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Jane Eyre actors

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Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Mon May 17, 2010 5:15 pm

http://www.movieline.com/2010/05/the-verge-imogen-poots.php

The Verge
The Verge: Imogen Poots

Written by Kyle Buchanan | 17 May 2010, 9:30 AM

There’s a bit of cognitive dissonance that happens when you watch Imogen Poots in Solitary Man: she’s utterly convincing as a confident Manhattan teenager who sexually entangles herself with the boyfriend (Michael Douglas) of her wealthy mother (Mary-Louise Parker), but with a name like “Imogen Poots,” there’s no way she’s actually American. In fact, the 20-year-old Poots is British and, until now, best known for playing one of the young leads in 28 Weeks Later. That should change after the one-two-three punch Poots has coming in Solitary Man, the Cannes drama Chatroom, and the Cary Fukunaga-directed Jane Eyre, where she plays rival to Mia Wasikowska.

As Solitary Man sees release this week, Poots called up Movieline to discuss the sitcom that helped her with an American accent, the perils of technology, and the pleasures of working twice opposite Michael Fassbender.

<snipped>

Well, that yen for pen and parchment probably served you well for Cary Fukunaga’s remake of Jane Eyre.

Yes, we just finished. I had a wonderful time, gallivanting around hills in bonnets.

You’re playing Blanche Ingram. That character is not exactly beloved in the book. What’s she like in the movie?

In the book, I think she comes across as quite conniving, but what we wanted to do was a different feel. We kind of played her as seriously flabbergasted that Rochester isn’t going to marry her. We don’t want Blanche Ingram to be the kind of stereotypical rival — she’s just really confused as to how it all turns out.

You have to sing 1830s operetta in this movie, don’t you?

I did! How horrendous is that? I’ve been an alto my whole life, so that was a challenge, but I enjoyed it because Cary, the director, handled it with a lot of humor. Michael Fassbender and I have to do this duet together, which was the bane of our lives, but we had a wonderful singing teacher who helped us through it.

So what was Cary’s approach like?

After Sin Nombre, I’m really curious as to what he would do with this material that hasn’t been done in other adaptations of Jane Eyre. I think it’s much younger, especially with the cast. You have Mia Wasikowska as Jane and Michael Fassbender as Rochester. It’s kind of a new Jane Eyre for a new generation. Of course, it’s still very sinister, but I think he’ll be bringing that visual aspect from Sin Nombre to Jane Eyre.

And this is your second film opposite Michael Fassbender, isn’t it?

Yes, it is. We did one together called Centurion, and this is our second. It was lovely to see a familiar face. He’s such a kind man, so it was a pleasure to be able to work with him again.
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Thu May 20, 2010 4:15 pm

http://mag.brink.com/content/10885

Imogen Poots, Solitary Woman
BY
DANNY PEARY

You may not know the British actress with the very strange name of Imogen Poots, unless you remember her as the endangered teenager in the cult horror film, 28 Weeks Later. But you will. As she moves from supporting roles to leads, I'm predicting she'll be the next Keira Knightley.

<snipped>

Q: You've already made some interesting choices in your career. Can you talk about being in Jane Eyre?
IP: Sure: That's a bit different from Solitary Man. It was directed by Cary Fukunaga, who made Sin nombre. So it's an interesting choice by him to take on something quintessentially English. I think Cary wanted the whole feel of the film to be young. He definitely did that with Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska as Jane. Cary himself is young, so there's definitely this youthful energy to the film. It was a great experience filming in Devonshire, in the beautiful English countryside, and it was great to be part of something that is a British legacy. I rode horses for about three weeks and ended up being attached by a leash to Michael Fassbender's horse. That was slightly embarrassing. For him, too, because he wanted to be a real man galloping away, but he couldn't because he had me.
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Sat Dec 11, 2010 12:58 am

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/imogen-poots--a-blooming-english-rose-2155549.html

Imogen Poots - A blooming English Rose

At 21, Imogen Poots is already an old hand at period dramas and she's just shared her first on-screen kiss with Michael Douglas. James Mottram meets a rising star

Friday, 10 December 2010

With a CV that already includes the BBC costume-drama Miss Austen Regrets and a forthcoming film version of Jane Eyre, Imogen Poots is well aware that she's at a tricky stage in her development. She may be just 21, but after six years in the business, she knows full well that the fate of being imprisoned in corsets for the rest of her career is a very real possibility. "It's a difficult one," she muses, over coffee in a hotel restaurant. "You definitely have to be aware of not prancing around in fields wearing bonnets forever."

Today, there's not a bonnet in sight, with a chic-looking Poots dressed in jeans, a black cardigan, beige flats and a matching raincoat. Still, it's not hard to see why casting directors have targeted her for period pieces. She has the English Rose look down pat: pale skin, petite features, blue eyes and curls of long blonde hair (today clamped to her head with Ray-Bans). Of course, she doesn't see herself this way, telling me that someone once said she resembled a Moomin, the white hippo-like cartoon creature created by Tove Jansson. "I do look like a Moomin, with this nose!" she giggles.

While that might be stretching the self-deprecation a little too far, she's evidently keen to avoid being shackled with the English Rose image. When she was just 17 and still at school, she became known for playing Robert Carlyle's daughter in 28 Weeks Later. But much of her work is firmly anchored in the past, whether it be Jordan Scott's boarding-school tale Cracks or Richard Linklater's Me and Orson Welles.
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So there's a sense of relief in Poots's voice when we move onto her new film Chatroom, an adaptation of the play by Enda Walsh. Set in the murky world of internet chatrooms, it follows a group of five pasty-faced British teenagers (led by Kick-Ass star Aaron Johnson) as they meet online and begin to encourage antisocial behaviour in each other. While each teen is logged on at home, the film visualises the web as a physical set of rooms – all connected by a Dante-inspired corridor of hellish debauchery – in which the characters come face-to-face. Poots plays Eva, one of those whom Johnson's cocky William manipulates.

"It's so relevant to now," enthuses Poots. "It's great to be involved with something that represents my generation." Yet the problem with the film, as the critic on film and culture site The House Next Door pointed out when the film made its debut in Cannes earlier this year, is that "no teenager has used a chatroom since approximately 1997".

Even Poots seems aware of this. "I didn't go on chatrooms. Just Facebook," she says, admitting she joined the social networking site for a while. Poots calls herself "inept" when it comes to technology. She has a BlackBerry to "keep track of emails" and only seems dimly aware of Amazon's Kindle book-reader. "Why would you choose to do that instead of going to a book store and buying a novel?" she asks. "It's crazy."

If anything makes Chatroom relevant to today's social networking craze, it's how people are willing to reinvent themselves online. "It's extraordinary how people present themselves. They can say things they want and transcend their own personalities and dismiss their own identity," she says, calling the internet "intrusive" for the way it exposes individuals. "No matter what you say, you're still contributing to, 'look at me, look how cool my life is.' It's interesting to see just the photos people put up. What are they trying to achieve?"

How does she feel being in an industry that in its own way is as exposing as the internet? "I think there are ways to be discreet," she says. "I think going into the industry, you are putting yourself out there to an extent."

As the daughter of two journalists – her Belfast-born father, Trevor Poots, worked with Sir David Frost, most recently on BBC4's Frost on Satire – Poots presumably has an innate understanding of the way the media operates. But after a private West London education, which concluded at Latymer Upper School, where she gained 3 As at A-level, she never had a desire to follow into the family business. "Once I started acting, I loved it so much," she says. "It seemed crazy to just dismiss something like that."

Thankfully, Poots wasn't one of those annoying stage children who took any opportunity to perform in front of their parents. "Oh God, that's the worst thing ever," she groans. While she eventually enrolled in an impro workshop when she was 14, acting wasn't initially on her radar. "I wanted to be a vet at one point, then I fainted when a cat had its gall-bladder stones removed on my work-experience day. My mum made my packed lunch and said, 'have fun!' Then she came back to collect me and I was all limp and being dragged out of the surgery."

Even now, Poots still toys with the idea of returning to formal education. She has a place on hold at London's Courtauld Institute of Art. "They're being very sympathetic and I've deferred it for a couple of years," she says. "If you want to know about the Scrovegni Chapel, you can read a book on it. But if you really want to know about it, and everything leading up to and after those Giotto frescos, then do the degree". It's hard to see Poots finding time to take the course on.

She has already appeared in Solitary Man, in which she plays an impressionable youngster who winds up having an affair with Michael Douglas's down-on-his-luck car dealer. While the film went straight to DVD in the UK, trade-paper Variety has just cited Douglas as a Best Actor contender for the forthcoming Oscars. Creepy though it sounds, Poots even shared her first on-screen kiss with the actor (45 years her senior). "We filmed it in a penthouse in New York, and I remember looking out the window," she says, wistfully recalling the Manhattan skyline. "But I felt very calm, because he was so calm. And really caring."

She has just completed a second major Hollywood outing, snagging the lead in a remake of the 1985 comedy-horror Fright Night, in which she'll star opposite Colin Farrell. Yet all eyes will more likely be on a home-grown production, a new version of Charlotte Brontë's classic, Jane Eyre. Directed by Cary Fukunaga, who made the well-regarded US-Mexican gang-thriller Sin Nombre, it stars Michael Fassbender as Rochester and Alice in Wonderland's Mia Wasikowska as Jane. Poots plays Blanche Ingram, the avaricious socialite Rochester courts to enrage Jane with jealousy.

"Obviously, in the book she's presented as pretty conniving and is extremely hostile towards Jane," explains Poots. "But I think Cary wanted to give her a fresh image. And the way that we've explored her character is by presenting her as someone quite innocent and generally flabbergasted as to why this man doesn't want to marry her. Also Cary has made it much younger, having Michael Fassbender and Mia Wasikowska as the two leads. And it's much more sinister than any other adaptation."

Alongside Jane Eyre, Poots has already filmed Christopher and His Kind, yet another period piece – this time about author Christopher Isherwood. She features as Jean Ross, the inspiration for Sally Bowles in his novella Goodbye to Berlin (who gained screen notoriety in Cabaret). Still, having worked with Aaron Johnson on Chatroom, it's clear she has a hankering to try her hand at an action movie. "Look at something like Iron Man 2 – Scarlett Johansson is brilliant," she says. "As long as you keep evolving as an actor, that's the key." Too true: it' the only way an English rose can flower.

'Chatroom' opens on 24 December
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:33 am

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2011-02-11-jamiebell11_st_N.htm

Jamie Bell's career makes strides, years after 'Billy Elliot'
By Nancy Mills Special for USA TODAY

Jamie Bell recalls how surreal it was to be a young teenager in Hollywood.

* No shirt, no sandals, no service: Jamie Bell, who co-stars in the Roman-themed film The Eagle, has come a long way since Billy Elliot catapulted him to fame.

By Matt Nettheim, AP

"Imagine me at 14," Bell says, gazing across his Beverly Hills hotel suite and visualizing an earlier version of himself.

This younger Bell had just made his debut in 2000 to great acclaim in Billy Elliot, a coming-of-age story about a ballet dancer. Now, he is nearly 25 and is starring in The Eagle, opening today. But he can't get that teenager out of his head.

"I'd just done the (Golden) Globes and was looking forward to the Oscars and hanging out with all these people and being told I was so great," he remembers. "I didn't go off the rails and start doing a bunch of drugs. But definitely I lost touch with who I was."

But it didn't take long for him to find himself again. "The reality kicked in a few days later," he says. "I was back in math class (in his tiny hometown of Billingham, England), and I thought to myself, 'Hold on a second. I did this film to get me out of this place, and now I'm right back here.' "

Bell's newfound fame didn't cut any ice with his classmates, who suddenly found him odd. "Imagine," he continues, still staring across the room, "the guy next to you in math class has just been to the Academy Awards, and Russell Crowe mentioned him in his (Oscar acceptance) speech (for Gladiator). That's a bit weird."

At the behest of his mother, Eileen, Bell stayed in school for two more years, did well in his exams and then returned to acting. "If I'd actually been nominated for an Oscar, my life would have been ruined," he says. "Where do you go from there? Down, down, down. When I see these young people getting nominated, it's great, of course. But I hope that they always have that person who goes, 'Check yourself. Be careful.' "

Bell seemingly has been careful. Eight years and a dozen films later, he has a house he bought in Los Angeles. He avoids activities that would interest gossip columnists. His only famous girlfriend has been actress Evan Rachel Wood. They dated for about a year after meeting in 2005 while making a music video for Green Day's Wake Me Up When September Ends.

"I'm a homebody," Bell says. "I like to rattle around the house and walk the dog. I cook a lot but the same things over and over — steak au poivre, lamb chops and a great flat-roasted chicken."

Ultimately, though, Bell is not home that much. Since Billy Elliot launched him as an actor, he has spent recent years traveling around the world making such films as King Kong, Flags of Our Fathers, Jumperand Defiance.

For The Eagle, which is set in second-century Britain, he spent time galloping across the Scottish Highlands, swimming in icy streams and protecting his master, a Roman soldier (Channing Tatum) on a quest. The soldier is searching for the golden emblem of Rome's Ninth Legion, along with knowledge about what happened to the missing 5,000 soldiers.

"When you read a script and it takes you on a journey, you completely forget that it all takes place outside and it's freezing cold, and there's lots of water and lots of horses." Bell says the logical question is "Why have I made this hard for myself?"

And the answer is: the sense of accomplishment. He explains, "I was petrified — not of the horses but of what they might do to me — their unpredictability. Are they going to throw me off their backs? I actually conquered that fear. I'd never ridden a horse before, but if you just gallop and keep galloping, eventually you forget you're riding a horse — unless you fall off."

Bell found that his years of dance training came in handy for the many action sequences. "I'm pretty good at anything physical," he says, "and that means I don't have to think about what I'm doing. It's second nature."

The Eagle is a buddy picture of sorts, although Bell and Tatum don't start out as equals. The story, which is based on Rosemary Sutcliff's best-selling novel The Eagle of the Ninth, is about honor, friendship and trust.

"This film reminded me of The Defiant Ones, which is a favorite movie of mine," Bell says. "These two people are on a journey together, and they're the complete antithesis of one another. By the end, they learn something about themselves and in fact, your best mate is your enemy. There's something very old-fashioned about that."

In The Eagle, Bell plays the familiar role of an orphan. "My characters usually come from great hardship," he says. "Something bad has happened or there's been a recent death. I don't know why that is, expect maybe it's because I want something to play around with. I want something with a bit of depth. If I played happy people all the time, it would be boring."

In Jane Eyre, opening in March, Bell takes on the role of St. John Rivers, Jane's clergyman cousin. The Charlotte Bronte story has been filmed several dozen times, but Bell says, "Ours is a much darker take on the story. One of the producers told me, 'I've never seen St. John as Robert Mitchum before.' "

In the upcoming psychological thriller Retreat, he plays a soldier with a big secret. Also upcoming is Man on a Ledge, which Bell describes as "high-stakes suspense. It's a well-crafted story about this guy (Sam Worthington) who appears to be about to commit suicide. I play his brother."

In what is perhaps Bell's biggest role, he is the title character in Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn, due in December. Tintin is a comic strip character created by Belgian artist Georges Rémi in 1929 and is very popular in Europe.

"The character is somewhat computer-generated," Bell says, "but if you know me well, you'll see certain articulations of my face. We're trying to keep Tintin (looking as he does in the comic). I don't want him to look like Jamie Bell."

As a boy, Bell watched Tintin on TV. "It always felt different from the other cartoons because Tintin was dealing with something that was real," Bell says. "He was solving injustices and weeding out political corruption. He was really into technology. He was around well before Superman. He landed on the moon 16 years before Neil Armstrong."

Bell has worked hard to get out from under Billy Elliott's shadow, but he admits, "Without Billy Elliot, there would be no Jamie Bell. It's wrong to disregard it. It's also taken on its own life (on stage). It's given the opportunity to so many young people to play this great role and have their moment of real self expression.

"The film was kind of political about the time, but the story of the kid transcends all that and it becomes about the world is against this kid. He has this dream that's forbidden. Will he succeed?"

And what about the actor, who played Billy? Will he succeed?

"I'm ambitious, for sure," Bell says. "I have to do things a certain way and try to go above and beyond to make it work. Dancing is competitive. I was dancing for medals in front of judges and an audience when I was six years old. There is a value to winning and losing. It keeps you going."
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:33 am

http://www.sheknows.com/entertainment/articles/824265/channing-tatum-and-jamie-bell-dish-the-eagle

Jamie Bell burst onto the scene in Billy Elliot and has been working non-stop since, appearing in King Kong, Flags of Our Fathers and Defiance. Bell plays Esca, the British slave who has the power of life and death over his master. Bell had to learn to speak Gaelic for the role and brave some pretty harsh shooting conditions. He also had to eat a silicone rat, which he tells us was pretty disgusting. Also, look for Bell in the upcoming Jane Eyre.
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Sun Feb 13, 2011 7:05 pm

http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/culture/film_and_tv/film/article539540.ece

Poots is also required to sing (of rosebuds rather than fleshpots) in her role as Blanche Ingram in the forthcoming film version of Jane Eyre, where she and Michael Fassbender's Mr Rochester perform operetta duets, and again struggled, at times, to keep a straight face. “At least Michael and I will always have a duet up our sleeves if we need if we need it,” she laughs. “And you never know, And She Never Told Her Love could become a classic.” (...)

[N]ot to mention her charming tendency to blush like a peony at any opportunity. The more the director of Jane Eyre, Cary Fukunaga, asked her about her pink face on their first meeting (she had been filming Bouquet of Barbed Wire outdoors), the redder she went with self-consciousness. “I’m sure he wasn’t thinking it was charming. He was probably thinking, ‘Bloody hell, what’s wrong with this girl’s face?’”

(...) You can’t help thinking that playing Blanche Ingram was a blissful escape from what directors too often from what directors too often demand of their peachy-skinned, ambitious young actresses. (Lesley White)
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Mon Feb 14, 2011 12:03 pm

http://collider.com/jamie-bell-interview-the-eagle-tintin/75111/

Jamie Bell Exclusive Video Interview THE EAGLE; Plus Updates on TINTIN, JANE EYRE and MAN ON A LEDGE
by Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub Posted:February 13th, 2011 at 3:51 pm

About a week ago I sat down with Jamie Bell for an extended video interview as he was in Los Angeles promoting director Kevin Macdonald’s The Eagle (synopsis and clips here). During our fifteen minute conversation, he discussed how he got involved in the project, what kind of research he did and does research really matter, filming on location, and training for the role. In addition, Bell also gave me updates on what it was like to make The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn for Peter Jackson and Steve Spielberg, the challenges of motion capture, what it was like to work with Andy Serkis (he says Serkis “is the Gandalf of motion capture.”), when does he think they might film Tintin 2, and he also discusses his work in Jane Eyre, Man on a Ledge. Hit the jump to watch what he said:

the_eagle_movie_poster_01Finally, I want to give props to Jamie Bell for talking about his new glasses at the beginning of the interview. Sometimes when I throw out a weird first question it throws people off. Bell was cool about it.

Jamie Bell

* Talks about picking out his stylish glasses, which enhance his resemblance of a young Woody Allen
* 1:10 – His scheduled has been busy over the past year, from period pieces to motion capture
* 2:00 – Jeremy Brock’s script for The Eagle reminded Bell of The Defiant Ones, which led him to a meeting with director Kevin Macdonald
* 2:50 – To prepare for the film, he had to learn how to ride a horse, the Gallic language, and swordfighting, and the historical background
* 4:30 – The research was useful in creating a backstory and grounding the character
* 6:10 – Talks about filming The Eagle on location; contrasts with the controlled environment of the motion capture filming of Tintin
* 7:35 – Praises the cinematography of Anthony Dod Mantle
* What Spielberg and Jackson bring to the adaptation of such a major worldwide property; Bell got involved with the project through his connection with Jackson after filming King Kong
* Talks about working with motion capture master Andy Serkis: “He is the Gandalf of motion capture.”
* Discusses the flexibility of the motion capture process and the long post-production period
* The scenes were filmed with all the actors together on the set
* The tentative plan is for Peter Jackson start work on Tintin 2 after The Hobbit
* Talks Jane Eyre with Mia Wasikowska and Man on a Ledge with Sam Worthington and Ed Harris
* Bell has a lot of films to promote this year, which may mean a short break before his next time in front of cameras
* Talks about what he expects from the daunting worldwide promotional tour that awaits Tintin
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Wed Feb 23, 2011 1:23 am

http://www.newsok.com/jamie-bell-hates-period-dramas-but-not-enough-to-avoid-two/article/3542976?custom_click=lead_story_title

Jamie Bell hates period dramas, but not enough to avoid two
Get Jamie Bell talking about period dramas and his head might explode. Or at least he might pretend that it has, complete with dramatic sound effects.

BY BRANDY McDONNELL bmcdonnell@opubco.com
Published: February 23, 2011

Mia Wasikowska, left, and Jamie Bell star in "Jane Eyre." Focus

“Like seriously, I am so not into period dramas. I think being English, I am like overloaded with period dramas. You can't escape them. They're on TV all the time. It's like thrust upon you in school. Like you just cannot get away from this idea. I understand that for people who aren't kind (used) to having it shoved down their throats all the time, it's kind of interesting, kind of exciting to see. ‘Oh, like that's pretty, it looks nice, they kind of talk funny, it's kind of good.' But to me, it's so hackneyed. It's a hackneyed thing. It's boring,” he said in a recent interview in a meeting room at the posh Four Seasons Hotel.

“So why am I doing a period drama,” he said, with a long, thoughtful pause. “That's a good question.”

Actually, the English actor, 24, is involved with two period dramas: In the Roman saga “The Eagle,” currently nearing the end of its theatrical run, he plays a British slave named Esca who accompanies the Roman centurion (Channing Tatum) who owns him into northern Caledonia (present-day Scotland) on a quest to find a priceless golden eagle. On March 11, he can be seen onscreen in the new film version of Charlotte Bronte's often-adapted 1847 gothic novel “Jane Eyre.”

It seems that Bell, who broke out as a teen in the acclaimed 2000 dance film “Billy Elliott” and will play the title role in the Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson upcoming adaptation of “The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn,” actually is drawn to fascinating stories and talented directors.

With “Jane Eyre,” he took on the role of St. John Rivers, a missionary who takes in Jane (Mia Wasikowska) when she flees a haunting experience in the home of her employer, Mr. Rochester (Michael Fassbender) after his manager encouraged him to watch the first film from director Cary Fukunaga, the celebrated 2009 immigration tale “Sin Nombre.”

“That energy coming into something like that makes it fresh. And I think a gothic ‘Jane Eyre' is much more interesting,” he said. “We kind of understand this time period in a very aesthetic value. But we don't know what it feels like really, to really be there, to be an uneducated woman, who's kind of self-educated, doesn't come from any money in a time when all that matters — where you were educated and how much money you have. So what's it like to walk into these rooms and be with these people. So it's very much ‘Jane Eyre' from Jane Eyre's perspective,” he said.

For “The Eagle,” he had never read the source material, Rosemary Sutcliff's 1954 teen novel “The Eagle of the Ninth.” But he loved the script, the opportunity to work with “Last King of Scotland” director Kevin Macdonald and act opposite “the nicest guy in the world” and fellow dancer Tatum.

“I just really loved the story. I'd never heard of the novel, I'd never read the novel, but I just really liked the journey and the world it was set in. I thought I hadn't really seen this specific time period in a long time kind of done well. And I really loved the character of Esca a lot,” he said.

To make “The Eagle,” Bell had to learn to ride horse, memorize lines in the “predominantly dead language” of Scots Gaelic and undergo intensive fight training. And he had to cope with the frigid wet of a Scottish winter.

Location filming in Scotland for “The Eagle” was particularly a shock to the system after playing the adventurer Tintin in Spielberg's first motion-capture animated movie, Belgian artist Georges “Herge” Remi's classic comic series that dates back to 1929. Jackson, who directed Bell in 2005's “King Kong,” is producing the long-awaited film, set for Dec. 23 release.

“Listen, it was crazy because I actually finished off ‘Tintin' and then the next summer went straight into this,” Bell said. “We could shoot ‘Tintin' in here. You know, you just attach like a few, couple hundred cameras in the ceiling and a few people who kind of look like they work at NASA like over there on their computers and stuff and we could do it.

“And then you go to Scotland and you're freezing cold and there's actually real wind and real rain and it actually really hurts when you fall down and there's a real, live animal underneath you and stuff. So it's the complete antithesis of two different forms of filmmaking.

“Both are great. ... It was kind of a bit of a shock, though, to go from one to the next. It was a very strange experience.”
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Re: Jane Eyre actors

Post by Admin on Mon Sep 12, 2011 2:15 am

http://truthdive.com/2011/09/10/Judi-Dench-was-coaxed-by-sexiest-woman-on-set-promise-to-sign-Jane-Eyre.html

Saturday
Entertainment, News
Judi Dench was coaxed by ” sexiest woman on set” promise to sign Jane Eyre
September 10, 2011 – 4:54 pm

Washington, Sept 10 (ANI): In an effort to convince Dame Judi Dench, to sign up for his new project ‘Jane Eyre’, director Cary Fukunaga, had promised her that she would be “the sexiest woman on set” if she became a part of it.

The director revealed that he only got her to sign up the film after flattering her in a personal note he sent.he actress plays Mrs. Fairfax in the new adaptation of the classic Charlotte Bronte novel that also includesMia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender.

“I knew Judy’s agent from a trip that I had done to Sarajevo and she told me that Joe Wright had convinced her to be in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by sending her a personal note and that she appreciates humour.o I sent her a little note and I promised her that she’d be the sexiest woman on set if she did the film. It was done in a funny way and wasn’t cheesy at all,” Contactmusic quoted him as saying. (ANI)
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