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Centurion reviews

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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 1:10 am

http://thebluemeaniesarecoming.blogspot.com/2010/08/centurion-2010.html

Saturday, 21 August 2010
Centurion (2010)
Director Neil Marshall
Certificate 15
IMDb Link Centurion (2010)

It's 117 AD, and the Roman invasion of Britain has ground to a halt, following a Pict raid on a Roman fort. Sole survivor Quintus Dias meets up with General Virilus' Ninth Legion, and they are soon ambushed by their enemy. Virilus is taken captive, and it's up to the Roman soldiers to rescue him. Stuck behind enemy lines, the men must survive against the mute warrior Etain, who is seeking revenge after being once raped by another Roman.

Here we have a film set at a time when the mighty Roman Empire were intent on invading Britian, but it could've just as easily been a western. Replace the Romans with cowboys and the Picts with Indians, and I'm sure the plot would still work.

The film is mostly in English, but partly subtitled. This is because we hear the Picts speaking Gaelic, althiugh their true language was apparently closer to Welsh. One Pict doesn't speak at all, as Olga Kurylenko plays the mute Etain, who's tongue was cut out after beig raped by a Roman. Now she is out for revenge, by killing as many Romans as possible.

As is to be expected, there's a lot of blood and gore. Some characters are beheaded, others are stabbed, some are shot wih arrows, and even a stag becomes lunch for our Roman heroes. General Virilus comes to a sticky end, which also features among the film's few outtakes available on the DVD.

I love films set during the times of the Roman Empire, and although set completely in Britain, this isn't too bad. Neil Marshall also directed Dog Soldiers and Doomsday, so if you've seen them, you'll know what to expect. Worth renting, although I advise not to watch it while eating your lunch!

Rating 3
Posted by Adam at 01:06
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 1:59 pm

http://tvandmoviereviews.com/tv-and-movie-reviews-is-talking-centurion/

TV and Movie Reviews is talking Centurion

http://tvandmoviereviews.com/8212010 movies trailers and more

TV and Movie Reviews is talking Centurion, out as a limited release on August 27th

CENTURION is set during the war between Roman soldiers and Pict tribesmen during the 2nd century Roman conquest of Britain. Michael Fassbender stars as Quintus Dias, Roman centurion and son of a legendary gladiator who leads a group of soldiers on a raid of a Pict camp to rescue a captured general (Dominic West). The son of the Pict leader is murdered during the raid, and the Romans find themselves hunted by a seemingly unstoppable group of the Pict’s most vicious and skilled warriors, led by a beautiful and deadly tracker (Olga Kurylenko), and hell bent on revenge.

Here’s what we think.. this looks really action packed and violent.. may favorite critics review was” Bloody good R-Rated fun. A perfect film to kick back and watch with a couple of beers and buds!”

Not one for the kiddies.. we have Centurion. Check out the trailer and tell me what you think
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 2:08 pm

http://moviereviewaction.blogspot.com/2010/08/centurion.html

Saturday, August 21, 2010
Centurion

Release Date: August 27th, 2010
Starring: Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, Olga Kurylenko, Noel Clarke, David Morrissey
Director: Neil Marshall
Studio: Magnet Releasing
Genre: Action, Adventure, Drama, Thriller, War
Runtime: 1 hour 37 minutes

The film events are dated AD 117. The main hero of this adventure drama is Quintus Dias, a Roman centurion. He is the only warrior who has survived after the Picts attacked a fort, situated on a Roman frontier. Together with the Ninth Legion, led by legendary General Vilrilus, Quintus goes his way to the North. Their mission is to wipe the Pict tribes and their leader Gorlacon off the face of the earth.
During the pitched battle against the Picts, the General of the Romans gets taken prisoner, and Quintus has to do everything possible to withstand the enemy’s onslaught and save his platoon alive behind their lines. The Roman soldiers make an attempt to rescue their leader and reach the Roman frontier – the only place, where they could be safe from their savage pursuers. At the same time the Picts are hell-bent to take revenge upon Romans for Gorlacon’s son, who has been killed during the battle.
“Centurion” offers the viewer great battle scenes set against a background of Scottish landscapes. The historical events of Roman Empire in times of invasion and conquest are shown in the film from scriptwriter and filmmaker Neil Marshall. The film stars such actors, as Michael Fassbender, Olga Kurylenko, Dominic West, David Morrissey and Noel Clarke.


Автор: TRUTH на 4:55 AM
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 2:17 pm

http://rickshq.blogspot.com/2010/08/review-centurion.html

Friday, August 20, 2010
Review: Centurion

It is 117 A.D. and the impressive Roman army is struggling to contain the Picts, the Celtic inhabitants of the Scottish highlands. One centurion, Dias (Michael Fassbender) is captured during a raid on a Roman outpost. He is later saved by The Ninth Legion who are making their way through the highlands using a Pictish guide, Etain (Olga Kurylenko). Once they are deep enough, Etain makes her move. She and her tribe descend on the army and deplete their ranks with ease. The remaining soldiers must brave the winter Scottish landscape and the increasingly deceptive Picts with their ever-improving guerrilla tactics to make it home. If only they knew where home was?

Michael Fassbender has a steadfast resolve fitting the soldier archetype but adding a kindness behind his eyes necessary for a likable protagonist. He is balanced out by Dominic West's smug swagger regardless of its fleeting nature. Olga makes up for the loss of her tongue with a quiet ferocity. The soldiers had great chemistry. Like real brothers, these brothers-in-arms are blunt and rude, as is the story. The cold landscape is covered with mud and blood. The violence and gore constantly reminds you that a successful horror director is behind this period piece showing no mercy to the victims of battle. While Fassbender and his love interest, Imogen Poots, perform admirably as individuals, their "love at first sight" relationship never feels genuine.

The movie dares to ask the question "where is home?" Dominic West and his men feel most comfortable in war, but Fassbender doesn't. They all have the same bravery and nobility, but I felt Fassbender was always looking to lay roots. Despite being bullied by Picts, Poots never leaves her home on their land, while Etain fights her way out of Roman hands to get back with her people. For roaming soldiers, such a question could be very deep, but it is never fully explored.

The Centurion has a decent premise with a fascinating question to answer, but seems wasted on violence and hamfisted Hollywood romance. It is still an entertaining thriller with some really great looking visuals and consistently performing actors.

6/10
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:20 pm

http://movies4dummies.blogspot.com/2010/08/centurion-2010.html?zx=eb0065d6ae8fc6bd

Saturday, August 21, 2010
Centurion (2010)

An elite legion of Roman soldiers in Britannia is massacred, leaving a handful of survivors to fight their way back to Roman held territory while being pursued by Pict's sworn to kill them. A fairly straight forward story, nothing too complex, just enough character development to make it more difficult than it should be to pick a side even though movie dogma already has dictated the winner. Very well played all around with an engaging plot. Just the right mix of action and tension, with a high degree of realism, especially the battles. If you enjoyed King Arthur (2004) chances are good you will enjoy this one as well. Recommended.
Posted by Jane Doe at 9:31 AM
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:52 pm

http://fliqcliq.wordpress.com/2010/08/20/when-in-rome-you-might-skip-centurion/

When in Rome, you might skip Centurion
Posted: August 20, 2010 by Aaron in Reviews

Centurion (2010)

Saw Centurion last night, which is going to get a limited re-release on August 27 (it got play at several film festivals stateside earlier this year). Overall, it was okay. I think there were two main flaws with the film, the first being that the chase aspect of the story was a bit underplayed, and the ending was fairly weak.

The Rundown: It’s a film that strives to be memorable action epics like 300 and Gladiator, but winds up being more like King Arthur and Pathfinder and ultimately forgettable. Some bloody action and decent chase sequence aren’t fully fledged in a 97-minute runtime and can’t make up for what amounts to be a fairly superficial story with a lackluster ending.

Rating: Cable It. The action and chase mean it’s not completely a waste of time, but don’t make it not a waste of $10 at the theater.

Before, i get into the plot summary and further explanations for my above complaints, I’ll talk a little bit about some of the film’s positives.

I think the acting was fine. Fassbender did his thing, which was basically transporting his performance from 300 to this film. West did what he needed to do. And all Kurylenko had to do was glower and look vicious, which she did competently. I wouldn’t say it was great acting, but at no point did I think it was poor.

The battle scenes weren’t great, but they weren’t bad either. My main complaint about them would be the amount of CGI blood. Personally, I’m not a fan of this. Especially in a movie as violent, gory, and bloody as this film. It works in a more stylistic setting like 300 (where everything is blue screen), but not in a film like this that has a much more realistic look to it and I believe is actually shot in the woods and on the mountain. I accepted it in 300, but then when Ninja Assassin came out, I was like “OK, it’s not that cool anymore.” And now with Centurion, it’s just like, “Stop. Please.”

Okay, spoilers ensue as I break down the plot (skip to the last paragraph if you want to avoid them)…

The story is about Roman centurion Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender) who is a Roman soldier along the northern frontier of Romanized Britain and the unconquered homeland of the Picts (basically Scotland for the historically uninitiated). He is captured by the Picts in a raid, tortured, but then manages to escape. While this is happening, down south the Roman governor of Britain sends the popular General Virilus (Dominic West) and his Ninth Legion to defeat the rebellious Picts once and for all. He sends a Pict scout, a mute but expert scout named Etain (Olga Kurylenko) to guide them. On their journey north, they rescue the escaping Dias, but soon after are betrayed by Etain, and the legion is massacred in an ambush. Virilus is captured, and Dias along with six other survivors go and try to rescue their beloved commander. When they sneak into the Pict camp, their attempts to rescue the general are thwarted by a returning war party. And during the confusion, one of their group Thax (played by J.J. Felid) manages to kill the teenage son of the Pict king. They flee without their commander before they are discovered and then proceed to go on the run. Of course, discovering his dead son, the Pict king dispatches Etain and others to hunt them down, but not before she kills Virilus in single combat. The group of seven then proceed on foot deeper behind enemy lines to evade their pursuers, but slowly and surely they are tracked down, and a few of their party die in the process. Eventually Dias and two others remain and come across a single Pict woman named Arianne (Imogen Poots) living alone in the woods, and she takes them in and heals their wounds, and you get your mini-love interest here between her and Dias. They rush to a nearby Roman garrison far north of the frontier, only to find it deserted and then proceed to have their last stand against their pursuers. Dias and another survive, kill Etain and her war party, and then make their way back to the safety of the frontier. They reunite with Thax, who had split from the group earlier, and Dias questions him about the king’s son he killed. As they approach the Roman lines, one of them is mistaken for a Pict and is killed, while Dias and Thax fight. Dias kills Thax, then meets with the governor. Fearing the political fallout of the obliteration of the Ninth Legion, the governor decides to simply wipe the record clean and pretend that they just disappeared. With Dias being a loose end, they try and kill him but fail. And realizing that the only place he is safe is with Arianne, he goes back to her, and I guess they live happily ever after.

The part I think I enjoyed the most and would have liked to see more of is the comraderie between the guys during the chase. The chase was the only real part of the movie that had any real suspense to it, but it didn’t completely win me over because I didn’t feel like we knew any of the soldiers. Sure, we got a nice scene where they were all introduced and got a basic rundown of their backgrounds, but other than Dias, I never felt like we knew any of them. So when they started dying, it had little emotional resonance. I think by making the film longer and spending more time with the chase and establishing some of these characters, it would have made this more satisfying.

And the ending is unsatisfying because it just seems like nothing got resolved. Thax had very good reasons to kill the son, to keep the group from being discovered as they tried to rescue their commander. I mentioned earlier that he was a teen, because I wanted to differentiate the fact that this wasn’t a six-year old, it was a kid around 12 or 13 that in that day would have been considered a young man. But then they later on play up the fact that Thax is villainous. When he and another soldier get separated from Dias group, they are being chased by wolves. Faking an injury, he manages to hamstring the other soldier after pleading for help, which of course means that the wolves go after his comrade rather than himself. And then at the end, for whatever reason Thax threatens Dias just as they are about to arrive at the frontier. It makes no sense. Dias has already figured out he killed the kid, but I highly doubt he was going to face any trouble from the Roman authorities for killing the son of their sworn enemy for the above reasons I stated. But for whatever reason, Thax proceeds to put a sword into Dias’ back, which of course Dias responds to by killing him.

And then you get the whole conspiracy aspect which is their way of explaining the popular legend of the disappearance of Ninth Legion.

But it is weak because the whole movie plays that the antagonist of the film is Etain, but after she is killed we get this additional 15 minutes of more villainy afoot, and it just feels tacked on and inconsequential. I don’t feel good that Thax and the Roman governor get their come-uppance

And I know it’s been overly negative review of this film, I don’t think it was a bad movie. It’s just not really memorable. It’s like King Arthur that came out a few years ago. It’s a decent flick, but within 48 hours you’ll have forgotten you saw it and you won’t feel overly entertained by it. For King Arthur, unless you’re a huge Clive Owen or Keira Knightley fan, there’s no reason to check that movie out more than once. And it’s the same for this, unless you’re a big Fassbender fan, or like seeing a brutalized Kurylenko (she’s only semi-attractive in one scene in this movie, the first one and that’s it), then there’s really no reason to give this film a second viewing.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:55 pm

http://www.imfreakz.com/competition/movie/watch-centurion-movie-online.html

Watch Centurion Movie Online
Thursday, August 19th, 2010

With a raucous, gruesome tone, this Roman-era British action movie takes us back in time in such a vivid way that we often feel a bit queasy while watching. If the story were stronger, we’d be glued to the screen.

Quintus Dias (Fassbender) seems to be an unusually lucky centurion. Stationed in the nastiest outpost on the edge of the Roman Empire in Britain, he’s the only survivor of a Pict attack by the vindictive Gorlacon (Thomsen). So he teams with General Virilus (West) and heads back into the hot zone. Again, the Picts launch a devastating attack. This time seven Romans survive, and it becomes a cat-and-mouse chase as mute huntress Etain (Kurylenko) tenaciously tracks Quintus and company across the Highlands. Can they make it back to safety in the south?

The film’s contained narrative makes it very watchable, as writer-director Marshall avoids overarching themes for unruly battles and gritty violence.

Although this creates a problem in that the film seems to grind to a halt in between the action scenes, with lots of grunting banter as well as a hesitant romantic sideroad as the survivors encounter a friendly outcast (Poots) who’s improbably gorgeous even with a big scar on her face.

Furthering the implausibility factor is the politically correct diversity of the Romans, which includes an African (Clarke), a central Asian (Ahmed) and a range of hotheads, comedians, tough guys and traitors. Marshall gets away with this simply because the actors are all seriously gifted, creating watchable characters we really root for as their lives are put in jeopardy again and again. And as always, Fassbender holds the film together almost effortlessly.

Marshall is very good at creating pounding suspense and refusing to shy away from real grisliness. The battles are invested with an almost crazed brutality that feels genuinely terrifying and perhaps more realistic that what we usually see in these kinds of movies. He also drenches the film in filth: mud, blood, spit, half-digested food and various bodily fluids abound. This is colourful, lurid filmmaking that threatens to wear us out with its relentless nastiness.

So if the human story at the centre feels a little dry in comparison, at least it adds some meaning.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:56 pm

http://hagiblog.wordpress.com/2010/08/19/toronto-after-dark-2010-day-6/

Toronto After Dark 2010 – Day 6
Posted on August 19, 2010 by The Film Reel

This will be a very short post, not from lack of fun at TAD but from my complete lack of brain power and the fact that I have about 10 minutes before I need to get the hell out of here to be on time! HAHA!

Wednesday was the day where I had the least to look forward too. I was interested to see both films, Centurion and Heartless but neither really struck me. I’ve never been a fan of the fantasy/epic kind of thing but Centurion is directed by Neil Marshall. Hard to say no to that and I actually enjoyed it. It wasn’t mind-blowing but the action was great and a couple of the characters were really fun. I had read a review where someone felt the love story that came in about half way slowed the film down but it was literally over in 5 minutes before it was back to the action so I’m not sure how that could kill the flick. It wasn’t a blockbuster but it was fun to watch.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 3:25 am

http://dorkshelf.com/2010/08/22/tad-2010-centurion-review/

2010
Centurion Review
film
By Will
August 22, 2010

When British director Neil Marshall isn’t making excellent horror films like Dog Soldiers and The Descent, he is making action movies. Fairly mediocre action movies. His last attempt at the action genre, the post-apocalyptic Doomsday, was both a critical and financial failure. Which was why I was skeptical about Marshall’s next crack at the action genre, Centurion, a men on a mission film set in Roman Britain. Does the director redeem himself with this sword and sandals thriller, or should he just go back to doing what he does best?

Spoilers to follow.

The Roman Empire is at its peak, spanning from Egypt in the south to Britain in the north. from Spain in the west to Syria in the east. Her borders are in a state of constant conflict, as the natives of these far reaches are not eager to be added to the ranks of the conquered. One such conflict rages in the province of Britannia, where the local Roman governor tasks General Titus Virilus (Dominic West) with wiping out the Pictish resistance in the far north. With the aid of a Pict tracker named Etain (Olga Kurylenko) the General and his 9th Legion are certain their campaign will be successful. Predictably Etain turns coat and leads the army into a trap; the legion is decimated and its general kidnapped. It is then up to a band of survivors, led by Legionnaire Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender), to rescue the general and escape back to friendly soil.

It’s a great setup, but one that only partially fulfills its promise by the end. As I mentioned in my review of The Expendables, half the fun of the men on a mission film is hearing about the character’s backstories and seeing how they fit in with the group. In Centurion we get only a few very short scenes for character development. Each soldier is given maybe a sentence worth of exposition, if they were lucky, to explain who they are and where they were from. I only ended up caring about a few of the good guys, particularly the grizzled veteran Brick (Liam Cunningham). He has got the classic “I’m too old for this s$#!” routine and is given some of the best lines and most badass moments in the entire film. Aside from Fassbender’s character, I just didn’t care about any of the others.

Then there is the Roman formality filmmakers often imbue these period pictures with. Overly ceremonious dialogue fits the military tone of the film, but serves to further alienate the audience from the characters. When Fassbender isn’t narrating the film, he’s speaking to the other characters in decorous absolutes that would make the most skilled orators blush. Inspiring? Maybe. But pretty speech and fancy words may not be exactly what these guys want to hear with arrows, axes and clubs are raining down on them.

Speaking of sharp objects flying at our heroes, Centurion is bloody awesome in this respect. Literally. The action is well staged and does not let up for the entire film. If there is one thing the movie does well, it’s capture the brutality of Iron Age combat. Warriors on both sides are cut, stabbed, hacked, speared, bludgeoned, dismembered and decapitated in all manner of horrible ways. Centurion is a parade of gore, tantamount to a two hour lesson in what a Roman gladius can do to a man.

When blood isn’t flowing on screen, the audience is treated to beautiful Lord of the Rings style helicopter shots of our heroes charging through fields, forests and mountains. It’s amazing what a nice landscape can do for a film, adding needed scope and grandeur to what would otherwise be a very claustraphobic chase movie. The impressive costumes and big sets also aid the film in looking bigger than its budget. The film offers blockbuster spectacle on a shoestring budget of only $25 million.

Centurion could easily have been another mediocre effort by Marshall if it were not for the combination of amazing action, a great cast and above average production values. Sadly, paper thin characters, some hokey dialogue and an overly long third act spoil the show, ultimately making the historical actioner an only slightly above-average film.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:11 pm

http://thetfs.ca/2010/08/22/review-centurion-tad-2010/

Review: Centurion – TAD 2010

Posted by Katarina Gligorijevic on August 22, 2010 · Comments (0)

Fighting Roman soldier in CenturionLet me start by saying that I’m a big Neil Marhsall fan. Dog Soldiers really blew my mind when a more in-the-know pal introduced me to it in the early 2000′s. The Descent made me hyperventilate so much that I had to watch most of it through closed eyes, and it still scared the living hell out of me. I thought Doomsday delivered more fun for my movie-going buck than most blockbuster action titles. So, when I heard he was going to tell the tale of a lost Roman legion that disappeared in the icy and inhospitable land of the Picts (Scotland, or thereabouts) and that it would star Dominic West (dreamy McNulty from The Wire) I was immediately sold. And, as it turns out, the film delivers – somewhat.

The story isn’t as inventive as I was expecting from Marshall, who’s dabbled in werewolves, monsters and roving post-apocalyptic gangs of ne’er-do-wells. As it turns out, nothing too mysterious is going on. The Romans “disappeared” because they were out-maneuvered by the locals, who, in addition to being tougher, were also used to the rough terrain. The episode was an embarrassment to the Empire, who chose to strike it from the records. The plot of Centurion isn’t quite that banal, though.

The story follows Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender), the sole survivor of a previous Pict raid, as he joins forces with General Titus Virilus (West) and his 9th Legion on a doomed mission to wipe out the Picts. Betrayed by their mute guide Etain (former Bond girl Olga Kurylenko) and ambushed by Picts, a small group of survivors from the once mighty Legion has to make their way through the countryside to the nearest Roman outpost.

The Pict leader, Gorlacon, is well played by a grim-faced Ulrich Thomsen, a talented Dane who I’ve basically been in love with since 1998′s Festen (The Celebration). Kurylenko is pretty great in her silent, pouty glare and the 100A.D. version of ‘smokey eyes’. Battle sequences are bloody and satisfying (there’s at least one great eye-stabbing scene), but unfortunately it’s pretty easy to see where the plot is going fairly early on, and especially after the introduction of a would-be romantic interest for Fassbender, the witch Arianne (Imogen Poots).

All that said, Centurion is still more than worth seeing for West’s haggard, scared face and beefy, blood-soaked, shirtless torso, which makes several appearances throughout. It’s not Marshall’s best, but it’s a more than adequate sword and sandal bloodbath, and fans of gory hand-to-hand combat in period costume won’t be disappointed.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:11 pm

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TAD 2010 – Centurion – Film Reel Reviews
Posted on August 22, 2010 by The Film Reel

Some great battle scenes but I was left feeling that the film was mediocre. – Will

A small group of surviving Roman soldiers must escape from behind enemy lines when their army is attacked and decimated.

Written and Directed by – Neil Marshall

Starring – Michael Fassbender, Andreas Wisniewski, Dave Legeno, Axelle Carolyn, Dominic West, JJ Feild, Lee Ross, Cavid Morrissey, Ulrich Thomsen, Olga Kurylenko

I’m sure that my saying the film is mediocre translates into a great film for someone who is a fan of the genre. I’ve never really been big on the fantasy epic flicks, anything involving soldiers, dwarves, elves, dragons, all that medieval stuff with guys wandering through the forests. I prefer my forest flicks to contain dumb teenagers and a killer in a mask. That being said I did enjoy Centurion, it just didn’t blow me away. There are some great battles fought in the film and Olga Kurylenko as Etain was great fun to watch. Etain is a tracker who can find anyone and she certainly stands her ground among the men of the Roman army.

The problem I always have with these fantasy films is the excessive amount of travelling from one place to another that always happens. Obviously it’s a logical thing to do, they can’t just get in their plane and fly there, but I’m always left bored by the walking around. All that walking does lead to some incredible scenery though. Large sweeping shots of mountains and forests provide a beautiful backdrop to the film and I would love to visit the areas where this film was shot. Quite breathtaking actually. I didn’t come to the flick to see nice scenery though, I came for some good old fashion action and there’s plenty of battle scenes.

With their massive army slaughtered, the few survivors must try to escape and return home.

It’s been a few days since I’ve seen this film and I have to admit that thinking back on it gives it a better review. The characters were well done and I actually cared about what would happen to them, the battles were impressive and typically very large and the film looks great. The only real negative I can give it is that it just isn’t my kind of flick. Anyone out there who really enjoys this style will probably find lots to love about Centurion. My main draw to it was Neil Marshall. I’ve only seen a little bit of his work really so I was interested in seeing how a fantasy flick would be handled by him. He does a great job and his writing is even better, creating characters that I actually wanted to see survive and triumph.

Etain was my favorite character. She doesn't speak but she's quite the badass!

Etain winds up being my favorite character of the film. She’s a complete badass and it doesn’t hurt that Olga Kurylenko is a very attractive woman. I know she’s the bad guy in the movie but I couldn’t help but want to cheer for her as she stood toe to toe with the men of the Roman army. Not only can she hold her ground against the men but she’s a brutal warrior. At one point she catches an escaping soldier and proceeds to chop his head off with an axe. It was bloody, taking a few chops before his head is finally detached from his body.

I guess that’s the other great thing about this flick. It is full of blood. Body parts flying everywhere, blood splashing against the ground, Marshall doesn’t hold back on the gore for the battle sequences and it jacks the action up quite a bit. I always find these scenes to be sensory overload with swords and arrows flying, quick cuts between soldiers fighting and blood everywhere. It’s a lot to take in so quickly but I can imagine that’s what a battle like this would be like, pure insanity. Fans of the genre will find a great flick here for them and I’d recommend checking it out.

Under the marquee – Will
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:24 pm

http://dorkshelf.com/2010/08/22/tad-2010-centurion-review/

2010
Centurion Review
film
By Will
August 22, 2010

When British director Neil Marshall isn’t making excellent horror films like Dog Soldiers and The Descent, he is making action movies. Fairly mediocre action movies. His last attempt at the action genre, the post-apocalyptic Doomsday, was both a critical and financial failure. Which was why I was skeptical about Marshall’s next crack at the action genre, Centurion, a men on a mission film set in Roman Britain. Does the director redeem himself with this sword and sandals thriller, or should he just go back to doing what he does best?

Spoilers to follow.

The Roman Empire is at its peak, spanning from Egypt in the south to Britain in the north. from Spain in the west to Syria in the east. Her borders are in a state of constant conflict, as the natives of these far reaches are not eager to be added to the ranks of the conquered. One such conflict rages in the province of Britannia, where the local Roman governor tasks General Titus Virilus (Dominic West) with wiping out the Pictish resistance in the far north. With the aid of a Pict tracker named Etain (Olga Kurylenko) the General and his 9th Legion are certain their campaign will be successful. Predictably Etain turns coat and leads the army into a trap; the legion is decimated and its general kidnapped. It is then up to a band of survivors, led by Legionnaire Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender), to rescue the general and escape back to friendly soil.

It’s a great setup, but one that only partially fulfills its promise by the end. As I mentioned in my review of The Expendables, half the fun of the men on a mission film is hearing about the character’s backstories and seeing how they fit in with the group. In Centurion we get only a few very short scenes for character development. Each soldier is given maybe a sentence worth of exposition, if they were lucky, to explain who they are and where they were from. I only ended up caring about a few of the good guys, particularly the grizzled veteran Brick (Liam Cunningham). He has got the classic “I’m too old for this s$#!” routine and is given some of the best lines and most badass moments in the entire film. Aside from Fassbender’s character, I just didn’t care about any of the others.

Then there is the Roman formality filmmakers often imbue these period pictures with. Overly ceremonious dialogue fits the military tone of the film, but serves to further alienate the audience from the characters. When Fassbender isn’t narrating the film, he’s speaking to the other characters in decorous absolutes that would make the most skilled orators blush. Inspiring? Maybe. But pretty speech and fancy words may not be exactly what these guys want to hear with arrows, axes and clubs are raining down on them.

Speaking of sharp objects flying at our heroes, Centurion is bloody awesome in this respect. Literally. The action is well staged and does not let up for the entire film. If there is one thing the movie does well, it’s capture the brutality of Iron Age combat. Warriors on both sides are cut, stabbed, hacked, speared, bludgeoned, dismembered and decapitated in all manner of horrible ways. Centurion is a parade of gore, tantamount to a two hour lesson in what a Roman gladius can do to a man.

When blood isn’t flowing on screen, the audience is treated to beautiful Lord of the Rings style helicopter shots of our heroes charging through fields, forests and mountains. It’s amazing what a nice landscape can do for a film, adding needed scope and grandeur to what would otherwise be a very claustraphobic chase movie. The impressive costumes and big sets also aid the film in looking bigger than its budget. The film offers blockbuster spectacle on a shoestring budget of only $25 million.

Centurion could easily have been another mediocre effort by Marshall if it were not for the combination of amazing action, a great cast and above average production values. Sadly, paper thin characters, some hokey dialogue and an overly long third act spoil the show, ultimately making the historical actioner an only slightly above-average film.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:30 pm

http://filmape.blogspot.com/2010/08/box-office-review-centurion.html

Saturday, August 21, 2010
Box Office Review - Centurion
The sword and sandal genre hasn't had a good entry since 2000s Gladiator. Neil Marshall attempts to give the genre a boost by making a brutal and bloody story about Roman soldiers trapped behind enemy lines. Unfortunately Centurion does nothing to revive the sword and sandal genre.

There are many problems with this film. At first the story seems rather simple. Michael Fassbender plays Quintus the lone survivor of a Pictish raid on a Roman fort. After escaping from the clutches of the Picts he ends up with the Ninth legion. The legion gets massacred and a small group of survivors have to try to get to Roman territory before they are slaughtered by the almost supernatural warrior played by Olga Kurylenko. The movie is almost entirely a chase movie which is cool, but near the end of the movie there are some character reveals that are ridiculous and unnecessary. Plus once the characters do end up in Roman friendly territory there is a weird twist that just comes out of the blue.

This movie gets so caught up in adding layers to its story that the characters never are fleshed out or developed. All the characters whether good or bad are all one note. Quintus is a born leader who never sways from his loyalty to the Roman army. The warrior woman only focus is on catching her prey, and the character has had her tongue cut out, so she basically is the Terminator without any lines. The film never establishes a connection between the audience and the characters. Thus I never cared about their quest.

Along the journey of the characters there are multiple action scenes that fail to thrill. The movie uses cg blood and it looks cartoonish and terrible. All the scenes involve close combat sword fighting and are dark and gritty scenes except for all the bright red blood spewing from the bodies. I have no idea how filmmakers especially ones who specialise in genre filmmaking are okay using computer generated blood. Unless it looks as good as practical effects it should never be used.

Everything about this movie is underwhelming and uninspiring. There is one scene where Quintus is buried in a ditch by freshly killed bodies, which is something I haven't seen before. A movie needs plenty more than a good thirty second scene to make it a worthwhile watch. If only this movie was a five minute short instead of an hour and a half feature.

A Banana Peel
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 1:55 pm

http://danielgarber.wordpress.com/2010/08/20/august-grab-bag-movies-reviewed-eat-pray-love-centurion-scott-pilgrim-vs-the-world/

“Centurion”

Dir: Neil Marshall

I went to this movie, at Toronto After Dark Festival, partly because Michael Fassbender was in the main role. He was amazing in two British movies over the last couple years: “Hunger”, about IRA Bobby Sands’s prison hunger strike and a coming of age drama, “Fish Tank”. This movie, while set in the British Isles, is…a little bit different. To say the least.

This is a sword and sandals epic, about the period when the Roman soldiers fought against the picts. This was way before all those nouveau immigrants, those Angles, Jutes and Saxons moved in and spoiled the neighbourhood. This was way back when. So in a big battle, the Roman legions were there fighting those Picts up in the north.

They’re tough mofos, those picts are, with all their pictish ways, and blue face paint. Don’t mess with them. But the Romans are tough too. Anyway, there’s battle after battle and skirmish after skirmish before the actually story takes off. Lots of splatt, and uggh, and aaah, as another head gets chopped off and plopped into a water barrel. Anyway… so Quintas Dias (“I am a soldier of Rome, I will not yield!”) a centurian, and a pict by birth, has been training for fighting since his childhood. He speaks the local language, and knows the way around. After the failed attempt to beat the locals, he just wants to rescue a Roman general and call it a day. But in their botched attempt, someone in his multi-cultural platoon does something that sets the whole tribe against them — till the death. They have to escape and make it back to the main Roman legion. So there are lots of scenic mountains and rivers and waterfalls as they try to outwit the dangerous picts and an expert tracker who always seems to find them, a fur-clad and mute lisbeth salander-type rival, played by the striking Olga Kurylenko. I started to get dizzy when I thought of all the swooping airplanes they had to rent to shoot this movie – it felt like every second scene had to start with a swooshing aerial view of where they were fighting next.

And on the way, they encounter a pictish witch to add a further dimension to the story. I liked it, just for it’s bigness. I got bored of all the killing and stabbing and stuff, but it brightened a bit in the second half. If you like very bloody, Roman big-screen war movies, then this is the movie for you. (I liked it better than “Gladiator” and the very plastic-looking “Troy”, but that’s not saying much.)
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Sun Aug 22, 2010 11:57 pm

http://damncool.com/2010/08/22/centurion-2010/

Centurion (2010)

Centurion is a British film written and directed by Neil Marshall. Marshall also wrote and directed “The Descent (2005)” and “Dog Soldiers”.
The Centurion

The Centurion

The “Centurion” (Michael Fassbender) is sent in with the ill-fated Ninth Legion to Caledonia to destroy the Picts. Instead it’s the Legion that gets destroyed and the Centurion leads a small group trying to save themselves.

Lot’s of blood and fighting–from beginning to end. Everybody but the Centurion seems to be a bad guy, it was hard to decide just who I wanted to survive.

Loved the action, but the story didn’t grab me—06-10
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 12:04 am

http://thetfs.ca/2010/08/22/review-centurion-tad-2010/

Review: Centurion – TAD 2010

Posted by Katarina Gligorijevic on August 22, 2010 · 0 Comments

Fighting Roman soldier in CenturionLet me start by saying that I’m a big Neil Marhsall fan. Dog Soldiers really blew my mind when a more in-the-know pal introduced me to it in the early 2000′s. The Descent made me hyperventilate so much that I had to watch most of it through closed eyes, and it still scared the living hell out of me. I thought Doomsday delivered more fun for my movie-going buck than most blockbuster action titles. So, when I heard he was going to tell the tale of a lost Roman legion that disappeared in the icy and inhospitable land of the Picts (Scotland, or thereabouts) and that it would star Dominic West (dreamy McNulty from The Wire) I was immediately sold. And, as it turns out, the film delivers – somewhat.

The story isn’t as inventive as I was expecting from Marshall, who’s dabbled in werewolves, monsters and roving post-apocalyptic gangs of ne’er-do-wells. As it turns out, nothing too mysterious is going on. The Romans “disappeared” because they were out-maneuvered by the locals, who, in addition to being tougher, were also used to the rough terrain. The episode was an embarrassment to the Empire, who chose to strike it from the records. The plot of Centurion isn’t quite that banal, though.

The story follows Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender), the sole survivor of a previous Pict raid, as he joins forces with General Titus Virilus (West) and his 9th Legion on a doomed mission to wipe out the Picts. Betrayed by their mute guide Etain (former Bond girl Olga Kurylenko) and ambushed by Picts, a small group of survivors from the once mighty Legion has to make their way through the countryside to the nearest Roman outpost.

The Pict leader, Gorlacon, is well played by a grim-faced Ulrich Thomsen, a talented Dane who I’ve basically been in love with since 1998′s Festen (The Celebration). Kurylenko is pretty great in her silent, pouty glare and the 100A.D. version of ‘smokey eyes’. Battle sequences are bloody and satisfying (there’s at least one great eye-stabbing scene), but unfortunately it’s pretty easy to see where the plot is going fairly early on, and especially after the introduction of a would-be romantic interest for Fassbender, the witch Arianne (Imogen Poots).

All that said, Centurion is still more than worth seeing for West’s haggard, scared face and beefy, blood-soaked, shirtless torso, which makes several appearances throughout. It’s not Marshall’s best, but it’s a more than adequate sword and sandal bloodbath, and fans of gory hand-to-hand combat in period costume won’t be disappointed.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 12:30 am

http://www.411mania.com/movies/film_reviews/150081

Centurion Review
Posted by Erik Luers on 08.23.2010

Gory fluff which works well...

Michael Fassbender ... Centurion Quintus Dias
Olga Kurylenko ... Etain
Imogen Poots ... Arianne
Dominic West ... General Titus Virilus
Ulrich Thomsen ... Gorlacon

Oh how quickly the seasons tend to come and go. As the summer comes to a close, there is talk, as there always seems to be, about whether or not this moviegoing season successfully bridged the ever widening gap between art and commerce. Going through the list of mega-blockbusters, the number one film of the summer (and so far, the year) is Toy Story 3, a sequel from Pixar. Another highly successful film was not only a sequel but based on a pre-sold property, a teen novel: The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. No, only Christopher Nolan's expertly made Inception, large-budgeted as it may have been, can be defined as an original work, grossing blockbuster numbers while being based on nothing other than itself. Looking further down the money maker list, there are the mid-level successes such as Salt, The Other Guys, and Grown Ups. And now we find ourselves in late August, a time which always seems to bring out the smaller, riskier films with niche audiences and dim financial prospects; next weekend (8/27 – 8/29) will prove to be the quietest weekend in Hollywood since the weekend before the opening of Iron Man 2 back in May. And yet, there is a fun, energy-pumping new work from writer/director Neil Marshall, the man behind another late August release (albeit back in 2006), The Descent, that a lot of people will really get a kick out of. It's fast moving, violent, great to look at, and simple enough to work on a purely visceral and primal level. Thinking back, it's hard to remember what you liked so much about it, but damn if it wasn't fun while it played out there on the big screen. It's dopey and crude, but never offensive, and perhaps that's all we can ask for at this time of year.

The film in question is Centurion, a “sword and sandal” epic which features no sand and runs a scant hundred minutes or so. If you think you know how this movie plays out, chances are you're probably right. We have the Roman, Anglo-Saxon whites (with very few other ethnicities sprinkled in) versus the nomadic and grungy-looking bad guys who appear like they just walked off the Battlesfield Earth movie poster. Chronologically speaking, we are not yet a few hundred years removed from the death of Jesus Christ, and our protagonists are known as the Ninth Legion, a collective group of Romans whom were ultimately betrayed and defeated, although not necessarily by the same faction. They were fighting a losing battle and, rather than suffer a loss that would squander Roman morale, were being wiped from the record books by their government. Draw your own American/Iraq parallels here.

While the film is a little stingy on the details, a Q & A with Marshall which took place after the screening – not to mention a quick and insightful trip to Google upon arriving home – helped this particular writer to understand the historical context in which the movie plays. Sure, there is the obligatory onscreen text at the beginning of the film (par for the course for any film which takes place before 1960, it would seem), but I would argue that we have become inured to it thanks to how little (the film assumes) we knew going in. The textual backstory should really come at the end of the movie, for by then some of the headscratching names will be a little more familiar and will allow us to connect the names to the faces and the locations to the scenic view of the settings. Centurion strives to be historically accurate while all we really care about is whether or not it's historically sufficient. After all, there is computer-generated blood to be shed.

As the film gets going, our main character, Quintus (played by the hardworking Michael Fassbender), is kidnapped early on by the enemy, the Brits of Norfolk we assume (although some speak a mix between Scottish and Gaillac, so......), tortured, and then locked away in a small wooden shack. If you think he has it bad, you should see some of his other men (i.e., the slaughtered). Persistent and strong willed, Quintus manages to break free and start the journey back to his soldiers, unexpectedly coming across his Roman brothers not long after. And so a big battle soon takes place between the Romans and the Brits (who want Quintus back in their possession), complete with giant fireballs, throat-slitting, arrow-shooting, and glorious beheadings, leaving all but a few of the Roman soldiers dead. The Ninth Legion is no more. Among a sea of fallen bodies, a few select men, lead by the wounded but still alive Quintus, head off to tell the higher-ups of their defeat, given they can survive the long trek back to them. But they are never safe. Etain (Olga Kurylenko), a spiritual, traitorous, blood thirsty warrior, is hot on their heels, tracking their scent like a trained dog and overly dedicated assassin. She may be more dangerous than any one man, for she has the inside information and dramatic backstory that a super-villain must have. Years ago, Etain and her family were raped by Romans – she even had her tongue cut out by one of them – and her burning desire is now to collect as much Roman blood and ashes as possible as a sign of revenge. Her undying one-track mind would undoubtedly make her the number one draft pick for any Greco-Roman sports team.

As its very core, Centurion is crafted like a road trip/chase movie, focusing on a small camaraderie who keep moving forward while remembering to have eyes in the back of their heads. They have minimal resources (one man is a cook and has some sound advice on lethal mushrooms), and therefore must trust in each other's savvy warrior intuition and skills in order to stay the course. And what a beautiful course it turns out to be. Marshall and his cinematographer,Sam McCurdy, present the viewer with some of Scotland's most remarkably vast landscapes, from snow-covered plateaus and mountains that appear to go on for miles to the elegantly calm and peaceful forests which sparkle with greenery and sunshine. Marshall may have puts his actors (and location scouts) through hell while working on this movie, but the visual juxtaposing between the cold and warm environments that our characters hike through helps to emphasize the incredibly taxing journey. In freezing cold temperatures, the men are safe from intruders but are at the mercy of the brutal weather. In the woods, the men are supported by the temperature but are prime targets for Etain and her pact. No matter the budget, Marshall makes Centurion look like a gory, politically driven thriller on a grand scale, encompassing numerous picturesque landscapes.

Less a film for history buffs than KNG EFX. Group worshipers, Marshall's film, as morbid as this may sound, is at its creative peak when delving up ways to kill off its game cast. If you've been waiting for a film where a man gets a spear to the genitals while urinating, then Centurion is for you. Felt mainstream cinema has been sorely lacking in realistic beheadings and all the strenuous back-and-forth cutting of the throat that goes along with it? There is no longer a need to be frustrated. Men get their skulls bashed in and animals get their intestines sliced out. A woman (the director's wife, no less) gets an arrow shoved through her eye late in the picture. One man gets a spike through the torso and continues to push it through his body and into his enemy standing behind him. One poor chap gets hit with a bunch of arrows and then falls one hundred feet to the rocky water below. Another gets a sword right into the heart. Needless to say, the film is quite extreme in the carnage it depicts, but if this doesn't make it more realistic, it sure as hell makes it more flashy. Much of the murder and mayhem is over the top, and yet you may feel gleefully barbarous while watching it. It's as if you are in a Roman coliseum, cheering on the death of the next unlucky sucker. It's a perverse, brutalized sense of fun with a body count in the thousands.

Even a late, old school, romantic subplot works, specifically because the two actors involved possess a timeless feel within their distinct facial features. Fassbender looks like an old stoic male movie star, while the lovely Imogen Poots has a natural beauty which seems to be lacking in most motion picture ingénues these days. Their characters' relationship builds out of mutual respect for one another, two outcasts fighting for survival against the scary Brits. Put another way, they are more consensual than sexual. When push comes to shove, we find them easy to root for.

Etain and Arianne (Poots' character) allow Neil Marshall to show how women retaliate against the men who have done them wrong; Etain chooses to kill them, while Arianne decides to house and protect her people's enemies. For being kind and caring, the young woman is of course deemed a witch. If The Descent was about women working together in order to stay alive and destroy the enemy, Centurion shows us women motivated by their own personal need for retribution. Marshall may very well be a male feminist. In an age before sexism, the director pointed at the after-screening discussion, women were fighting alongside their men as equals. And they were just as sick and twisted as the rest of them. All's fair in love and war, I suppose. Now start recruiting your friends.


The 411: Neil Marshall is becoming quite the strong genre director. His latest offering, Centurion, while no great classic, is a fun, mindless movie with style. Its violence will make you wince, and its story will have you eager to rush home and read up on your Roman history. Is the film historically accurate? To a point. Have no fear though, the film is easygoing viewing for people with a strong stomach. You came to see blood, and Marshall delivers. Some of it is gloppy makeup, some of it is CG. Normally, the computerized fake stuff irks me, but not here. The whole film is a fantasy (well, for the winning side, anyway) that is less concerned with lecturing the audience than with providing them with a good time. It delivers machismo action porn for the bloodthirsty enthusiast. It wears its guts on its sleeve.

Final Score: 7.0 [ Good ] legend
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 9:53 pm

http://www.dreadcentral.com/reviews/centurion-2010

Centurion (2010)

* Axelle Carolyn
* Centurion
* Dominic West
* Magnet
* Michael Fassbender
* Neil Marshall

Starring Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, Olga Kurylenko, David Morrissey, Axelle Carolyn, Ulrich Thomsen, Imogen Poots, Liam Cunningham

Directed by Neil Marshall

I may be in the minority, but I absolutely adore every frame of Neil Marshall’s Doomsday. Sure, The Descent is among the very best cinematic reasons to be terrified of the dark and Dog Soldiers just so happens to be the greatest werewolf movie of the last ten years, but it’s the delirious amalgamation of Mad Max 2 and Escape from New York that really made me want to sing Marshall’s praises from the mountaintop.

His latest film, Centurion, has finally reached the United States, and while it functions a bit outside the confines of the horror genre, this historical adventure is a rollicking good time, complete with enough sheer brutality to satiate the director’s most ardent fans. But there’s more to commend than just the liberal doses of violence and brutality. Marshall has stacked his production with a strong cast, stunning cinematography by his regular DP Sam McCurdy and lavish production design by Simon Bowles (another repeat partner) that boosts the authenticity in a way that puts some Hollywood productions to shame (with a fraction of the budget to boot).

The story concerns a handful of Roman soldiers who find themselves stranded behind the enemy lines of a Celtic tribe of savages called the Picts. As they try and make their way back to the nearest Roman garrison, they’re pursued by a vengeful group of warriors who’ve sworn to hunt them to their death. Marshall draws obvious inspiration from The Warriors (so much so that Walter Hill is thanked in the end credits) without ever becoming derivative. His film shares some rough similarities with everyone’s favorite gang of Coney Island badasses, but he infuses the story with a radically different tone and feel that’s given further distinction by its flirtation with actual history (i.e., the historical disappearance of Rome’s Ninth Legion). Centurion is essentially one long chase scene, and the story is well complemented by Chris Gill's rapid-fire editing to create a film whose entire look and feel matches the plot, sustaining a poetic rhythm in both execution and design.

But none of it would’ve worked had Marshall not stacked the deck with a cast of very talented actors. The film doesn’t slow down long enough for us to spend much time with these guys, but the broad strokes with which they’re painted give them a strong enough sense of person – further fleshed out by casting solid performers in each role. Michael Fassbender has both the charisma and likability to lead this band of haggard survivors across hostile terrain with the grim responsibility of his burden always lingering on his face. Dominic West has limited screen time as fierce Roman General Virilus (even the name is manly!) whose bravado inspires loyalty in his men while Liam Cunningham stands out as the salty old dog with some of the most crowd-pleasing lines but also some quieter moments that make him a character worth rooting for.

CenturionOlga Kurylenko is the resident villainess, a feral tracker whose bloodlust is motivated exclusively by revenge. Her character is without a tongue, which means Kurylenko doesn’t say a single word, instead managing an imposing presence through rage-laden eyes. And she walks the walk, too - obliterating foes with a flurry of vicious and believable fight scenes. More importantly, she never becomes a one-dimensional antagonist. Even at her coldest there are traces of humility and remorse in her actions; Kurylenko succeeds in creating a character of depth – no small feat here. Alongside her is Axelle Carolyn as a Pictish marksman who unleashes some nasty carnage courtesy of a bow and arrow. She handles the physicality of the role with as much weight and believability as Kurylenko, effortlessly handling the action reins in one particularly brutal and bloody fight to the death. Marshall is never afraid of putting his female stars through the physical paces, and considering his successful track record (Shauna Macdonald and Natalie Mendoza in The Descent and Rhona Mitra in Doomsday), it’s not hard to understand why.

What I really like about Marshall’s continued choice of actors is that he remains a firm believer in subtle performances. One of Doomsday’s best moments comes when Malcolm McDowell asks Rhona Mitra what she has ever lost in life. Instead of a typical long-winded retort, Marshall cuts back to Mitra’s expressive eyes as she processes the tragedy without saying a word. And there’s more of that happening throughout Centurion. Marshall’s characters aren’t always compelled to say what they’re thinking, and the internalized performances of his cast do the kind of heavy lifting that makes things both more interesting and textured.

CenturionCenturion is a rough and tumble action flick, and Marshall doesn’t hold anything back when it comes to carnage, striking the perfect balance between the believable and fantastical. People are outright obliterated by axes, arrows, pikes and swords in the grisliest of ways in order to effectively place the viewer amidst the vivid chaos. But Marshall isn’t too straight-faced to have a little fun while he’s splattering the red stuff around – like when someone is slammed full-force into a tree, only to have his skull explode into bone fragments and gore! As expected, the violence is largely of the CGI kind, but Marshall’s handling of it is deft – cutting away just before one’s eye can fully detect it.

With Centurion, Marshall is 4/4 when it comes to his filmography. This one was built for the big screen (which, admittedly, I haven’t yet experienced – mine was a high definition rental on Xbox Live). If you have the means to catch this in theaters, do it. While my setup is definitely optimal, I couldn’t help but feel as though I was robbing myself of some of the film’s epic grandeur by watching it in my living room. It’s a thrilling adventure and, after this summer of half-baked and instantly forgettable ‘blockbusters’, exactly what we need to get our blood flowing again.

4 out of 5
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 9:54 pm

http://www.starpulse.com/news/Evan_Crean/2010/08/23/trailer_talk_this_week_in_movies_take

CENTURION

Roman soldiers led by Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender) attack an enemy camp in an effort to save their captured general (Dominic West). Doing this however, attracts the attention of the Picts, the Roman Empire’s most formidable enemy. With the Picts stalking them, the soldiers’ only hope of survival is a tracker (Olga Kurylenko) bent on revenge.

Known best for his entries in the horror genre “Doomsday” and “The Descent,” Neil Marshall takes things back to the dark ages, directing and writing this action epic.

WHO SHOULD SEE IT: Audiences that dig underdogs using nothing but their bravery and cunning to survive are the type that should see this film. If you enjoy the epic battles in films like “300” and “Gladiator” then you should check out “Centurion.”
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:01 pm

http://movieonline12.blogspot.com/2010/08/online-watch-centurion-movie-online.html

Michael Fassbender (“Inglourious Basterds”) stars as Quintus Dias, our narrator and Roman Centurion who is on the run from Pict barbarians when we first meet him. Dias eventually runs across friendlies among the Ninth Legion led by General Virilus (a impressively bulked up Dominic West, “300”), whose army is on the march into Pict territory on orders from Rome. It is the latest move by the civilized Romans to conquer the barbarian Picts, a bothersome race of hut-living primitives that don’t cotton much to Roman subjugation. (Insert your personal political/war allegories here.) Virilus is guided behind enemy lines by the mute scout Etain (Olga Kurylenko, “Quantum of Solace”), who quickly reveals her true Pict loyalties by leading the Ninth into a bloody ambush that leaves the Romans all but obliterated. (Don’t get your panties into a bunch, fanboys; Etain’s betrayal is all over the pictures, synopsis, and trailers for “Centurion”.)

There are survivors of the ambush — including Dias, Bothos (David Morrissey), Thax (JJ Field), Macros (Noel Clarke), Brick (Liam Cunningham), and a few others. After the survivors’ attempt to rescue Virilus from Pict captivity proves unsuccessful (and in fact, it just ends up pissing the Picts off even more), the remaining Romans begin their trek back to friendly lands, but that’s easier said than done. The second half of the film is one big chase movie, as the Pict King Gorlacon (Ulrich Tomsen) sends Etain and a few selected hunters after the Romans. The Third Act introduces a love interest for Dias in the form of Arianne (Imogen Poots, the kid in “28 Weeks Later”, all grown up and providing excellent eye candy), an outcast Pict woman who chooses to help the fugitive Romans. Sparks fly between Arianne and Dias. Or as much as romantic sparks are capable of flying in a NeilMarshall movie, anyway.

If you’re not familiar with the name Neil Marshall, then you’ve missed out on some excellent genre entries like the post-apocalyptic sci-fi actioner “Doomsday” and the creature horror movies “The Descent” and “Dog Soldiers”. You can now add the brutal hack and slash of “Centurion” to the list of over-the-top genre films by the British director.The film is definitely pure Marshall, and if your interest was instantly piqued when you heard “Neil Marshall gets to play with broadswords”, you won’t be the least bit disappointed with “Centurion”. There is probably a little too much CGI bloodshed for my taste, but for those accustomed to (and indeed, expects more of) the director’s odd fixation on decapitations and seemingly out-of-nowhere bodily amputations, “Centurion” has you covered in spades.

The suddenly ubiquitous Michael Fassbender (Hey, that’s Michael Fassbender!) leads the cast as Quintus Dias, though really, it could have been anyone. Characterization is not and was never NeilMarshall’s strong point, and that hasn’t changed with “Centurion”. To give you an example of how poorly Marshall handles the charactersthe Black Sea. But in northern Britain, the relentless onslaught of conquest has ground to a halt in face of the guerrilla tactics of an elusive enemy: the savage and terrifying tribes known as the Picts.

Quintus, sole survivor of a Pictish raid on a Roman frontier fort, marches north with General Virilus’ legendary Ninth Legion, under orders to wipe the Picts from the face of the earth and destroy their leader Gorlacon.

But when the legion is ambushed on unfamiliar ground, and Virilus taken captive, Quintus faces a desperate struggle to keep his small platoon alive behind enemy lines, evading remorseless Pict pursuers over harsh terrain, as the band of soldiers race to rescue their General, and to reach the safety of the Roman frontier.

From writer/director, Neil Marshall, Centurion is a gripping survival thriller set against a background of conquest and invasion; a pursuit movie in the vein of Deliverance, Last of the Mohicans and Apocalypto.

'Britain, A.D. 117. Quintus Dias, the sole survivor of a Pictish raid on a Roman frontier fort, marches north with General Virilus' legendary Ninth Legion, under orders to wipe the Picts from the face of the Earth and destroy their leader, Gorlacon.'
Plot 2
Centurion is a British film directed by Neil Marshall about the ill-fated Ninth Legion marching north to Caledonia to wipe out the Picts and their leader. Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, and Olga Kurylenko star.
Monday, August 23, 2010 // // //
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:15 pm

http://www.rowthree.com/2010/08/23/review-centurion/


Toronto After Dark: Centurion Review
23
Aug
2010
by Andrew James in Film Festivals, Reviews, Toronto After Dark 2010

Director: Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, The Descent, Doomsday)
Writer: Neil Marshall
Producers: Christian Colson, Robert Jones
Starring: Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, Olga Kurylenko, David Morrissey, Dimitri Leonidas, Noel Clarke
MPAA Rating: R
Running time: 97 min.
(4/5)
Toronto After Dark

Every Neil Marshall film seems to follow roughly the same formula: a small band of unlikelys, often led by a strong female character, must battle against the evil odds to stay alive. While many might take such a repetitive structure as a criticism, I actually find it to be a strength as long as it’s done in new or interesting ways each time. That isn’t to say that Centurion does anything all that new or inventive but Marshall seems to excel at making things fresh and fun with each of his outings with a great flair for style, gorgeous scenery and exciting action sequences (i.e. cool kills).

Essentially nothing more than an on-foot chase movie, a small band of Roman Soldiers struggle desperately to get in front of enemy lines while being mercilessly hunted by a barbaric group of warriors from Northern England known as the Picts. Angry for crimes against their people, The Picts have sworn revenge and death to the Roman Soldiers and have sent out their bravest and most ruthless hunter/tracker (Olga Kurylenko) to bring back their heads. A race across the gorgeous country side ensues with harsh environments, wild animals, unknown strangers and each others’ pride or lust for power almost making the savage hunters the least of their worries.

What you’re in for in terms of visual style is exemplified immediately with some fantastic, sweeping opening credits that really open up the frame and give a sense of the environment we’ll be spending most of the story with. As a huge fan of Christophe Gans’ Brotherhood of the Wolf, almost exclusively for the visual environment and aesthetics, Centurion comes really close to bringing that style back as Marshall makes sure to take full advantage of his location with just amazing set up shots of the English countryside and its various and changing weather patterns. Quite honestly, these shots alone were enough to make me love the film… but there was so much more.

Now unlike other Marshall films, as unlikely as it might seem, it feels like this movie actually has some things to say. They may not be all that deep or new, but injecting some sort of sense of intelligence into this story really helps flesh out the characters and actually gives the audience something to feel rather than just watch a series of battles and decapitations. The most interesting thing about Centurion is how we relate to the two main groups of characters. We never really know who we’re supposed to be rooting for. On the surface, or at first glance it might feel or seem obvious that the Romans are our protagonists, but these guys do some pretty despicable stuff and quite honestly deserve the devil’s due. Meanwhile, The Picts seem pretty blood-thirsty themselves and it’s hard not to pull for the guys just trying to get home to their families – even though they’re simply a bunch of guys from an invading outfit that shouldn’t even be there in the first place.

This dynamic of these two factions does two things that make this movie awesome. First, it makes the story completely unpredictable as to who will be victorious and which company will make it back to their respective camp alive. Sure there are bits here and there that you can see coming a mile away, but the overall story arc is hard to predict and the back and forth in my head as to who I’m pulling for and what I think is going to happen, with really no clue, was a big part of the fun here. Secondly, I can’t help but wonder if this is loosely allegorical to the allies’ occupation of the middle east. We’re cheering for “our guys” but know that they’re doing some pretty detestable things in the name of their Gods and are really just invading a land that they have no business being in at all. Maybe this is looking into it too deeply and maybe that isn’t even a valid comparison (it especially might depend on your political viewpoint) or even relevant to the enjoyment of the movie, but it seems like sort of an obvious parallel.

Some of this minutiae is dived into with details that subtly examine the justification (or lack thereof) for war and how all of these characters perceive their roles in this conflict. A quick scene of The Picts preparing for the hunt looks typical and nothing that we’ve not seen a hundred times before (applying face paint, sharpening their blades, etc.), but underneath all of that cliché is an explanation into why they must hunt these men and their motivations as to why they’re willing to go as far as they do in succeeding with their “mission.” These expository moments don’t feel forced, unnecessary or typical at all. Rather, they really seem to flesh out the whys of what we’re seeing and experiencing rather than just a typical bloody, revenge, action picture.

Like Doomsday before it, while Centurion is mostly on screen for us to have fun with and munch on popcorn, it does take itself seriously enough to make the visual details worth looking out for. Set pieces and props are rather typical (which isn’t to say they aren’t awesome) for this type of “Braveheart-esque”, period piece but the costuming is really amazing and detailed as well, which make the characters that much more fun to hang out with. From the grander capes and armoring of the Roman Soldiers to the wicked, etched in detail of a Pict’s leather cuff, all of this stuff just makes the visual treat on screen that much sweeter. The muggy, dirty, smelly and downright dinginess feel of the communities in this world is palpable and along with the aforementioned set up shots of the landscape, it’s hard not to feel sucked into this desolate world that Marshall somehow makes breathe and come alive.

After all that though, this movie succeeds by just having a blast with itself. Typical battle sequences are laced with interesting camera angles and awesomely inventive kill shots. Sure the CGI blood can be annoying at first but after just a little while it’s not quite as noticeable or the viewer just gets used to it. It could also be argued that the CGI look of the blood is fully intentional to add a little bit to the “comicy” feel to the movie and add a certain amount of aesthetic contrast in this world of mostly earthy tones in the cinematography. For the fact that this movie seems so typical and obvious on the surface and yet it transcends cliché by making everything breathe so arrestingly well; from characters to sets and from costuming to performances to simple yet neat camera tricks this is one of the better period, action pieces we’ve gotten in a long time and further solidifies Neil Marshall as a master of what he does: entertain like hell!
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:18 pm

http://tupac_shakur.blogspot.com/2010/08/review-centurion.html

Monday, August 23, 2010
Review : Centurion

Director:
Neil Marshall (Doomsday)

Genre : Action / Drama

Main Attractions:
Michael Fassbender
Olga Kurylenko

IMDB Synopsis:
Quintus Dias (Fassbender), sole survivor of a Pictish raid on a Roman frontier fort, marches north with General Virilus' (West) legendary Ninth Legion, under orders to wipe the Picts from the face of the earth and destroy their leader Gorlacon. But when the legion is ambushed on unfamiliar ground, and Virilus taken captive, Quintus faces a desperate struggle to keep his small platoon alive behind enemy lines. Enduring the harsh terrain and evading their remorseless Pict pursuers led by revenge-hungry Pict Warrior Etain (Kurylenko), the band of soldiers race to rescue their General and to reach the safety of the Roman frontier.

My Take:
I’m not really fond of good Romans but they make them look quite pathetic as compared to the Picts. Good enough story but the thing that kept me going was the amount of blood spilled and the carnage. Kurylenko was alright but not as hot as the tribal version of Keira Knightley in King Arthur.

Something Like:
King Arthur

Final Verdict:
Bloody enough
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:29 pm

http://www.overentertained.com/2010/08/23/do-you-like-gladiator-movies/

{ 2010 08 23 }
Do You Like Gladiator Movies?

Okay, so Centurion isn’t technically a gladiator movie. Instead, it’s about the fabled Ninth Legion. One of the more enduring (probably apocryphal) tales about the Ninth is that they all went missing in Northern England shortly before the building of Hadrian’s Wall. Centurion wants to tell the story of what happened to that Legion.

In many ways, Centurion is a lot like director Neil Marshall’s previous film, Doomsday. Like that film, the plot involves a bad-ass group heading into the wild untamed realm of Northern England. Like that film, most of the group is wiped out and much of the film revolves around the survivors attempting to escape their savage pursuers, and like that film, Centurion is very content to play in its genre rather than trying to reinvent anything.

Both Doomsday and Centurion also end up being very entertaining pieces of genre fare. Rather than trying to re-imagine the men-on-the-run genre or the Roman legion setting, Marshall just straight up runs with it and produces a simple but very well told story. The plot is dispatched with fairly quickly: the Legion is sent to the North to deal with the troublesome Picts. They’re joined on their march by a Roman soldier who we saw escape from the Pict’s prison. They’re ambushed, their General is taken hostage, and the escaped Roman soldier and a few extra men are left to try and rescue the General and get back to civilization before being hunted down.

One thing that helps the film immensely is a pretty damn good cast. This isn’t the sort of film that’s going to be stacked with big names, so Marshall fills it with less known but very talented actors. Michael Fassbender, who was spectacular in Hunger, is the titular Centurion tasked with trying to track down the captured general. Dominic West (The Wire) is the general, and Irish actor Liam Cunningham plays another of the surviving soldiers. There’s nothing big about these roles, and in general we know the paths these characters will take from the outset of the movie, but the actors are good enough, and given enough to do, that we care about the outcome. Of special note is Olga Kurylenko, the most recent “Bond girl”. Marshall makes her a mute tracker, and by removing her tongue, the movie makes her more feral, more vicious, and more dangerous that she could possibly have been while delivering lines.

There are plenty of battle scenes, and they’re well staged. There’s bloodletting aplenty, and the film is definitely quite violent. If you’re looking for gore, you’ll find it, but I never felt like the violence was gratuitous, because it fits in with the period and weaponry. When people attack other people with swords and pikes, you pretty much have to expect some fairly extreme violence. In the end, the film basically offers a hundred minutes or so of Picts and Romans fighting or Picts chasing Romans through the woods, but they’re an entertaining hundred minutes. Centurion is a reminder that films don’t have to be novel to be good. Sometimes it’s enough to just be well made pieces of entertainment.

7/10
Postscript: Centurion is being played on many VOD services in HD prior to its release in theaters. I watched it via Amazon, and found it to be quite a good experience. It’s expensive ($10), but cheaper than a trip to the movies. I wouldn’t make this my choice for all films, but it’s not a bad option, especially for movies like this where getting my girlfriend to see it is incredibly unlikely.
Posted by pnicholson on Monday, August 23, 2010, at 8:56 am.
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:39 pm

http://flickeringmyth.blogspot.com/2010/08/british-cinema-centurion-2010.html

Monday, 23 August 2010
British Cinema: Centurion (2010)
Centurion, 2010

Directed by Neil Marshall
Starring Michael Fassbender, Dominic West, Olga Kurylenko, Noel Clarke, David Morrissey and Imogen Poots


SYNOPSIS:

When the legendary Ninth Legion of the Roman army are decimated by a tribe of Pictish warriors, a small band of survivors must fight for survival deep behind enemy lines.


The fourth feature from Geordie director Neil Marshall (The Descent), Centurion is a low-budget historical epic that has been described as "Britain's answer to Gladiator", and while it's easy to draw comparisons with Ridley Scott's Oscar-winning blockbuster, it is fairly safe to assume that the film won't be troubling the Academy members come voting time. That's not to say Centurion is a bad film by any means but story is clearly a secondary concern next to bone-crunching action and blood-soaked gore, which is a shame when you consider the array of acting talent on display. However, as fans of the director's previous work will know, bone-crunching action and blood-soaked gore is what Marshall does best and he is certainly on top of his game with this latest release.

In AD 117, the Roman Empire dominates much of the civilised world but in northern Britain the might of the military has ground to a halt in the face of a new enemy, a savage Celtic tribe known as the Picts. Under the leadership of Gorlacon (Ulrich Thomsen), the Picts are perfecting their guerrilla tactics and eliminating Roman outposts one at a time, much to the displeasure of Agricola (Paul Freeman), the governor of Britannia. After surviving a Pict raid on a frontier garrison, centurion Quintus Dias (Michael Fassbender) is rescued by General Virilus (Dominic West) and his battle-hardened Ninth Legion. Summoned by the governor, Virilus and Quintus are tasked with marching north into Caledonia to kill Gorlacon and eliminate his people.

Accompanied by a Etain (Olga Kurylenko), a mute Pict scout and ferocious warrior, the legion head deep into the harsh terrain of the Scottish Highlands only to be betrayed by their guide. Ambushed by the Picts, General Virilus is taken prisoner and all but a handful of the soldiers are brutally slain. When a failed rescue attempt results in the death of Gorlacon's young son, the Pict chief dispatches Etain and a selection of his most fierce warriors to hunt the soldiers down, with Quintus and his dwindling platoon facing a desperate battle for survival as they look to reach the sanctuary of the Roman frontier.

Running at just 97 minutes, Centurion moves at a frantic pace and there are more than enough intense battle sequences and grisly deaths to satisfy even the most hardcore of viewer. The film might be rated 15 in the UK but don’t let that fool you into thinking the violence is restrained by any stretch of the imagination. While I found the inclusion of some rather iffy CGI-blood to be a tad distracting and unnecessary at times, the majority seemed to be of the old-school practical variety and the red-stuff really does flow by the bucket-load as limbs fly and heads roll at every turn.

Another of the director's strengths is his knack for maximising his budget and delivering a Hollywood-style polish on a fraction of the cost. Made for just £10m, Centurion manages to match the stylish visual flair of its big budget counterparts and cinematographer Sam McCurdy makes excellent use of its picturesque locations, with some fantastic sweeping helicopter shots that would not look out of place in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Having realised such a polished look for a relatively small cost, it is intriguing to think of what could be achieved with the backing of a major Hollywood studio and it is surely just a matter of time before Marshall tries has hand on the other side of the Atlantic.

Marshall always brings something different to the typical high-profile output of the British film industry Centurion is no exception. For those who have enjoyed his previous work it’s a no-brainer and a fine return to form after the underwhelming Doomsday (2008), and if you’re the type of person who favours hyper-realistic gory action over historical accuracy you're bound to be entertained by the brutal mayhem on offer here.

Gary Collinson
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Re: Centurion reviews

Post by Admin on Tue Aug 24, 2010 1:59 am

http://www.jaredmobarak.com/2010/08/23/centurion/

REVIEW: Centurion

0 Comments 23 August 2010

“A man without his word is no better than a beast”

Writer/director Neil Marshall has style and hopefully will continue to bring it forth on cinema screens for years to come, if he decides to travel back to America or not. Many lesser auteurs would have taken that Hollywood payday and looked for another to follow. Marshall, however, hot on the success of his spelunking horror/thriller The Descent, made Doomsday with US money only to see it falter out of the starting gate. Perhaps he had deals to remain stateside, but instead found himself back home in the UK to craft his war epic of Northern English history. Going back to 117 AD, Centurion relays the tale of the lost Roman Ninth Legion—the last ditch attempt by the great empire to oust guerilla Picts from England. With no survivors to tell the tale, Marshall’s film recalls a similar work of unknown bloodshed in 300, more portraying the heroism and courage of these men fighting for their land, for their general, and for their freedom than the facts.

A lot goes on during the first half of the movie, starting with an introduction to Michael Fassbender’s titular Centurion, Quintus Dias, as our narrator, it being neither the beginning of his story, nor the end. Second in command of his Roman force, his men are massacred mercilessly—Marshall never afraid to show exploding heads, pierced limbs, blood covered roads, or shrieking screams of pain and death—his survival only earned due to his ability to speak the Pict language. Brought back to their king, Ulrich Thomsen’s farmer turned murderer Gorlacon, the Centurion is cut and beaten, tortured to learn the whereabouts of his superiors and their next moves. Refusing to betray his empire as he bleeds in front of the king’s son, showing the young boy the face of his enemy, Dias soon finds escape, running through the snowy, mountainous expanse, captors on his trail and running towards a newly dispatched regime of Romans looking to take control of England once and for all.

These new men are the Ninth Legion, led by Dominic West’s General Titus Virilus, a man with the respect and kinship of his men. Volatile, unpredictable, and never afraid to partake in a drunken brawl or two while between missions, Virilus tells his superior, Governor Agricola (Paul Freeman), that he won’t send his men on a death march into a fight he cannot win. One mention of insubordination and treason for ignoring a direct order changes his tune, and they set off with a Pict guide to lead the charge. Tongue-less Etain (Olga Kurylenko) is equal parts beauty and warrior; never afraid to let the men around her know her formidability. She is the one who leads them onto the path of Dias and his pursuers, allowing Virilus to save the gladiator and befriend him as a second in command, the Centurion’s father an idol of his after having seeing the man fight for freedom years before. Joining forces, the Romans trek on while Etain disappears into the fog, carefully treading behind her until the snap of a tree cracks through the sky, the fallen trunk trapping them in the valley, unable to do anything but wait for their enemy.

And boy do they make an entrance. Throughout this 97-minute opus of carnage, sharp cuts clumsily transition, causing the audience to lose their bearings ever so slightly, making you wonder at the fact this film ran a full thirty minutes longer when screened in Finland. But if anything was saved from the cutting room floor, it was the frenetic fight sequences of kill after kill and the precursors to each sparring session. When the Picts have the Ninth Legion ripe for destruction, Marshall does well to make us feel the trepidation and suspense, hearing the officers scream, “Keep watching”, as they all look up the mist-shrouded hills, awaiting the giant fireballs soon to roll down and break their lines. We see each and every one hit the Romans, pushing them off-balance, just in time for the savages to pounce and the metal to clang into the sky. There are no extended man-to-man interludes; it is all just one long kinetically cut sequence of killshot after killshot. One sword impales an adversary and another does him. Blood flies and heads roll until Virilus is taken and Dias is knocked into a ditch, piled over by his lifeless comrades.

All this and the film is only halfway complete. The rest of the quest sees Fassbender’s tentative leader take on the best soldiers he has ever laid eyes upon, unsure if he is worthy to be their general. Reduced to a small band of about six fighters and one cook—Riz Ahmed’s Tarak is quite deft with his cleaver, however—they now must go on the run, trying what they can to find home as Etain’s true allegiances are uncovered, Gorlacon sending her to track them so as to leave no Roman alive. It becomes a cat and mouse chase through the woods and rocky cliff faces, the men looking to get behind the Picts and find sanctuary. It seems as though the Roman leadership have decided to change plans after learning of the Ninth’s defeat, though, recalling men and for all intents and purposes leaving England for good. Dias and his men are now caught behind enemy lines without help, the odds stacked against them for survival.

The final half gets the adrenaline pumping just as much as the first and for once a movie shows that no matter how big the actor’s name or how high his character’s rank, every single man on the battlefield is at risk to meet his maker. Marshall is unyielding in his depiction of the carnage and rightfully juxtaposes the brutality with the majestic landscapes of Northern England’s snow-covered hills. With plenty of longshots, you begin to feel the scope and distance of what is laid out before these men. Running on foot with little sustenance to sustain them, they carry on. West, Fassbender, David Morrissey’s Bothos and Liam Cunningham’s Brick show the mettle needed to survive with insurmountable forces to overcome, each with moments of humor to temper the severe attitude their warriors possess. Kurylenko becomes a bit of a one-note vessel of evil, but that is her job and it’s handled expertly; as is the lone source of hope on an otherwise blood-soaked trajectory in Pict witch Arianne, played by Imogen Poots. Each character fires true and hits his/her mark—whether this is Marshall’s true version or a cut down one on behalf of the producers—delivering a highly enjoyable experience.

Centurion 7/10
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