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WE CONTINUE TO SUPPORT MICHAEL-AN AWARD WINNING ACTOR

Congratulations to the cast and crew of "12 Years a Slave" winning an Oscar for Best Picture

Michael is currently filming "MacBeth"

Watch "12 Years A Slave" and "Frank" in theaters

Watch "The Counselor" and "12 Years A Slave" on DVD available now

Michael is set to star and produce on a film version of the video game "Assassin's Creed"

Completed projects: X-Men, Untitled Malik project

Upcoming projects Assassin's Creed, Prometheus 2, MacBeth,and more!

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ELLE interivew: Michael Fassbender

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ELLE interivew: Michael Fassbender

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 26, 2014 3:43 pm

http://www.elle.com.au/pop-culture/elle-interview/2014/2/elle-interview-michael-fassbender/

Feb 26, 2014
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He's so good at being bad - now his latest villainous turn, opposite Brad Pitt, has earned major awards buzz. Michele Manelis sits down with the indie-darling-turned-a-lister

It’s a sticky afternoon in New York, at the tail end of a hot summer. There’s a film of sweat on Michael Fassbender’s brow when he opens the door to his hotel suite and the first thing he does is ask me, in his soft Irish accent: “Would you like some water?” Without waiting for an answer, he opens the mini bar, removes two bottles of Evian and hands one to me before plonking himself down on the sofa, flashing his dazzling smile and intense blue eyes in my direction.

For an actor who’s built a reputation as Hollywood’s reigning bad guy, the 36-year-old German-born, Irish-raised actor is disarmingly pleasant. But, then again, he is what Hollywood directors call a “true chameleon”, morphing into each and every role with such alarming authenticity that he’s barely recognisable. Whether it calls for the moral emptiness of a sex addict (for 2011’s Shame, in which he spent most of the film naked) or the psychopathy of a ruthless android (Prometheus, 2011), Fassbender does it – and does it well – gaining critical acclaim for blending roles in boundary-pushing indie films like Hunger (2008) and Shame with big-budget movies, such as Inglourious Basterds (2009), Jane Eyre (2011), X Men: First Class (2011), Prometheus and, last year, The Counselor, opposite Cameron Diaz and Javier Bardem.

But it’s his turn as a heartless slave owner in drama 12 Years A Slave that represents Fassbender’s most striking effort yet.

Set in America’s Deep South in the 1800s, 12 Years A Slave tells the true story of Solomon Northup, a free man who was captured and forced into slavery. The film’s all-star cast includes Brad Pitt, Paul Giamatti, Benedict Cumberbatch and Paul Dano, yet Fassbender steals each scene as the villain by bringing humanity to a character who commits unspeakably evil acts.

As it hits screens in Australia (with buzz surrounding Fassbender’s portrayal reaching fever pitch), he opens up on superstitions, fame and being a sex symbol.

12 Years a Slave is a brilliant piece of work but brutal to watch. Was it depressing to immerse yourself in such difficult material?

A lot of the preparation was technical, like getting the Louisiana accent right, but the heavy scenes were upsetting. We were filming on plantations where horrific events took place and you could almost feel the spirits around you. I felt an awful sense of obligation towards them to do it right and do it justice, so those realities overrode any despondency.

Did you see any ghosts?

New Orleans, where it was filmed, is famous for them. I did have this experience where a bird flew into my apartment and I was like, “God!” Because isn’t that an omen of some sort, if a bird flies in? It is, apparently. I checked the internet and I think that means somebody close to me is going to die.

No, that’s only if it’s a crow…

Oh, OK. Good. It wasn’t a crow.

Five minutes ago nobody had heard of you and now, you’re everywhere. Has overnight fame been weird to adjust to?

Very. I did feel, when I’d finished Prometheus and done a string of films back-to-back, that they were all coming out and my face was everywhere. My friends were like, “We’re sick of seeing you,” so I thought maybe it was time to back off for a while. But some opportunities are too good to miss out on and this [12 Years A Slave] was one of them.

And now you find yourself starring in one of the most buzzed-about films of the year...

My priorities in life are such that I couldn’t ask to be in a better position than the one I’m in right now. When I started off [in acting], at age 17 or 18, the idea that I would be in this position was beyond my wildest dreams. I know that this film is beautiful and it’s having an effect on people, which is amazing. Anything else that comes after that is a bonus.

Are you mobbed by fans these days or can you still go about your business undisturbed?

The odd person may recognise me but I can pretty much go about my business without much interruption. I came to the table a little bit later and my fan base, perhaps, is not so steeped in the teenage market, which is the most – how do I put this – enthusiastic! Like what Robert Pattinson goes through because of Twilight, now that’s a different deal.

You haven’t played the typical romantic lead that lends itself to sex symbol status, yet you’ve become one. How did that happen?

What about in Jane Eyre [he played Edward Rochester]? I guess he’s a dodgy dude… he was locking his wife in the attic. I think I’m just comfortable in my own skin, as much as one can be. I don’t mind projecting myself onto these characters because I don’t mind going to ugly places and showing ugly elements of myself or the character’s humanity, whatever it be, and maybe that’s the thing… I know that I find women who are comfortable in their own skin attractive. Maybe that’s something to do with it. For me, the sex symbol stuff seems kind of outrageous and ridiculous but it’s OK, I welcome it [laughs].

You rocked full-frontal nudity in Shame but, when the occasion calls for clothing, do you like getting dressed up?

I do, but then I like getting dressed down as well – when you’ve been doing a lot of functions and you’re wearing a suit a lot, it’s nice to get into some tracksuit bottoms and T-shirt and mooch around. I’m pretty fashion ignorant but I like Armani a lot.
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