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Discuss Centurion

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Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 13, 2010 7:37 am

Just making a place to talk about the movie, so it doesn't get lost in reviews.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:39 pm

I'm watching, well the tv is on "Casino Royale" and is it just me or is Olga prettier in Centurion than in this film?
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Sun Feb 21, 2010 11:02 pm

@Lucindajelley went to cast and crew viewing of Centurion today, awesome film!! well done us! xx about 4 hours ago

@andyjshep @NoelClarke enjoyed Centurion today, congrats on another one in the can! about 10 hours ago

@CYCLINGTAZ @NoelClarke dont think i can wait 2 months till centurion comes out about 11 hours ago

@W0NK042 RT @NoelClarke: Just watched CENTURION. It was absolutley f*cking Awesome.. British Movies at their best. Go watch it when it comes out. about 13 hours ago

@NoelClarke CENTURION: for those who don't know. And yes i'm in it. http://tinyurl.com/ydv69ch http://twitpic.com/12u5qc http://twitpic.com/13tetr RT about 13 hours ago
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:04 am

http://bulletproofcourier.blogspot.com/2010/08/movie-parallels-inglorious-basterds-and.html

Monday, August 16, 2010
Movie Parallels: Inglorious Basterds and Centurion

A year after his starring role in Inglorious Basterds, actor Michael Fassbender followed up with Centurion, a movie with striking similarities to Inglorious Basterds.

In both movies, Fassbender showcases his zesty talent for different languages and accents.


Michael Fassbender in Inglorious Basterds: "drei Gläser!" (oops!)


Michael Fassbender in Centurion: "Ky-eer me-yeejet!"

In both movies, characters hide silently under the floorboards:


Shosanna (Mélanie Laurent) hides silently under the floorboards


Quintus Dias (Fassbender) hides silently under the floorboards

In both movies, a uniquely gifted tracker hunts down human prey:


Christoph Waltz plays the gifted Jew Hunter


Olga Kurylenko plays the gifted Roman Hunter

Interesting and funny! I think the Centurion script writers were just having a little meta fun with Fassbender's previous role. And for that, we thank them.

Posted by bulletproofcourier at 7:26 PM
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 18, 2010 6:09 pm

http://www.aloo-gobi.com/?p=58729

Categorized | Hollywood
Centurion 101
Posted on 18 August 2010

Centurion

Most of what I know about the Roman Empire I learned from a handful of historical epics and the collected adventures of Asterix. Inspired though by the impending release of Descent director Neil Marshall’s Centurion, an authentically bloody actioner starring Michael Fassbender as a Roman soldier hunted by savage locals in early AD Britain, I decided to learn more. Invited by the fine folk at Roman Tours to spend a day in the sandals of a Roman soldier, wary though I was of the physical repercussions, I jumped at the chance.

Heading for the leafy glades of North London’s Kenwood, a family-friendly patch of Hampstead Heath, I prayed my enthusiasm for the day’s adventures would trump my health and fitness failings. From a distance I head a gruff voice bark something in Latin, and soon after witnessed the spectacle of five Roman soldiers marching towards me in close formation, dressed to the nines in ancient finery, their helmets gleaming in the sun, holstered weapons clanking against worn but shiny armour.

Experiencing a sudden rush of trepidation, I hid my fears behind a mask of bravado that I’m convinced encouraged the lads to push me harder than they’d initially planned. “That armour doesn’t look so heavy,” I heard myself saying, adding something about eating eight-mile hikes for breakfast, and topping it off with a groundless boast about my sword skills, neglecting to explain these abilities are more videogame than reality-based.

First things first: costume time. Though it wasn’t exactly scorching the day was muggy as hell, and considering how much insulation I’m already packing on my hefty form, it was no great pleasure pulling on the first layer, the tunica, essentially a thick woolly dress. After that came the sub-armourlis, a substantial leather waistcoat designed to protect the wool from wear, and insulate the professional fighting man from armour that in the winter would be cold as Santa’s beard, and in the summer, hot as Satan’s underpants.

Then came the weight, the chain mail hamarta, a 15kg top I was told would protect me from various light projectiles, if not from the lifetime of backache it had already begun to inflict. Beyond those high-fashion items, I sported such accessories as a hefty gladius sword for stabbing and hacking, a blistering pair of caligae sandals that apparently are really hot with the ladies right now, and a bronze helmet substantial enough to accommodate my watermelon head and Eric Morecambe specs. Though I couldn’t recall seeing anyone in Centurion wearing glasses, I was, I must admit, less concerned with historical accuracy than with the need to see beyond the tip of my nose.

With sweat filling my eyes, chain mail squeezing my pits and an enormous wooden shield spanking my biceps, I was given my marching orders. Shame they were in Latin, otherwise I might have understood what I was supposed to do. Still, I tried my best, parading about before bemused Kenwood day-trippers at a pace akin to the Dad’s Army theme. Falling slightly behind the others, I was treated to a burst of English from boss of the outfit Paul Harston, a.k.a. Centurio Ocratius Maximis, or Gittus to his friends. “Come on Julius,” he yelled, doing his best Windsor Davies, “it’s easier to keep up than catch up!”

A brief pause, soon after, to take on some serious weight: an authentically leaden field kit loaded with clothes, supplies, an oil lamp and model of my favourite god. Together with my armour, shield and newfound spear, I was carrying an extra 50kg, much like I did after my last all-inclusive holiday. Plus now I was marching uphill, cursing like a soldier, just not in Latin. I wondered if Michael Fassbender and his movie star chums suffered like this during the production of Centurion? Those brave souls…

Fielding looks from the others as diverse as amusement, disdain and pity, my energy escaping me I attempted an hour of weapons training, chucking a spear for all my life was worth, ramming my shield against hostile invaders and receiving several bell-ringing bashes to my helmet, including one time when I nearly knocked myself unconscious with my own spear.

Toughest of all was a final confrontation with bearded wonder David Flockton, a.k.a. Marcus Aurellius Nepos, a likeable bloke by all accounts, but drop-dead terrifying with his fighting face on. Bolstered, however, by the words of Galaxy Quest’s Commander Peter Quincy Taggart, to never give up and never surrender, I battled through my knocks and against expectations, bashed Nepos on the knuckles. He seemed impressed, too, if not by my technique then by my fighting spirit, although to be honest, at that stage I was so utterly done in, the entire incident may have been a hallucination.

Regardless, I came away from the day with so much more than mild dehydration, peppered bruising and a limp. I’d learned that beyond their incredible physical toughness, the ancient squaddie, much like his modern counterpart, was disciplined, loyal, skilled and indomitable. No wonder the Roman Empire lasted so long.

Buy or rent Centurion now, on Blu-ray and DVD, in store or online from blockbuster.co.uk.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Thu Aug 19, 2010 8:00 pm

I just finished watching Centurion for the first time.

First points that come to mind

-great cinematography
-enjoyed the soundtrack
-good acting

I don't know how much most of you read the reviews, but a lot of them tell parts of the story. By reading most of them you probably get the gist of the film.

I had heard that Michael does a voiceover/narrative. I thought it would continue throughout most of the film. Michael starts off narrating the film, then there are bits and pieces. When the action and screen dialog starts, you don't hear from him. I remember reading somewhere that after releasing the film, the director felt that he shouldn't have put the narration in. I think it could have gone either way. I particularly like to hear Michael's voice, but the film didn't really have to have it.

After a while, I felt like this could have easily been two films. I love action, but I have yet to learn how to respect gore in film. I know it's more like real life, but still.

When there was finally a lot of dialog, I got really interested in the film. That's when the group meets the outcast, which some reviewers didn't really care for the scene. I thought it was handled well, and gave the few actors some real acting time. Michael does really well within these scenes.

I kind of felt that the dialog throughout the action scenes were a little forced, but then how well can you act when you are freezing your bones off in the snow?

Olga's character was a witch with a B. I felt no sympathy towards her at all. I did enjoy the leader of the Picts and felt more sympathy towards him. But Etain was fiercely ugly, and I guess she meant to be. I'm not sure why reviewers are saying they felt no sympathy towards the romans, but then I think current politics stand in the way of their thought process. Not everything has to be compared to today's environment.

I was really upset by one particular demise involving wolves. Won't say who, but it really bothered me because it was trickery.

I also enjoyed Imogene Poots, who was the outcast. She will also be in Jane Eyre, which I can't wait to see her performance.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Wed Aug 25, 2010 6:59 pm

http://www.zoiksonline.com/2010/08/simon-bisley-helps-brings-centurion-to.html

"Simon Bisley helps brings 'Centurion' to life." - Interview
The movie "Centurion" opens in theaters this Friday, August 27th. It is also available on VOD, Amazon, Xbox Live, Playstation Network and VUDU. The poster art for the film was done by renowned artist Simon Bisley. Bisley recently took time to talk about his work, the poster and the process behind it.

Q - First of all, why did you decide to get into art?

A - I have always been in to art for as long as I can remember. I was drawing as soon as I could grip a pencil.

Q - Who were your early inspirations?

A - My early inspirations go back so far that it's not easy to remember - when I was little I do remember being inspired by animals – especially lions, gorillas and crocodiles. The first image I created when I was 6, St. George and the Dragon, caused quite a stir at school. I was too young to understand the excitement of the teachers and my parents. When I was a teenager it was the stories by R E Howard, Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" and Edgar Rice Burrough's "Tarzan" that really inspired me but eventually I saw Frank Frazetta's work and that was the thing that really set me on fire. I knew that that was the way I wanted to paint.

Q - Your work has a comic book and album cover feel. Was this how you wanted your work to be or did it just evolve into it when you were developing your style?

A - It just evolved as I developed my style. It's all about the over the top emotion and the dramatic with softer more subtle values.

Q - Where did you learn your craft?

A - I am self taught - absorbing things I have seen and experienced in my life. The thing is not just about looking; it is also about living life. You can paint something much better if you've experienced something of what you are illustrating.

Q - When you decide how the art will look visually, what is the process for getting it from idea to canvas?

A - With as little pre-prep as possible because I want to save all the energy for the final painting. For this poster I watched the movie and drew sketches from it. The client would then ask for changes or suggest other ideas and I would redraw or alter until everyone was happy and the drawing approved. Then I would nail it!!

Q - Your latest project is for Neil Marshall's "Centurion." How did this come about?

A - I got a call to ask if I was interested in the project and before he finished the last word I said, 'HELL YEAH!!'

Q - Did you have guidelines for "Centurion" or was it free reign?

A - I had a free reign on this, which I was glad of. The whole process went really smooth and trouble free. I enjoyed working on the painting because I felt they had trust in me to deliver so I respected them for that. If they wanted anything changed or added it was requested in such a way that my enthusiasm was not dampened. Good job, good team effort.

Q - Anything you wanted to add?

A - Thanks for taking an interest in my work. Now go watch the movie, folks.

Simon Bisley is best known for his 1990’s work on ABC Warriors, Lobo and Sláine.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 29, 2010 11:50 pm

http://www.wd-60638.co.cc/know-why-the-manly-roman-centurion-costume-will-be-popular-this-year.html

Know Why the Manly Roman Centurion Costume Will Be Popular This Year
Posted in General - 29 August 2010

The movie Centurion is going to be in theaters in the autumn this year, which will give the Roman Centurion Costumes the possibility of more popularity than is normally the case. The characters of Roman times are both fascinating and well known, and the easily identifiable characteristics of those characters makes it interesting when dressing up.

Although there is more creativity available when dressing up as a Gladiator, and a sheet and laurel wreath portray the immediately recognizable visage of a Roman Senator, the true heroes of the age were the Centurions of Rome’s mighty armed forces. Rome’s Legions built the well known Pax Romana running from Egypt to Britain, and even though the bureaucracy of the Roman Empire kept everything working well, it was still the Legions that provided its primacy.

There are four main elements to making the costume look good. The first is the uniform, which includes the chest piece and knee length tunic. The instantly identifiable helmet with its feathers is important. Since one has to look the part all over, the distinctive Roman sandals are needed. One cannot forget the sword and the shield. For authenticity they should be the Roman short sword, or Gladius, and a Scutum, or small round shield.

The costume can be made distinctive with further improvements like a cape, more weapons, greaves to protect the shins, and arm braces. A spear could also be carried around, but that would probably go too far.

It makes an excellent choice as one part of a couple’s costume also. With the man dressing as the Centurion, the lady has a choice of dressing up as one of the fashionable Roman ladies or as one of the uncontrollable barbarians contesting the Romans. The movie trailer that is available displays these options in an exciting visual fashion.

See the movie trailer and the best complete Roman Centurion Costumes from top online stores all in one place at Centurion Costumes.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Fri Dec 17, 2010 6:46 pm

http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/694636/world_cinema_10_films_you_should_have_seen_this_year_but_probably_didnt.html

World Cinema: 10 films you should have seen this year (but probably didn’t)

N P Horton

In this week’s World Cinema column, Nick lists ten great 2010 films you may have missed...

Published on Dec 16, 2010

It's that time of the year again, the time for lists. And having been taking a look at the more obscure side of cinema for the last few months, I thought it only fitting that my own list should give recognition to those films that haven't had the love of the mainstream, the films that deserve far more reward and respect than those given a place in the local multiplex.

It's not the films no-one heard of. It's just the one's no-one really saw. Luckily for me, I'm not the only one who thinks this way.

Joining me in taking a look through the mainly ignored cinematic gems waiting to be mined by you is Who's Jack magazine film editor, Mark Williams. He's a man dedicated to spending his time alternately watching the back catalogue of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Akira Kurosawa whilst in his pants (Mark, that is. Not Kurosawa), pretty much making him ideal for this site.

I've also asked my fellow DoG writers, a lovely film lecturer, and several others for their opinions and they've all pitched in. Thanks to you all.

Anyway, here there are, in no particular order, ten films you should have seen this year, but probably didn't. And I include myself in that. Some of these will be on my DVD player as soon as I can. Shame on me. Oh, and these are all films which received a 2010 theatrical release in the UK, although I realise a few were released in their own countries the year before.

City Of Life And Death

It won't win prizes for being the cheerful film this year, but it's by far one of the most powerful and affecting films I've watched in a long time. Depicting the 1937 Japanese 'rape of Nanking' in harrowing black and white, the film moves beyond generic horrors of war which we have perhaps become desensitised to, by rooting the story in the characterisation of the initial survivors, especially the women left behind. By creating an intimate portrait of life under occupation, it, in fact, creates a far more epic story of a people destroyed than any conventional action-packed war story.

Seperado!

An adventurous tale with a difference, Seperado! is Super Furry Animal's front man Gruff Rhys' journey to South America in order to track down a lost family member, musician Rene Griffiths. Containing the expected surreal flourishes of the man and his work (the teleporting is a treat), the film also remains a moving exploration of family ancestry and who we are. As Mark puts it, "It's like a good version of Who Do You Think You Are?, but without the posh people finding out they're related to other posh people." Ah, isn't that heart-warming?

The Illusionist

Sylvain Chomet's first full feature film since Belleville Rendezvous, it continues his very unique style of animation and provides both an evocatively rich, and very sweet tale of an old magician and his new assistant, a young girl whom he has taken under his wing. It never develops into some weird love story, but instead is a lovely friendship story. He should maybe increase his output from one film every six years or risk becoming the Terrence Malick of the animated world, but when they're all as gorgeously hand-drawn as this, it seems churlish to complain.

Winter's Bone

Now, this film is bloody excellent and surely deserves some love during awards season (which obviously means it'll be ignored). Having been left seemingly abandoned by her bail dodging father, southerner Ree Dolly (a suitably grubby Jennifer Lawrence) is faced with caring for her younger siblings and almost catatonic mother, whilst also investigating the disappearance of her father. It's hard to describe the power of this film. It's in the stark beauty of the images, the action beats, and the quiet brutality of an unknown rural America.

Breathless

No, not the French New Wave classic. A gritty crime tale from South Korea, this follows an embittered debt collector who befriends a high school girl. (I notice a theme in Mark's choices.) Having lived his whole life as a hard man, the cracks are now beginning to appear. He's essentially a decent man working in an inescapable and unforgiving environment. A brutal and honest portrayal of the never-ending repetitive cycle of violence that poverty and crime draw you into, it's not a slick Tarantino film, but is probably all the more rewarding for it.

Dogtooth

A black family comedy about a Greek family who have kept their children in complete separation from the outside world, this was possibly one of the most bizarre releases of this year. Things start to go wrong for the family when dad brings home a prostitute to satisfy his increasingly sexually mature son, but she instead befriends the girls and disrupts the weird equilibrium. It's unnerving and oddly realistic in equal measure, lending a different meaning to the term family values.

Gainsbourg

A quintessential , ‘I didn't get round to seeing it' film, this is the biopic of the legendary French singer Serge. Charting his life through growing up to success as a songwriter, it seems to be equally cool and enviable, but also hollow and empty. Gainsbourg emerges as an anti-authoritarian folk hero in some respects, and as a snapshot of an artist's life, it inspires and intrigues.

Taqwacore

Witness the birth of a new punk movement. Beginning life as a fictional novel 'The Taqwacores' by Michael Muhammad Knight, it is now a very real Islamic punk movement which has swept America, culminating in the largest gathering in North America by Muslims. Not to pray, but to rock out. While I do not profess to know Islamic culture in any way, this film seems to give Islam a different voice, away from the often scare mongering and negative portrayal depicted in the media. It is also incredibly interesting to see how a new culture adopts and explores punk as an aesthetic and creative movement, vital for youth to both express themselves and assert their independence from the mainstream.

Centurion

Yes, I know it looks a bit out of place on this list. But, bizarrely, it's one film Mark and I were unanimous on. Quite simply, it's a superb British B-movie which will guarantee you a great time while watching it.

After the Ninth Legion is wiped out by Picts, the survivors must fight for their life behind enemy lines. Featuring superb scenery chewing from Dominic 'McNulty' West, and a ripped performance from my current favourite actor, Michael Fassbender, it does tick all the boxes you want from a men on a mission movie. Baddies you can hate, hot women fighting, guys being chased by wolves and an ambush featuring flaming bits of forest hurtling at Roman soldiers. Oh, and it being a Neil Marshall film, lots of blood and guts. It's also the only film this year that made me want to roar, "I am a soldier of Rome, and I will not yield!" Although, to be fair, it would have been weird if I had done it in, say, Inception.
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Re: Discuss Centurion

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 16, 2011 8:36 pm

http://insidepulse.com/2011/02/16/r0btrains-badass-cinema-the-badasses-of-2010-part-1/

R0BTRAIN’s Badass Cinema: The Badasses of 2010, Part 1

by Robert Sutton - February 16, 2011 | Email the author

In regards to 2010’s best of lists and year-end awards, I’ve heard a lot of complaints about the quality of the movies we ended up getting last year as a whole. While I’ll be the first to admit that not all of 2010’s offerings were shining examples of great cinema, and that the past year did fail to produce that sort of transcendent movie like The Dark Knight or Avatar, I’d argue that there was still plenty of greatness to go around, especially considering films such as Inception and The Social Network not only hit theater screens but were widely celebrated and appreciated. Even further, when it came to producing action cinema and bad-ass characters, 2010 was overflowing in this department, making it hard to just keep my annual list to just 25 characters.

Several years in the past I found it a little difficult to come up with 25 viable candidates, even scraping the bottom of the barrel at times, but in 2010, there were so many cinematic badasses produced that I had to turn away several amazing ass-kickers (Noomi Rapace The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and John Hawkes from Winter’s Bone, for example), and even had to come up with a rule (with one exception) that prevented multiple characters from coming from the same movie. Otherwise, this list may have turned into 2010’s Biggest Badasses from The Expendables and The A-Team. Classic action was back in a big way in 2010, and I can only hope that 2011 gives us a few throwbacks in amongst the gigantic blockbusters so that 2011’s Badass list can be just as impressive.

Now, as it is with every year, expect spoilers throughout the list. Hope you guys have as much fun reading it as I did compiling it.

18. Quintus Dias, played by Michael Fassbender – Centurion

“In the chaos of battle, when the ground beneath your feet is a slurry of blood, puke, piss, and the entrails of friends and enemies alike, it’s easy to turn to the gods for salvation. But it’s soldiers who do the fighting, and soldiers who do they dying, and the gods never get their feet wet.”

Michael Fassbender‘s Quintus Dias isn’t some big epic hero like Maximus or William Wallace. Instead, he’s just a soldier stuck behind enemy lines trying to get home, and if he has to cut down thousands of savages and travel hundreds of miles to get out of there, then so be it. Like a Rambo in Roman armor, Dias uses cunning and the environment to make his way through hostile territory, fighting off all comers even as his compatriots die off one at a time. Braving the elements, being held face down in a bucket of urine, or being chased by an entire tribe of Picts won’t deter him; Dias can’t be broken and will not yield until he makes it back to Roman country or all that stand before him are cut down.
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