of the story that it just provides an air of consistency to begin the film with a mystery.
What was the biggest challenge in doing the movie?

I knew I was taking on a story that is a period film and a romance with elements of horror. Walking the line among these tones would be difficult, because it’s easier to default to one or the other. I wanted to maintain consistency in the style of telling the story.

The original novel featured many spooky elements, from early Victorian gothic atmospheres to outright spiritual presences; I liked the imagery and was excited by the idea of pushing that side of the story further than in previous adaptations – not full-blown horror, but a definite vibe.
You shot at Haddon Hall in England, what was it about that location that made it right for the story?
Jane Eyre - Director Cary Fukunaga and Cinematographer Adriano Goldman

Director Cary Fukunaga and Cinematographer Adriano Goldman © 2011 Focus Features

There’s something about the craggy rocks, and the kind of bracken that grows there, that makes it darker and more oppressive than the more expansive Yorkshire moors.

We definitely wanted to shoot there, even though it’s more populated; it was challenging, because when we wanted to get an epic shot there would be a radio tower – or an entire village – in view. Although we made it seem like Thornfield is in the middle of nowhere, just beyond the edge of the frame was modern civilization.
What was it like working with Mia and Michael?

Mia didn’t just bring talent; she brought her ideas for the role. She was about doing what was right for it, ready to give her all.

Michael was the first name out of my mouth, I wanted him for Rochester. I thought his interpretation of Bobby Sands in Hunger was amazing and intense.

I’m not a highly emotional person, but there are powerful scenes between Mia and Michae, and I hope this extends to the audience, that nearly brought me to tears. You sense the desperation and the need in both characters.
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Post by Admin on Sat Mar 12, 2011 3:41 am

http://www.tressugar.com/Interview-Cary-Fukunaga-Director-Jane-Eyre-14831100

Video: Hot Jane Eyre Director Cary Fukunaga on the Story's Timeless

by Annie Scudder

Thursday - 3:00PM

Director Cary Fukunaga looked sharp last night at the NYC premiere of Jane Eyre alongside the stars of the film Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender. Earlier this month, the Sin Nombre director stopped by San Francisco, where I chatted with him about his latest movie, a darker take on the Charlotte Brontë novel. Cary says the classic tale has elements that will always be universal, including a woman who will not disrespect herself in the name of love. Find out how he thinks Mia's performance stacks up to past Jane Eyres, why he thinks the movie needs to be made again in 2011, and what historical details you should watch out for when you watch Jane Eyre, out Friday. Watch our interview now!
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Post by Admin on Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:23 pm

http://moviemusereviews.com/exclusive-mia-wasikowska-and-cary-fukunaga-discuss-jane-eyre/

Exclusive: Mia Wasikowska and Cary Fukunaga discuss “Jane Eyre”

* March 12, 2011 6:57 PM
* Steven
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I had the opportunity to attend an advanced screening of the new “Jane Eyre” last weekend, my review of which will come shortly. This remake (for the umpteenth time) of the famous Charlotte Brontë novel comes from the mind of English writer Moira Buffini (“Tamara Drewe”) and director Cary Fukunaga, who made the Central American immigration film “Sin Nombre.”

Fukunaga and star Mia Wasikowska (“Alice in Wonderland,” “The Kids are All Right”) were present to discuss various aspects of the film such as creating a unique vision for an oft-adapted novel, the way ghosts stories played a roll in the film and the challenges of working on authentic accents. “Jane Eyre” officially came out on Friday but will hit more theaters around the country on March 18.
Fukunaga began by addressing what drew him to the project and he points mostly to Moira Buffini’s script:

CF: I think in the last five years I’ve read two good scripts; the other one was “Never Let Me Go.” I hated Mark Romanek for a little while when he got that job … but no, he’s amazing … part of it was already there, but part of it was it was my style of directing — I like to be as naturalistic as possible — I think some of it’s in the visuals but also in the casting: Mia and Michael Fassbender — I wanted to cast people who I felt like their acting style was definitely from the heart and there’s something very truthful in the performances, always giving part of themselves in the performance and that’s part of the realism and the immediacy of something. When you do a period film that takes place 160, 170 years ago the way to make it feel like it’s in front of you happening right now is if you experience it through the honesty of the performances.”
Wasikowska talked about her active interest in playing this role and what makes “Jane Eyre” so timeless:

MW: Well, I was reading the book back in 2009 and I was immediately struck by it and I think I was only on about the fifth chapter when I called my agent and asked “is there a script around? Is anybody developing this project?” There wasn’t anything at the time but it was only about two months later when she emailed me back and sent me the script. Then I met Cary and it kinda went from there. But I think it’s a really timeless story and I think that if you take away the costumes and the period setting, at the core of it is a story that goes through every generation. It’s a young girl trying to find a family and a connection in a really isolated world. That happens today and that’s testament to the fact that the book has continued to grow in popularity. That spoke to me.
An audience member asked Fukunaga if he consciously took the subtext of the book to make this a darker movie:

CF: What makes “Jane Eyre” also timeless, I think, is the kind of love story it is. It’s not just a Jane Austen — not that Jane Austen is “just” — but it’s not simply a romance story; you also have several gothic elements in the storytelling and I think the Brontës, give where they grew up and the amazing imaginations they had in isolation in Northern England plays a part in the stories they tell. And I think that’s inherently part of the novel: the darker, gloomier and even the more suspenseful elements, mortality … the idea for me or at least what intrigued me about it was that there was this darker side of it, I definitely wanted to showcase that in the film.

I think in previous adaptations of the book they chose to make it a pure romance and then the themes, if you will, that take place, the iconic scenes, such as the Red Room when Jane’s young and locked away and thinks she sees a ghost or later on when Bertha is revealed in the attic in Thornfield Hall, those scenes seem to stick out in an awkward way when you just treat the story as pure period drama because they aren’t your typical period drama elements. So to keep that consistent, rather than going into pure horror — we weren’t trying to sex it up by making it a horror film playing off “Twilight” or something like that — it was more just a tone or an atmosphere, and that was a specific choice for consistency. That for me was essential in terms of telling a good story because you want to be consistent, especially within a two-hour time frame you can’t really switch tones that easily and feel like the film is somehow of one.
Another audience member asked they “felt the presence of ghosts tugging at your sleeves,” which was an English teacher’s way of asking whether previous versions of the film had an impact on how they went about this one. However, the two answered more literally:

MW: In terms of the location, the places we were shooting in were so important in terms of getting an understanding of the feel of what it would be like to live in that time. Just being in Northern England you get such a sense of the distance between one estate and another and the real sense of isolation and living in these places that have had so much history. In our Thornfield Hall — we were shooting in Haddon Hall — the floors are all curved in from where a thousand years of human traffic, people walking through there. You really do feel like those places have a life of their own even when you’re not there with a crew of hundreds.

CF: I think everyone loves a ghost story too. Any place you go to the lore or the past of the place plays heavy in contemporary interpretation. I think that goes back to the idea of wanting immortality to some degree. Even Haddon Hall has all kinds of ghost stories. The woman who’s the manager of the place won’t go in some parts of the house by herself. Touring, I toured 40 or 50 houses looking for the right location for the film, and every location you go to has ghost stories. I myself have stayed in hotels and been haunted by poltergeists … those are longer stories for another time.
Wasikowska is asked about working with Michael Fassbender and the importance of chemistry in this situation:

MW: Me and Michael hadn’t read together before we turned up for the first day of rehearsals and I feel like there was possibly a sigh of relief on everyone’s part because we got along so well from the beginning. I think when you have to have such an intense relationship as characters in the film, half your job is done when you get along really well. We were able to take the intensity of the material and counter that with a lot of fun in between scenes and I think that’s so vital to be able to have fun and channel that into the intensity of the work. I had so much fun with him.
Wasikowska was then asked about her newfound love of photography, especially while on set:

MW: I’ve been taking pictures the last three or four films I’ve done and I love it. Our perspective as actors is so interesting. I keep a little camera in my pocket. It’s the moments just before we roll that are so interesting where they’re lining up a shot on you and there’s the camera in your face and a boom (mic), and everyone’s kind of staring at you but not really. Not published at the moment but maybe one day eventually.
Fukunaga on the connection between this film and “Sin Nombre” and his thoughts on future projects:

CF: There are definite thematic links. I love family and bonding and the different kinds of love and how that manifests itself in terms of family atmosphere and re-creations of family. But really, because it takes so long to make a movie, I’m already at almost two years on this one, you want to have as much of a diverse experience as possible because you have only a finite period in life to make films and you want to make them all different, at least I want to make them all different, so I want to try something else out next, a new location. I was getting offered a lot of drug cartel scripts and stuff after “Sin Nombre.” As much as I was involved in drug cartels as a youth, I feel like I really wanted to reach into this other part of myself.
A British gentleman “from Wisconsin” highlighted the use of regional accents in the film, which was a very conscious decision:

CF: In this particular case, I knew for most audiences beyond the UK that accents wouldn’t necessarily read but it was important for me in terms of the authenticity that you did get a sense of Jane’s accent. We definitely talked a lot about what region it would be and how broad it would be, broad being a more pronounced accent and therefore lower class or how refined it would be in terms of RP which is received pronunciation, which is the Queen’s English. For Rochester, being an Irishman, Fassbender came in very late with the accent part so he worked very hard for two weeks to get a very complicated mix of RP and regional at the same time which is not an easy thing to pull off actually when you’re in the midst of doing scenes. It’s a very difficult balance to pull off for any actor and it’s a very subtle thing that obviously only UK people will appreciate.

MW: We really liked the idea of Jane not being quite as refined and not being quite as polished. Her accent giving some echo to her past being not as polished and proper as others. We also justified that by saying she’d mainly be raised probably by Bessie, her nurse, who had a very strong Northern accent and then it would’ve been weened out of her during her time at Lowood and refined and polished a little bit more but still having a hint of an edge.
Finally, the addressed “the best part” of having their jobs:

MW: I feel really privileged to be able to do what I do. We get to travel a lot and see lots of places and I love learning history through stories so basically when I find a story I get to delve into the history of that time and those characters and those people and really immerse myself in that, so I get to do something I really love.

CF: You could answer the politically correct “it’s so great to be a director, a lot of people want to do this job,” but also, I had a conversation with someone earlier today about immortality and that goes on two levels on making films: one, make a film and it lasts forever. To me, Mia will always be a 19-20 year-old girl in this film even when she’s old and with a walker and that’s an amazing thing, all these people come together to make this thing. Successful or not, there’s a lot of human resources: energy and time and thought that go into it and to give themselves and they’ve sacrificed relationships and all kinds of things that happen making a movie. So that’s one part that’s sort of magical you get to be the helmer on that moment in time for those people and it is a moment in time because you’re together for three months and most of those people will never come together again.

There’s that side of it and there’s also a side of the thing with immortality about never going old, sort of a Peter Pan thing. The question is is the moment when you become an adult the moment you stop believing in fantasy? The moment you start believing that life has a certain amount of reality and you have to do these things and there’s an end at some point, or do you always believe in the impossible? And that’s sort of the child’s view of the world: there are no limits. I think when you work on a film the most exciting thing about it is there aren’t any limits really.

Once again, “Jane Eyre” will be released on a wider scale from Focus Features beginning Mar. 18.
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Post by Admin on Mon Mar 14, 2011 3:59 am

http://drupal.sfexaminer.com/entertainment/movies/2011/03/cary-fukunaga-and-making-jane-eyre

Cary Fukunaga and the making of 'Jane Eyre'

By: Rossiter Drake 03/13/11 10:00 PM
Special to The Examiner
Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre director Cary Fukunaga
Star turn: Mia Wasikowska passed on auditioning for “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” so she could play the title character in the new film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s classic book. (Courtesy photo)

It’s been a long time since Cary Fukunaga earned his first break in the movie business at a now-defunct filmmakers’ co-op just south of Market.

But sitting in a posh suite at the St. Regis Hotel in San Francisco, promoting his captivating new adaptation of “Jane Eyre” which opens Friday, the Oakland-born director seems inclined to reminisce.

“It was sort of like the Bay Area’s independent film bureau,” says Fukunaga, 33. “You went there if you wanted to get low-end indie-movie production jobs. I found a flier for some really low-budget horror film looking for a location scout, and I got the job, working for free.

“The director called me in one day and told me I was the only one doing any work. I’d been taking pictures around San Francisco, that was the extent of my effort to that point. So we went to City Hall, got permits, and he made me
location manager.”

These days, Fukunaga is calling the shots, thanks in large part to the success of his 2009 feature debut, “Sin Nombre,” a tense drama, entirely in Spanish, about a Honduran teenager trying to realize her dream of relocating to the U.S who meets up with a Mexican gang member trying to escape his violent past.

How did he decide to follow up his foreign-language debut with a fresh take on Charlotte Brontë’s celebrated early-Victorian novel about an orphaned governess?

“My manager told me that your second movie is the most important,” he says. “When you do a classic, you can’t be blamed for bad writing — that’s on the author. And after six years in the ghettos of Latin America, I was happy to do something completely different. The idea of living in England for a few months was very attractive.”

Fukunaga admits he drew more inspiration from Robert Stevenson’s 1943 adaptation starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine than from Brontë’s novel.

But he describes Jane’s story, of a strong, independent-minded woman living in an age of repression, as timeless. And Mia Wasikowska, whom two-time Oscar nominee Gus Van Sant recommended for the role, agrees.

“It’s not obvious where Jane’s strength comes from,” says Wasikowska, 21, the “Alice in Wonderland” star who passed on a chance to read for another resilient heroine, in David Fincher’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” so she could play the lead in “Jane.”

“She doesn’t come from a loving upbringing, and she doesn’t have much guidance. Everything she’s achieved is because of what she’s made of herself. She believes she’s worthy of having a good life and being treated well. Cary and I thought that was a good message for any girl, today or back then.”

IF YOU GO
Jane Eyre

Starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell
Written by Moira Buffini
Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga
Rated PG-13
Running time 2 hours
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Post by Admin on Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:02 am

http://www.landmarktheatres.com/letters/janeeyre.htm

Jane Eyre

by director Cary Joji Fukunaga

When I last wrote to you (two years ago this month), my first feature Sin Nombre was about to open. I’d like to thank you for your support; I learned that some of our best runs were in Landmark theatres and it’s wonderful to think that many of you who read my last letter went out to see the film.

In the interim I’ve made another movie. It’s called Jane Eyre. Some of you may have been forced to read the book while growing up; I hope you will not hold that against me. While it is very much the traditional story of Charlotte Brontë’s unforgettable novel (we haven’t updated the action to the present, or sent Jane Eyre to hunt vampires), it’s also a new version—and hopefully more compelling than previous adaptations—of this classic story.

I am lucky to have cast two incredible leads, Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender, with an all-star supporting cast that includes Dame Judi Dench, Jamie Bell, Sally Hawkins, and Simon McBurney, amongst many others. If you’ve seen Mia in In Treatment, then you’ve seen a bit of the intelligence, fire, and poise she brings to a role like Jane Eyre. And if you’ve seen Michael in Hunger, then you’ve seen how thoroughly his striking intelligence, focus, and fierce charisma could embody an Edward Fairfax Rochester. The fact that we could make this movie with such talent is fortunate alchemy indeed.

The centerpiece of the film is the intellectual tête-à-tête between Rochester and Jane. Mia and Michael’s performances resonate with passion; the full impact and poetry of Brontë, the specificity of her words, becomes theirs. Simply said, they embodied those characters.

I feel both men and women will be able to relate to this particular adaptation, not only in the darker, more gothic interpretation of the text (which I believe is more faithful to Brontë’s intentions), but also in the universality of each character’s desires. Jane and Rochester are on journeys both physical and emotional; similar to Sin Nombre, each of them is yearning to find their place in the world, to know each other, and in the process discovering the dangers as well as the delights of love.

I hope that our Jane Eyre becomes a new favorite version for many, including yourselves.
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Post by Admin on Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:39 am

http://firstrendnews.co.cc/marshall-fine-huffpost-interview-director-cary-fukunaga-of-jane-eyre.html

Marshall Fine: HuffPost Interview: Director Cary Fukunaga of Jane Eyre
On Monday, March 14th, 2011

It seems like a long way from the slums of Mexico City to the moors of 19th-century England but, for director Cary Fukunaga, it’s not that great a stretch.

When asked how hard it was to jump from his first film, Sin Nombre, to his second, a new adaptation of Jane Eyre, Fukunaga, 33, says, “It’s kind of the same story. They’re both about girls who are overcoming adversity while looking for love.”

In fact, Fukunaga decided to make a film from Charlotte Bronte’s classic novel because it also took him so far away from the world of 2009′s Sin Nombre. Not that everyone else didn’t want to keep him there.

“I didn’t want to do a gang movie or a cartel movie or a border movie,” the filmmaker says in a telephone interview. “I didn’t want to touch that. But that’s what I was being sent. For me, the main reason I did Jane Eyre was to be as different as possible.”

After Sin Nombre, which had its premiere at Sundance, Fukunaga was working on other projects that weren’t quite coming together when Jane Eyre dropped in his lap: “It just fit into the schedule and the cast I wanted was available,” he says. “It was really special.”

Jane Eyre, which opened in limited release last week, took the California-born Fukunaga from a story about Mexican gangs and put him on the British heath in the 19th century. Fukunaga was interested in the period and the place because “it was a great period of change. You’re getting to the modern era – it was the dawn of the modern era.”

The modernity of the present time, however, proved challenging. Even in the most remote British locations, Fukunaga found that he couldn’t escape signs and symbols of the real world in recreating the period of his story.

“In Derbyshire, there was a big coal-burning electric plant that we had to erase digitally from some shots – along with cell towers and airplanes all over the place,” he says. “Even the parts of Yorkshire and the moors that were more expansive had things we had to erase in post-production. Those were our special effects.”

The other challenges of shooting a period film were more concrete: “The wardrobe was tough,” he says. “Just to change a costume took an hour and a half. When you’re on a tight schedule, that makes it extremely difficult to balance the time demands.”

There was also the matter of a difference in the cast. In Sin Nombre, he was working with nonactors; in Jane Eyre, he had Dame Judy Dench, along with such well-trained performers as Michael Fassbender, Sally Hawkins and Mia Wasikowska.

“So that was a different kind of directing challenge – a big shift in my approach as a director,” he says.

One aspect he did enjoy: using horses in his film.

“I wish more people used horses for transportation,” he says, adding with a chuckle, “I’m looking for a film that I can direct from horseback. That would be a little galling for the crew, probably. Carrying a sword might be too much. Maybe just a riding crop.”

At this point, Fukunaga has three or four other scripts in various stages of development, including a musical and a science-fiction story.

“I’ll get to them as soon as I feel rested,” he says. “I feel like my head has been in the 19th century for the last year and a half.”
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Post by Admin on Tue Mar 15, 2011 2:09 am

http://www.sfexaminer.com/entertainment/movies/2011/03/cary-fukunaga-and-making-jane-eyre

Cary Fukunaga and the making of 'Jane Eyre'

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By: Rossiter Drake 03/13/11 10:00 PM

Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre director Cary Fukunaga
Star turn: Mia Wasikowska passed on auditioning for “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” so she could play the title character in the new film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s classic book. (Courtesy photo)

It’s been a long time since Cary Fukunaga earned his first break in the movie business at a now-defunct filmmakers’ co-op just south of Market.

But sitting in a posh suite at the St. Regis Hotel in San Francisco, promoting his captivating new adaptation of “Jane Eyre” which opens Friday, the Oakland-born director seems inclined to reminisce.

“It was sort of like the Bay Area’s independent film bureau,” says Fukunaga, 33. “You went there if you wanted to get low-end indie-movie production jobs. I found a flier for some really low-budget horror film looking for a location scout, and I got the job, working for free.

“The director called me in one day and told me I was the only one doing any work. I’d been taking pictures around San Francisco, that was the extent of my effort to that point. So we went to City Hall, got permits, and he made me
location manager.”

These days, Fukunaga is calling the shots, thanks in large part to the success of his 2009 feature debut, “Sin Nombre,” a tense drama, entirely in Spanish, about a Honduran teenager trying to realize her dream of relocating to the U.S who meets up with a Mexican gang member trying to escape his violent past.

How did he decide to follow up his foreign-language debut with a fresh take on Charlotte Brontë’s celebrated early-Victorian novel about an orphaned governess?

“My manager told me that your second movie is the most important,” he says. “When you do a classic, you can’t be blamed for bad writing — that’s on the author. And after six years in the ghettos of Latin America, I was happy to do something completely different. The idea of living in England for a few months was very attractive.”

Fukunaga admits he drew more inspiration from Robert Stevenson’s 1943 adaptation starring Orson Welles and Joan Fontaine than from Brontë’s novel.

But he describes Jane’s story, of a strong, independent-minded woman living in an age of repression, as timeless. And Mia Wasikowska, whom two-time Oscar nominee Gus Van Sant recommended for the role, agrees.

“It’s not obvious where Jane’s strength comes from,” says Wasikowska, 21, the “Alice in Wonderland” star who passed on a chance to read for another resilient heroine, in David Fincher’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” so she could play the lead in “Jane.”

“She doesn’t come from a loving upbringing, and she doesn’t have much guidance. Everything she’s achieved is because of what she’s made of herself. She believes she’s worthy of having a good life and being treated well. Cary and I thought that was a good message for any girl, today or back then.”

IF YOU GO
Jane Eyre

Starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell
Written by Moira Buffini
Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga
Rated PG-13
Running time 2 hours
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 18, 2011 5:06 pm

http://www.8asians.com/2011/03/18/director-cary-fukunaga-talks-about-jane-eyre/

Director Cary Fukunaga Talks About “Jane Eyre”

By Dino-Ray | Friday, March 18, 2011

Cary Joji Fukunaga may not be the first name that pops into your mind when you think about Brit-lit movie adaptations like Jane Eyre — but for a director who directed Sundance bait and cinematic high-brow fare like Sin Nombre you might reconsider the assumptions. The Oakland-born Fukunaga has quite a diverse scope when it comes to making movies.

With Jane Eyre, he was very familiar with the 1944 version of the film directed by Robert Stevenson and starring Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles. In fact, it’s one of his favorites. His iteration stars Mia Wasikowska (The Kids Are All Right, Alice in Wonderland) as the title character and Michael Fassbender (Inglorious Basterds) as the leading man, Rochester. After spending six years on Sin Nombre, he says he wanted to do something different in terms of scenery, style, location and time period. Even so, he doesn’t see an incredible difference between the two films in term of characters. Plus, it was an opportunity for him to do something that he enjoys: travel.

“It was a moment for me to live in Europe for a while,” he jokes, “changing the jungles of South America to the moors of Northern England.”

I had the opportunity to chat with Fukunaga more about his worldly travels, capturing the essence of Jane Eyre for modern audiences and finding his inner-adolescent girl .

We know that you are a fan of the 1944 movie, but when did you read the book?

After I got the job. (laughs)

What are some of the specific elements that drew you into the story?

I never really analyzed too much why I like movies because it kind of ruins the magic of it. you can find different, intellectual thematic reasons that sort of line up with all the movies you like. (Jane Eyre) is more about this kid’s journey and the person she became. Then there’s elements of secrecy and mystery. They play on ideas of what it’s like to be true to yourself. Love can be all consuming and too often people compromise what they are in order to achieve it. It’s the rare individual who doesn’t do that.

How long did it take you to shoot the movie?

44 days — it seems like it was bigger. We were jamming the whole time — as fast as you can go in a period film.

When creating a period piece, how detailed and accurate do you aim to be with the scenery, language, costume, set design and everything else?

As accurate as possible — especially with the language. Accurate to the point where it is still comprehensible by modern audiences. In terms of all the details — as real as possible. The costume designer, Michael O’Connor, sourced real materials like textiles and used original lace, collars, suspenders — down to the details on the boots. Everything was highly detailed.

Did you think about re-interpreting it for modern audiences? Better yet, why should the High School Musical audience watch it?

One of the best things about Jane — Rochester says it when they first meet — the way she thinks is not like everyone else. She has original thoughts. She doesn’t follow what everyone else thinks is right. The moral code she lives by is something she discovered for herself and she sticks by it. That’s a lesson for young girls or…old people (laughs)

Do you consciously pick projects that are diverse or do you go with what feels right at the time?

I feel like the genres are diverse, but my themes are always linked to family — and that’s very broad. Everyone’s family is dramatic. Sometimes more dramatic than others. In my last two films, I’ve been looking for the inner-adolescent girl in me (laughs). I think I might move on to a different element of the family story. In some way, love, companionship and family are strong themes that I am interested in — but I think there are a lot people interested in that.

Do your projects that you are working on have an influence on your life and vice versa?

It’s a weird thing when directing a film. It’s almost like taking on an accent. When you’re doing film, there’s a sense about being in that world all the time — even when you’re not on set anymore because you’re thinking about the next day. All your relationships are based on that story at that time. It’s like any story — it becomes like a moral tale. How do I describe this shortly? You know when you go to church or temple or whatever you go to and the sermon for the day has some sort of theme and you can reference that later on in terms of how to live life? The literature you read also has that effect — what your moral compass is in life. The decisions that this heroes and heroines have made has an effect on what you do in your own life.

It seems that you like to travel a lot for your films. Where do you want to go next?

I have this film I wrote in Africa, but I am not sure if I want to spend a year in Africa right now. Eastern Europe would be fun. Belize would be fun — but for now, I kind of want to just chill out.

What about America?

My reps keep on saying, “You gotta make a movie in America one day — you are American — don’t forget that.”

Jane Eyre is now playing in select theaters.
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Post by Admin on Fri Mar 25, 2011 9:47 pm

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ent/7491637.html

Fukunaga pins his future on love of past
Jane Eyre director took on remake of beloved classic full throttle
By SARA BRICKMAN FILM WRITER
March 25, 2011, 5:11PM

Cary Joji Fukunaga, the 33-year-old director of this year's adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre — the book's 28th adaptation to date - isn't the first person you'd peg as an avid Civil War re-enactor.

Half Japanese, half Swedish, Fukunaga was born in Oakland, Calif., attended the University of California-Santa Cruz and, until recently, snowboarded actively. He looks to be neither apple-pie-fed nor dorky enough to have spent his free time as a teenager buying brogans and falling for a re-enactor's daughter who looked particularly fine by the lemonade bowl in her crinoline dress.

But when Fukunaga is passionate about something, he goes full throttle.

"I love living history, and I once participated in a re-enactment with 10,000 people," he said. He was sporting his Civil War boots, genuinely worn-in by days camping and on the field but matching his tousled-director look perfectly.
Nothing modern

"You look to your right, you look to your left, and there's nothing modern at all," he said, grinning. "It's amazing."

A fitting comment — and hobby — for a young filmmaker who has a keen ability to visualize cinematic scenes and conducts total-immersion research for his films. The combination has catapulted him, in just five years, from an unknown New York University film student to Focus Features' new wunderkind, in the tradition of Ang Lee and Joe Wright.

Fukunaga became interested in the Civil War when he was 12. Grounded in his room, he overheard David McCullough narrating the Ken Burns Civil War series, which his family was watching in the living room. When his school's janitor handed him a pamphlet about a re-enactors' meeting in Napa, he went and became a re-enactor for five years.
Suspension of disbelief

"There is this suspension of disbelief at re-enactments, just like you get watching a film," he said.

It's Fukunaga's ability to elicit this suspension of disbelief in audiences that caught the eye of Focus Features in 2005 with Victoria Para Chino, his NYU student short that explored the fate of illegal immigrants who suffocated in the back of a truck while being smuggled into the U.S. in 2003. Fukunaga won the 2005 Student Academy Award at the Sundance Film Festival and was asked to submit a script to Sundance Labs, a workshop in which filmmakers work to develop a screenplay with industry mentors.

The result was his feature-film debut, Sin Nombre, again about immigrants crossing the border. True to form, he researched not by surfing the Internet from his New York apartment but by riding the trains in Central America, interviewing gang members and witnessing, firsthand, the harrowing journey his characters would be making. He wrote and directed the film, which won 10 international awards.

Focus Features distributed it and then tapped Fukunaga for Jane Eyre, starring Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, The Kids Are All Right) and Michael Fassbender (Hunger, Inglourious Basterds).
Reservations

James Schamus, CEO of Focus, shrugs off any reservations about Fukunaga's youth, though, admittedly, it is gutsy to give the relatively inexperienced director a classic already adapted by the likes of Orson Welles and Franco Zeffirelli.

"It's very easy to think of it as something that should only be touched by someone of sage wisdom," Schamus says. "But Cary has such a mature directorial personality."

Schamus was struck by how skillfully Fukunaga adapted a novel that predates cinematic narrative convention and calls him a "great actor's director."

Fukunaga started directing as a teenager on short films — "I had my first on-set tantrum at 14 because people weren't paying attention to my horror film" — and gained experience after college as a grip and camera assistant and then as an NYU film student.

For his latest project, in lieu of immersive time-travel, presumably the hands-on director's preferred mode of research, Fukunaga lived with Jane Eyre - which he hadn't read before he got the job - marking it up with highlighters, pens and Post-its and working with screenwriter Moira Buffini to strike the right balance between the novel's gothic and romantic strains.

In an innovative twist, this version begins Jane's story at the end of the book, with Jane looking back on her life, and lacks the often overblown elements of other adaptations, like a puffed-up Welles bellowing "Jane!" over the moors.

Though he may indeed be an actor's director, he is a trained cinematographer and worked closely with his director of photography, Adriano Goldman, to praised results. At a recent Q&A, an audience member raised her hand not to ask a question but to compliment Fukunaga, saying scenes popped like Vermeer and Caravaggio. Fukunaga grinned sheepishly.

In one of the film's scenes, Jane Eyre expresses displeasure with her sketches, lamenting, "I imagine things I'm powerless to execute."

So far, for the young director, that seems not to be a problem.

Jane Eyre is now playing at the River Oaks Theatre.
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Post by Admin on Fri Apr 22, 2011 8:39 pm

http://rocknrollghost.com/2011/04/17/film-interview-mia-wasikowska-cary-fukunaga-jane-eyre-focus-features

Film Interview: Mia Wasikowska & Cary Fukunaga – Jane Eyre – Focus Features
By
admin
– April 17, 2011

by Lucas Pops

Mia Wasikowska jumped into the mainstream with her breakout role in Tim Burton’s box office tour de force Alice in Wonderland. Her latest film, Jane Eyre, is the latest adaptation of Charlotte Bronte‘s classic novel. Directing the project is up and coming great, Cory Fukunaga, the man behind the sensational independent film Sin Nombre.

Rock ‘n Roll Ghost’s Lucas Pops: What struck you, Mia, about the novel Jane Eyre that you wanted to communicate during filming?

Mia Wasikowska: She’s a really original character. She has a strong sense of self and who she is. She doesn’t compromise herself or who she is. And there’s something inside her that believes she’s worthy of having a good life. And I think that’s really admirable.

I really enjoyed your chemistry with Michael Fassbender. It was impossible to look away from it. How was it on the set with him?

Mia Wasikowska: It was great. We had a lot of fun and we were able to counter the intensity of the material with a lot of fun and playing around. And then we were able to channel that intensity back into the scene. And I think because I had so much respect for him it made it so easy to act opposite someone whose presence has such intensity to it.

Cory, Jane Eyre is very different from your previous film. How did you approach filming Jane Eyre as opposed to Sin Nombre?

Cory Fukunaga: The same really. You have a story, you know an idea and what it looks like in your head and you just set out to do that. All the elements of filmmaking are exactly the same. In fact, I think there are a lot of thematic elements between the character of Sayra in Sin Nombre and Jane in terms of people who have had difficult pasts, but they’re able to go for what they desire out of life which is that companionship. Obviously it’s a very different shoot from sitting on top of a train to corsets and horses and stuff like that.

And I just wanted to know how you came across Jane Eyre. As in how you got involved with the project.

Cory Fukunaga: To get the film, the Bob Stevens’ version of the book, was definitely a challenge. I had thought about adapting it myself when I was waiting for Sin Nombre to go into production. When I was in the U.K. doing promotions for Sin Nombre I found out that BBC had a Jane Eyre project in theatrical slate. So I asked to read it and I liked what the screenwriter had done with it. So I met with the producer and the writer. I told them I liked their project. They told me they liked me.

Mia you have now played two iconic literary figures. What is alive in Alice and Jane that you think keeps people constantly interpreting them for new audiences?

Mia Wasikowska: Well, I think it’s a combination of many things. I think it’s important for stories to be retold. And I personally enjoy seeing things being interpreted by other people and seeing the paths that people choose to include and what they do. I think that says a lot about our times and each reinterpretation is like a time capsule.

Cary can I ask you what situations in your personal life prepared you to write Sin Nombre? What aspect of your character relate to the characters in the film?

Cory Fukunaga: (sarcastically) Aside from my gangster past? You know I don’t know. I grew up in Oakland. I wouldn’t say I grew up in the ghetto, but I’m not unfamiliar with the ghetto. I grew up around gangs. I’m very “Go wherever the story takes me”. So when I made the short film and I had the opportunity to make it into a feature film I went and did research. And while traveling with that film I ended up in the U.K. where I heard about Jane Eyre and ended up doing Jane Eyre. I don’t really have a strategy, maybe I should; other than just “Oh that sounds interesting”. And also to know that you’re basically giving two years of your life to something. So whatever is the common link between them will probably be determined over the course of more films. But for me it’s just “Don’t say no to good things”.
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Post by Admin on Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:56 pm

http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/movies/movie-news/Cary+Fukunaga-97729.html

Cary Fukunaga Reveals Why He Cast Wasikowska

12 August 2011

Currently 4/5 Stars.

Cary Fukunaga has revealed why he cast Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre.

The filmmaker is bringing a new take on the Charlotte Bronte novel which sees the young actress star alongside Michael Fassbender and Jamie Bell.

And the actor admits that there are a couple of reasons as to why he cast her in one of literature's most famous roles.

Speaking to Empire magazine the filmmaker said: "I cast Mia as Jane Eyre for two reasons. One was her age. Jane is 18 years old, fresh out of a charity school and forced into a very adult role, and a very adult relationship with a man 20 years her senior.

"And secondly, it was her fire. There’s a tremendous intensity in her performances, and a maturity beyond her years."

Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins and Imogen Poots are also all on the cast list for the movie while the screenplay was penned by Moira Buffini, who penned the script for Tamara Drewe.

This is the first movie for director Fukunaga since Sin Nombre back in 2009.

Jane Eyre is released 9th September.
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